July 2004 Archives

31 July 2004: NASA Photos Unearthed: George H.W. Bush Wore a Bunny Suit Too, SpaceRef

In 1981 Vice President George H.W. Bush visited Kennedy Space Center and toured Space Shuttle Columbia with the two astronauts who flew it on its first mission - John Young and Bob Crippen. Bush also wore a bunny suit.


30 July 2004: An Unsuitable Costume for the Manly Candidate, Washington Post

"Being generous, one might argue that Kerry's intellectual curiosity caused him to ignore how ridiculous he would look in the clean gear. The chance to crawl around in a spaceship was too tempting. Most folks would find that hard to pass up. But he is not most people -- he wants to be president. As a general rule, anyone aspiring to be the commander in chief should always try to avoid looking like a Teletubby."

30 July 2004: NASA flip-flops on 'bunny' pics, Florida Today

"Just as a silly story like this begins to fade, some bureaucrat breathes new life into it," said Keith Cowing, editor of the space Web site nasawatch.com, which posted all of the pictures Thursday before NASA deleted them. Cowing said the episode illustrates how confusion inside the Kerry campaign turned a tour "dripping with opportunity" -- one that included a space shuttle and a national hero, Mercury 7 astronaut and former senator Glenn -- into a "self-inflicted" political mishap."

A Peek Inside OExS

30 July 2004: Exclusive: NASA's new space 'hot rod', UPI

29 July 2004: Exclusive: NASA begins moon return effort, UPI

"Planners in NASA's Exploration Directorate recently gave United Press International an exclusive briefing on the steps they envision to fulfill President Bush's new vision for space exploration. These steps include designing the vehicle to fly back to the moon as well as the new fleet of atomic-powered spacecraft that may open up astronaut visits to deeper in space."

Editor's note: This was posted on the Yahoo group kerryspace. Lori Garver (Yahoo ID astromom2004) told people at a reception the other night that she is working on space policy issues for John Kerry. These comments were posted to a newsgroup with over a 160 members (a hundred of whom joined in the 24 hours since this was first posted on NASA Watch and SpaceRef - and linked to by the Drudge Report), several of whom are prominent space and science journalists. Moreover, these comments were already making the rounds within NASA.

From: "Lori Garver" < lgarver@d... >
Date: Sun Jul 18, 2004 10:17 am
Subject: RE: [kerryspace] Come Celebrate Kerry's Great VP Choice, Edwards!

Please don't write-off the Kerry-Edwards camp on space. The Bush initiative is simply hot-air and has made it impossible in an election year for Kerry to say much on space. What he has said -- will support increased funding for NASA R&D, will support Prizes, a more genuinely international effort, etc... is already more than most Presidential Candidates. It took Bush 3.5 years and a tragic Shuttle accident to come up with a policy. Democrats will be able to pull-off a better record -- if not rhetoric! Totally agree on futility of ISS as pharmacy source and need to retire Shuttle -- Kerry can be convinced of this, but perhaps not in the campaign. The Moon-Mars Blitz was a good way for Congress to see citizens supporting space -- always a good thing.

29 July 2004: Excerpt from John Kerry's acceptance speech

"Two young bicycle mechanics from Dayton asked what if this airplane could take off at Kitty Hawk? It did that and changed the world forever. A young president asked what if we could go to the moon in ten years? And now we're exploring the solar system and the stars themselves."

26 July 2004: John Kerry Visits NASA Kennedy Space Center - Photos

Update: The U.S. Office of Special Counsel has told NASA to remove all images of Kerry's visit to KSC from all NASA web sites - immediately - due to Hatch Act concerns. These images have now been removed.

Luckily, you can download the original pictures here: 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|

Just as you think this silly story is going away some bureaucrat finds a way to breathe new life back into it.

CLARIFICATION 1:00 PM EDT: NASA sources are now saying that NASA's General Counsel ordered the images removed - not the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.

YET ANOTHER CLARIFICATION 4:00 PM EDT: After reviewing all of the Kerry photos to ensure NASA's apolitical position, NASA has decided to put the photos of John Kerry in the OPF back online. The photos of the political rally at the visitors center will remain offline.

28 July 2004: Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by John Glenn, Democratic National Convention


"Good afternoon. More than 40 years ago, in a time of Cold War challenges -- but also a time of hope, possibility and new frontiers -- America sent me on a journey into space that not only changed my life, but changed our nation's view of earth itself.

A few years ago, I was privileged to make another journey into space, aboard the space shuttle Discovery, this time with 83 scientific research projects on board -- projects to benefit you and your children right here on earth. The world I saw from the heavens was no less spectacular the second time around. And while I am exceptionally proud to have represented America on these journeys of discovery, I am concerned.

It was education and research that fueled our post-war economic boom; with so many veterans studying under the G.I. Bill, it generated a whole new base for new technology, new types of business and good, middle-class jobs. It was education and research that gave us new opportunities to study in this new and unique laboratory of space, and that helped America put my friend Neil Armstrong on the moon, and win the Cold War.

In short, a commitment to leadership in education and research underpinned America's rise to greatness over the past 100 years. Our strength was built on sound public schools in every community, strong universities with the best labs, and a commitment to the ever-curious, questing spirit of America that is still unlocking the secrets of the universe through top-flight science. And it will be future education and research -- from earth and from space that will create the new industries and new jobs that increase our standard of living and will determine our leadership position in the world."

28 July 2004: Right Stuff, Wrong Staff: John Kerry Visits NASA and Blows a Photo Op, SpaceRef

"On Monday Democratic Presidential Candidate John Kerry made a campaign stop at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Monday. Kerry was accompanied by former Ohio Senator John Glenn and Florida Senators Bill Nelson and Bob Graham. Photos taken of this visit depict Kerry and others wearing so called "bunny suits" which are required of all visitors entering a space shuttle orbiter in the Shuttle Processing Facility. Bumbling by Kerry's staff, and a press corps itching for something to make fun of, and a perfect photo opportunity turns into a media nightmare. The net loser? NASA."

26 July 2004: John Kerry Visits NASA Kennedy Space Center - Photos

28 July 2004: Craig Kilborn re-enacts Kerry Photo-op on CBS (image)

28 July 2004: NASA defends photos of Kerry during his tour of space center, Florida Today

"Furthermore, NASA spokesman Bill Johnson said the Kerry campaign asked that the pictures be taken of the senator's unusually up-close tour of the Discovery and that processing be expedited so reporters could have them."

28 July 2004: Not Quite Ready for His Close-Up, NY Times

"Mr. Kerry's aides say privately that they had no idea anyone would be photographing him when he visited NASA in Florida on Monday and donned a special suit to tour the space shuttle Discovery."

28 July 2004: Kerry 'bunny suit' pics bring laughs from GOP, Newsday

"Kerry's campaign professed to be unconcerned about the pictures, with one Kerry official saying his worries were "zero. Absolutely zero." Republicans have had far less success painting Kerry as out of step, with Kerry running even with Bush in the polls. But this campaign official also said the campaign didn't expect the pictures of Kerry's tour with two other senators to be made public. "We were told that this was a private tour, and images of them wouldn't be released," said one Kerry official."

NASA ISS Flight Program Physical Sciences Research (PSR) 21 Jul 2004 (under review) is available.

John Kerry
"Asked by FOX News' Brit Hume if a dirty trick was being played, [Mary Beth Cahill, campaign manager for John Kerry] didn't answer the question directly but said: "What do you think?" "This was a legitimate tour of a NASA facility and this photograph came out of absolutely nowhere. We were surprised then. We aren't surprised now."

Editor's note: This is just silly. Kerry's handlers goofed - not NASA. According to NASA sources Sen. Bill Nelson suggested on the spur of the moment that Kerry and his entourage ought go and look at the inside of space shuttle orbiter. NASA tends to take a Senator's requests seriously and did their best to oblige. Originally Kerry's visit was to be confined to the KSC visitor's center. This new request was not part of the original planned visit. In order to visit the inside of a shuttle orbiter in the Orbiter Processing Facility, you need to wear a bunny suit. Everyone does. Kerry's staff asked NASA for photos - and NASA provided them. Since the photos were made with government resources, they were posted on the KSC website. Also, given that they were produced by the government they can be obtained via FOIA request.

Former NASA PAO chief Peggy Wilhide (Al Gore's former press secretary) is currently the spokesperson for the Democratic National Convention in Boston. Kerry's campaign manager Mary Beth Cahill (who is accusing NASA of 'leaking' these photos) would do well to have Peggy explain how these things work - and stop making these goofy charges against NASA. Oh yes, NASA's current PAO Chief, Glen Mahone, went to high school with Bill Clinton and was appointed to his current job while Clinton was still president. Anyone looking for political anti-Kerry bias in releasing these photos is wasting their time.

This really is silly. I cannot fathom why the Kerry folks think this is a bad image. John Kerry climbs inside the same space shuttle that carried John Glenn back into space - with Glenn at his side. Although Kerry's record on space is mediocre at best, such a photo op with an American icon inside an icon of America's space prowess ought to be something that the Kerry campaign proudly promotes. Or does the Kerry campaign have a problem with images of John Kerry inside a space shuttle being circulated i.e. are they afraid that he will be forced to take a stronger position on space than they would like him to adopt?

Update: NASA sources inform me that NASA KSC gave the Kerry campaign people about 30 CDs, which were to be distributed to local media by the Kerry people. The photos in question were on these CDs. Local reporters were seen with with these CDs later in the afternoon. As such, assuming that the reporters got the CDs from the Kerry campaign, the Kerry people distributed the photographs themselves! There was no "leak". Read the story: Kerry Camp Peeved at 'Leaked Photo', Fox News

27 July 2004: Republicans Try to Ridicule Kerry with NASA Photo, Reuters

"My hunch is that the brilliant Republicans who put George Bush in a flight suit to strut around an aircraft carrier won't get very far giving advice to NASA and John Glenn about the kinds of coveralls to wear on the Discovery," Kerry spokesman David Wade said of the first American to orbit earth."

"We sent men to the moon, and when that was not far enough, we sent Galileo to Jupiter, we sent Cassini to Saturn, and Hubble to touch the very edges of the universe at the very dawn of time. Americans showed the world what can happen when people believe in amazing possibilities. And, that, for me, is the spirit of America - the America you and I are working for in this election. It is the America that people all across this nation want to restore..."

John Kerry does KSC

26 July 2004: Kerry hunts for votes in Florida, Houston Chronicle

"About 250 people crammed a conference center at Kennedy Space Center for a Kerry forum billed as a discussion of science and the future. But the senator, sleep deprived by a hectic schedule , delivered a far-ranging but sometimes listless riff on the keywords of his campaign: strength, respect abroad, health care and jobs."

26 July 2004: John Kerry on Space 2004, SpaceRef

"Given this rather blunt rejection of human space flight and a permanent human presence in space, one has to wonder: if Kerry is this strongly against the International Space Station, a multi-year, multi-billion dollar international program several hundred miles overhead, whether he'd be any more interested in a similarly large, long-term project that sent humans to the Moon or Mars."

Editor's note: Excerpt from "New Moon Rising - The Making of America's New Space Vision and the Remaking of NASA" by Frank Sietzen Jr. and Keith L. Cowing which will be in bookstores in early August 2004.


26 July 2004: Kerry stumps at space center, Orlando Sentinel

"Speaking before an invited audience, Kerry said that the nation needs to continue exploring space -- but that it also has to apply the same vigor to problems on Earth. Kerry said it made perfect sense to be at KSC on the day the Democratic National Convention began in Boston."

26 July 2004: Kerry and Edwards Highlight Health Care Plan on Journey to Boston

"Americans have always come together to reach for distant horizons," Kerry said during his visit to the space center. "Our spirit of discovery has always united us - from Lewis and Clark's expedition to landing on the moon. That same spirit is what makes America strong. And it's what has always made America a leader in the world. We need to harness that spirit of discovery and innovation to build a stronger America."

From launching people into space to discovering new cures for the deadliest diseases, America has always pushed the boundaries of science to use America's can-do spirit to make us stronger at home. While the Bush administration has threatened our leadership in innovation and put ideology ahead of sound science, Kerry and Edwards' plan for America's future will once again ignite our country's sense of discovery and innovation to ensure high-quality health care for all Americans."

"As we celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, we always remember that it was Neil Armstrong who walked on the moon," Kerry said. "But we must never forget the American spirit of discovery and innovation that led us there."

26 July 2004: Deputy with Kerry injured in motorcade, ABC7News.com

"The campaign says the presidential candidate's car turned around and Kerry came back to check on the deputy. Fire and rescue crews arrived and, after about a five-minute stop, the motorcade continued to the Kennedy Space Center."

26 July 2004: Kerry is mum on moon and Mars, Florida Today

"The other astronaut-senator in attendance, Sen. Bill Nelson, said he has spoken at length with Kerry and is convinced the space program will not wilt under his leadership. Nelson said Kerry wants to continue exploring space with people and humans. He said Bush, despite announcing a new vision, has done little to fight for the funding NASA needs to do it."

Editor's note: Sen. Nelson is either unaware of the fact that the President has threatened to veto appropriations legislation that would cut implementation of his new space policy - or he is distorting events for partisan purposes.

Also - the phrase "continue exploring space with people and humans" has me a little confused. Is this a direct quote of something Nelson said? I always thought "people" = "humans".

Update: The article has been changed to read "people and robotic spacecraft."

NASA gets some Clarity

26 July 2004: Report of the Roles, Responsibilities And Structures ("Clarity") Team

"On January 14, 2004, President Bush announced that the United States would pursue a new Vision for Space Exploration. NASA Immediately recognized that changes would need to be made in order to effectively and efficiently pursue that vision. Shortly after the President's announcement, the Deputy Administrator formed the Roles, Responsibilities and Structure Team (also known as the "Clarity Team") charged to assess roles and responsibilities of the top-level agency management positions, as well as the strutural 2relationships between and among them."

25 July 2004: Deep Cuts Loom for NASA's Fiscal 2005 Spending Plan, Aviation Now

"A Senate Commerce Committee session to finish drafting the NASA authorization bill, which at least in theory mirrors the appropriations legislation, was postponed at the last minute July 22 for lack of time for the "very contentious" debate that committee chairman Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said he expected. The NASA markup will be rescheduled in September, he said."

23 July 2004: Bush threatens veto over NASA money, UPI

"This is the first time any U.S. president has threatened to veto a spending bill because it contained too little space money. The threat suggests the administration is committed to its space proposal and may risk an election-year fight -- even with Republican leaders -- to save Bush's space program."

22 July 2004: Analysis: Bush stands by his space plan, UPI

"For a sitting President in an election year to threaten to veto a bill containing appropriations for veterans and housing because of its space spending provisions is a clear signal Bush has not backed away from his space plan. It also is another sign NASA administrator Sean O'Keefe's legislative strategy -- what some have called a game of political "chicken" -- has several layers in place before supporter's options are exhausted."

22 July 2004: Letter from OMB Director Bolten to Rep. Bill Young Concerning the FY 2005 VA/HUD Appropriations bill

"If the final version of this bill that is presented to the President does not include adequate funding levels for Presidential initiatives, his Senior Advisors would recommend that he veto the bill."

22 July 2004: Full Committee Reports FY05 VA-HUD Appropriations Bill, U.S. House Committee on Appropriations


"NASA is funded at $15.1 billion, $229 million below last year and $1.1 billion below the request. The bulk of these savings come from the elimination of funding for new initiatives."

22 July 2004: Administrator Urges Full Funding of Vision for Space Exploration, NASA HQ

" Administrator Sean O'Keefe today acknowledged the tough financial decisions that have to be made by Congress in passing the fiscal year 2005 budget, but asked the chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations to restore more than $1 billion of recommended cuts made Tuesday by the appropriations subcommittee."

21 July 2004: Bush's NASA Plan Hits Speed Bump, Wired

"Despite these concessions, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) called the cuts "unacceptable" and suggested that he would stop the bill from being passed if it remains in its current state. "Yes, we are at war, just as we were when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. And yes, the budget is constricted," said DeLay in a statement. "But for four decades, America's mission in space has been one of the surest economic investments the federal government has made."

21 July 2004: Congress cuts funds to Bush's space plan, Houston Chronicle

"However, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, the Sugar Land Republican whose district includes NASA's Johnson Space Center, called the cuts "unacceptable," then warned: "It would be very hard to get this bill to the floor if it's unacceptable to me."

21 July 2004: Panel Cuts Bush's Budget Request for NASA, Washington Post

"The committee made it clear in its as-yet-unpublished report on the proposed legislation that it did not fully agree with the president's priorities: "While the committee is supportive of the exploration aspect of NASA's vision, the committee does not believe it warrants top billing over science and aeronautics," said the report, a copy of which was obtained by The Washington Post."

20 July 2004: Highlights of the FY05 VA-HUD Appropriations Bill, House Appropriations Committee

"NASA is funded at $15.1 billion, $229 million below last year and $1.1 billion below the request. The bulk of these savings come from the elimination of funding for new initiatives. The reductions include $30 million for technology maturation efforts; $230 million from Project Prometheus related to Jupiter Icy Moon Orbital; $438 million resulting from delaying the Crew Exploration Vehicle; and $100 million from Space Launch Initiatives by accelerating the termination of activities. The bill fully funds shuttle operations at the requested level of $4.3 billion. The committee fully funds Mars programs at the requested level of $691 million."

20 July 2004: Big Cuts to NASA's Budget Ahead?

Editor's note: According to CongressDaily AM "The House Appropriations Committee is planning to cut as much as $1 billion from President Bush's budget request for NASA, as part of a $92.9 billion FY05 VA-HUD appropriations bill to be marked up today .... That total is $2.1 billion over last year's enacted levels for the dozens of programs and agencies under the measure's jurisdiction, and a $2.5 billion increase is pledged to veterans' healthcare programs alone."

"The committee made it clear in its as-yet-unpublished report on the proposed legislation that it did not fully agree with the president's priorities: "While the committee is supportive of the exploration aspect of NASA's vision, the committee does not believe it warrants top billing over science and aeronautics," said the report, a copy of which was obtained by The Washington Post."

Link: Full Story

"However, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, the Sugar Land Republican whose district includes NASA's Johnson Space Center, called the cuts "unacceptable," then warned: "It would be very hard to get this bill to the floor if it's unacceptable to me."

Link: Full story

"Despite these concessions, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) called the cuts "unacceptable" and suggested that he would stop the bill from being passed if it remains in its current state. "Yes, we are at war, just as we were when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. And yes, the budget is constricted," said DeLay in a statement. "But for four decades, America's mission in space has been one of the surest economic investments the federal government has made."

Link: Full Story

Throwing away resources

20 July 2004: Having Too Much and Too Little Oxygen on the Space Station, SpaceRef

"Several Russian Progress spacecraft were allowed to reenter Earth's atmosphere in 2003 carrying unused oxygen supplies. In one case, half of the oxygen being delivered to the ISS was dumped into the Pacific Ocean when these Progress spacecraft later reentered the Earth's atmosphere. Within months the ISS would face the prospect of a shortfall in oxygen supplies - and contingency scenarios, which included leaving the ISS, unmanned as an option."

"NASA is funded at $15.1 billion, $229 million below last year and $1.1 billion below the request. The bulk of these savings come from the elimination of funding for new initiatives. The reductions include $30 million for technology maturation efforts; $230 million from Project Prometheus related to Jupiter Icy Moon Orbital; $438 million resulting from delaying the Crew Exploration Vehicle; and $100 million from Space Launch Initiatives by accelerating the termination of activities. The bill fully funds shuttle operations at the requested level of $4.3 billion. The committee fully funds Mars programs at the requested level of $691 million."

Link: Press Release

20 July 2004: Big Cuts to NASA's Budget Ahead?

Editor's note: According to CongressDaily AM "The House Appropriations Committee is planning to cut as much as $1 billion from President Bush's budget request for NASA, as part of a $92.9 billion FY05 VA-HUD appropriations bill to be marked up today .... That total is $2.1 billion over last year's enacted levels for the dozens of programs and agencies under the measure's jurisdiction, and a $2.5 billion increase is pledged to veterans' healthcare programs alone."

"Several Russian Progress spacecraft were allowed to reenter Earth's atmosphere in 2003 carrying unused oxygen supplies. In one case, half of the oxygen being delivered to the ISS was dumped into the Pacific Ocean when these Progress spacecraft later reentered the Earth's atmosphere. Within months the ISS would face the prospect of a shortfall in oxygen supplies - and contingency scenarios, which included leaving the ISS, unmanned as an option."

Link: Full Story

Shuttle RTF costs mount

16 July 2004: Return-to-flight costs soar, Houston Chronicle

"The cost of returning NASA's three space shuttles to flight could reach $1.2 billion, more than double the January estimate, space agency officials said Friday."

16 July 2004: Shuttles' upgrade bill leaps by 50%, Orlando Sentinel

"Lawmakers praised NASA for coming forward to disclose the higher costs, and vowed to make sure the agency has enough money to fly safely. But NASA's history of red ink also means Congress will carefully scrutinize the numbers."

B>16 July 2004: NASA Office of Space Exploration 2004 Centennial Challenges Workshop Report

"The 2004 Centennial Challenges workshop was held on Tuesday and Wednesday, 15 and 16 June 2004 at the Hilton Washington hotel. In attendance were representatives from big and small industry, aerospace and non-aerospace, universities, government, and interested individuals."

15 July 2004: Witnesses at House Science Committee Hearing Express Strong Support for Aerospace Prizes, House Science Committee

"While establishment of a NASA prize program is certainly worth considering, we should not be lulled into thinking that it is any substitute for providing adequate funding for NASA's R&D programs," cautioned Subcommittee Ranking Minority Member Nick Lampson (D-TX).

15 July 2004: Statement of Craig E. Steidle at House Science Committee Hearing on NASA Aerospace Prizes

"Congress is important to the success of Centennial Challenges. NASA has requested specific authority from Congress to conduct large prize competitions with purses up to $50 million in size and to retain funding for prize purses over multiple years. Both of these authorities are important to maximize the utility of Centennial Challenges."

15 July 2004: Hearing Charter: House Science Committee Hearing on NASA Aerospace Prizes

15 July 2004: Prepared Statement by Molly Macauley at a House Science Committee Hearing on NASA Aerospace Prizes

15 July 2004: Prepared Statement by Douglas Holtz-Eakin at a House Science Committee Hearing on NASA Aerospace Prizes

15 July 2004: Prepared Statement by Peter Diamandis at a House Science Committee Hearing on NASA Aerospace Prizes

14 July 2004: Book charts development of new space vision, Florida Today

"The fight ended with President Bush handing the agency a long-desired new
mission to dispatch humans to explore the solar system -- not stopping at
the moon, but venturing beyond.

However, that outcome was anything but certain during the highly secret,
months-long battle during which the White House, NASA, the Pentagon and
others in the federal government weighed in on where the U.S. should go in
space and how much money to devote to that.

That's the story laid out in a new book by two aerospace reporters who got a
rare behind-the-scenes look at how high-profile policy gets made in the
White House. The book is scheduled for release this week. "New Moon Rising" promises to take readers inside the halls of NASA headquarters, and to some degree the White House, to watch the vision being
formulated."

14 July 2004: Kerry's Inner Circle Expands, Washington Post

"And experts have been enlisted to draft policy memos on issues -- from the technical to the obscure -- that just may crop up between now and November. Advisers have crafted briefings on Microsoft billionaire Paul G. Allen's private spacecraft, African trade agreements, a manned mission to Mars and federal tax deductibility of state sales taxes."

NAS Reports on Hubble

14 July 2004: Hubble repair options 'open', Houston Chronicle

14 July 2004: Astronauts could save Hubble, says panel, New Scientist

14 July 2004: Keep Hubble Repair Options Open - Experts, Reuters

13 July 2004: Report to NASA by the NAS Committee on the Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope

Editor's rant: Editor's note: I have been ordered by a rather obnoxious press officer at the National Academy of Sciences to remove this document from our servers. They claim that they retain copyright to it - even though it is a deliverable to the United States Congress and to NASA - and an official, public letter sent to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Since they are asserting that they retain copyright to this document and I will remove it. However, the fact that all of their efforts - including this one - are paid for with tax dollars seems to be lost on them. NASA buys their services.

Moreover, and I have official NAS email to document this, I have, for years, been sent materials by NAS employees with the specific request that I post them so as to increase their distribution. Yesterday, I spoke with their press office and told them that I was going to post the report and they had no problem with that. Now, 24 hours later, they have suddenly changed their mind. The NAS needs to get their act together and send a memo out to their employees and establish a policy once and for all. In so doing they need to get off their throne and keep in mind who pays all of their bills - and who they work for.

"Based on its current assessment of the conclusions and recommendations contained in the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) report and the Stafford-Covey reports (latest dated May 19, 2004), the committee concludes that a shuttle flight to the HST is not precluded by or inconsistent with the recommendations from these two NASA advisory groups."

"RECOMMENDATION. The committee urges that NASA commit to a servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope that accomplishes the objectives of the originally planned SM-4 mission, including both the replacement of the present instruments with the two instruments already developed for flight-the Wide Field Camera-3 and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph- and the engineering objectives, such as gyroscope and battery replacements. Such a servicing mission would extend the life of this unique telescope and maximize its productivity."

"RECOMMENDATION. At the same time that NASA is vigorously pursuing development of robotic servicing capabilities, and until the agency has completed a more comprehensive examination of the engineering and technology issues, including risk assessments related to both robotic and human servicing options, NASA should take no actions that would preclude a space shuttle servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope."

Editor's note: The NAS did exactly what Hal Gehman did: they punted. No firm opinion 'yes' or 'no' with regard to a human or robotic mission to Hubble. AS such, the value of this report is dubious at best since it simply resets the entire discussion back to where it was when the report was first called for - and throws the issue back into NASA's lap.

Hal Gehman said "do the best you can". Now the NAS says "keep your options open".

13 July 2004: House Science Committee Democrats React to National Academies' Report on Hubble Space Telescope

13 July 2004: House Science Committee Boehlert Praises Academy Report

13 July 2004: NASA Administrator Supports Efforts of the National Academies on Behalf of Hubble Space Telescope

12 July 2004: NAS Hubble Servicing Report Release imminent

Editor's note: Word has it that the NAS will release its report on NASA's cancellation of the SM4 Hubble Servicing mission on Wednesday. Congress should have the report on Tuesday.

Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope, NAS SSB

12 July 2004: Not quite exactly deja vu all over again, Dwayne Day, Space Review

"O'Keefe was apparently involved in drafting the new Vision, although his objections and contributions to the plan remain unknown. O'Keefe appears to be an enthusiastic supporter of the new policy. Even if his enthusiasm is partially an act, it could hardly be worse than the Space Exploration Initiative experience, where then NASA Administrator Dick Truly was widely reported to be completely opposed to the new policy."

Editor's note: Instead of just guessing about O'Keefe's involvement, questioning his motives, and jumping to conclusions, why not ask him (and others) Dwayne?

9 July 2004: The ultimate public-private partnership - Bigelow, NASA now working together on space hotel, Las Vegas Mercury

"Few journalists have been allowed inside the secure confines of the 50-acre "space campus" Bigelow Aerospace has built in North Las Vegas, and with good reason. Bigelow has long shunned any kind of publicity for himself, and since he is investing up to $500 million of his personal fortune into the aerospace company, he's reluctant to give away too much information to potential competitors. It's the same reason his facility is surrounded by fences, gates, cameras and an imposing security force made up of ex-military types. "Now, though, it may be time to talk," Bigelow told the Mercury . "NASA thinks so too."

8 July 2004: SEA release: Space Exploration Alliance Grows as Moon-Mars Blitz Nears, NSS

Editor's note: According to an email sent out by the Mars Society about this event "some 70 space activists visiting approximately 200 congressmen, senators, and congressional and Senatorial aides to convey to them a message of strong support for the new American space policy that refocuses the human spaceflight program on the goal of sending humans to the Moon, Mars and beyond." These folks paid their own way to Washington, and took off time from work and their lives to push for something they truly believe in. However, these 70 people represent 0.007 percent of the "million Americans" the Space Exploration Alliance proclaimed to count among its numbers - and is a vastly smaller portion of America's current population of 294,000,000. In some ways this was a great turn out. Viewed from other perspectives it could be seen as indicative of just how unimportant space is in terms of being a mobilizing force among the American electorate. Indeed, often times here in Washington, turnouts in the tens of thousands for political efforts are often referred to as "disappointing". By that standard this event doesn't even register.

Layoffs at LARC?

8 July 2004: NASA Langley 'transforming', Daily Press

"NASA Langley Research Center will cut 20 percent of its supervisor positions, open competition to many senior posts and improve the bidding process for space exploration work, under a reorganization plan announced Wednesday. Neither layoffs nor pay cuts are part of the new plan, said Lesa Roe, Langley's recently named deputy director. But supervisors who don't win their jobs back in an agencywide hiring process might be reassigned to science and technology positions with equitable pay."

8 July 2004: Langley changes reflect ''one-NASA'' idea, PIlot Online

"Deputy Director Lesa B. Roe, said no jobs will be lost, but reducing the number of supervisory positions will save money in the long term. She said the center, which employs about 2,200 civil servants, may offer early retirement packages to those who cannot be reassigned. The structure will fully be in place by December, she said."

8 July 2004: Langley center cutting top supervisor jobs 20%, Times Dispatch

"Langley, which has about 2,400 civil-service employees and an annual budget of nearly $800 million, expects the loss of contracts for space programs that provide nearly a quarter of its current budget. Those programs were made obsolete by the new exploration goals."

Editor's note: You know, this doesn't quite add up. Not everyone is going to find a new job. Indeed, some people are going to be out of their jobs - and not have a place to go. LaRC management needs to be a bit more forthcoming in this regard. They may not want to use the word 'layoff' (or "RIF') but the consequences of this reorganization may eventually have the same end result. NASA's greatest asset is its people. They need to have the full story from management.

8 July 2004: Space station scenario an unlikely protection, sources say, NY Times via Houston Chronicle

"The employees who provided the documents said the agency was cutting corners on cost and demanding that its schedule of space station construction be followed, with safety an afterthought. "Despite all the hype about the so-called culture changing at NASA," said one employee, "recent events have given us little confidence that NASA management will do the right thing."

8 July 2004: AIA Asks Bush, Kerry To Back Increased NASA Funding, Aerospace Daily

"We just wanted to remind both candidates that this part of the aerospace industry is enormously important to us. It's enormously important to the American people and we need to make sure that NASA is adequately funded to meet this important need of the future," said AIA President and CEO John W. Douglass."

8 July 2004: New Book "New Moon Rising" Reveals How Secret Inner White House Circle Created the Bush Administration's New Space Vision for U.S., Space Frontier Foundation

"A soon to be released book, "New Moon Rising", being launched at the Return To The Moon Conference in Las Vegas (July 16th-18th) will reveal some of the most detailed inner workings of the White House ever revealed since this Administration came into office."

Earlier entries


7 July 2004: NASA Names Two Deputy Associate Administrators for New Science Mission Directorate

"Alphonso V. Diaz, who will assume leadership of NASA's new Science Mission Directorate as its Associate Administrator on Aug. 1, today named Orlando Figueroa Deputy Associate Administrator for Programs and Alison L. McNally Deputy Associate Administrator for Management in the directorate, effective Aug. 1."



7 July 2004: NASA's David Morrison wins 2004 Sagan Medal

"The Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) has awarded its 2004 Carl Sagan Medal to Dr. David Morrison of the NASA Ames Research Center. The Sagan Medal is awarded annually to an active researcher in the DPS for long-term excellence in the communication of planetary science to the public. The Sagan Medal will be presented to Morrison at DPS 2004, which will convene November 8-12 in Louisville, Kentucky."



1 July 2004: NASA Administrator Names Neal M. to be Special Assistant to the Administrator and acting Chief of Strategic Communications

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe today named Dr. Neal M. Burns to be Special Assistant to the Administrator and acting Chief of Strategic Communications, effective immediately. Burns is Director of the Center for Brand Research at the University of Texas at Austin."



25 June 2004: NASA General Counsel Paul G. Pastorek Returns to Private Law Practice

"Administrator Sean O'Keefe today announced that NASA General Counsel Paul G. Pastorek will to return to private law practice. He has been a key member of the NASA senior management team and a trusted advisor to Administrator O'Keefe for the past two-and-one-half years."


25 June 2004: Michael Wholley Selected as NASA General Counsel

"Administrator Sean O'Keefe today selected retired Marine Brigadier General Michael Wholley as the NASA General Counsel, effective immediately. Wholley succeeds Paul G. Pastorek and joins NASA after a distinguished career of public service in the Marine Corps."



15 June 2004: Chuck Kline has died.

Editor's note: Chuck Kline, Public Affairs Officer for the Associate Administrator for Space Transportation (AST) at the FAA has died after a brief illness. A memorial service will be held at 2pm on Saturday at the National Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Hwy. in Falls Church."




9 June 2004: NASA Names Lesa Roe to be Deputy Director of Langley Research Center

"Roy D. Bridges Jr., Director of NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC), Hampton, Va., today named Lesa Roe as Deputy Director. Roe will assist in the general management of the Center and act with the authority of the Director in his absence. She will help plan, organize and direct Center and inter-center activities to advance research significant to national aerospace programs and objectives."

Editor's note: Yes, in case you are wondering, Lesa Roe is the wife of NESC Director Ralph Roe.

10 June 2004: NASA promotes wife of key Columbia manager, Orlando Sentinel

"Lesa Roe will stand in for Bridges when he is away, but Langley spokeswoman Marny Skora said it has been mandated that Ralph Roe will deal only with Bridges, and not his wife, on administrative matters. The NESC is overseen by Bryan O'Connor, the top safety official at NASA headquarters in Washington."

Editor's note: It seems rather odd that you'd deliberately appoint someone to be the number two manager of a NASA field center (and in some instances the acting center director) and, at the same time, remove them from the possibility of any oversight of a very prominent activity located within that center. I have to think that there are many people who could do just as good a job without this conflict of interest - a conflict which serves as an impediment to their ability to fully manage all that their boss has to manage - should the need arise. As such, Lesa Roe's title should really be "Quasi-Deputy Center Director". Of course, if Roy Bridges has no interaction at all with the NESC then this is not an issue.



8 June 2004: Ex-NASA Chief Richard Truly Retiring, AP

"Richard Truly, a former astronaut and NASA administrator who has headed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory since 1997, said Tuesday he will retire in November."



4 June 2004: NASA Selectes Admiral Cantrell for Independent Technical Authority

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe today selected Rear Admiral (Ret.) Walter H. Cantrell to help establish and lead the agency's independent technical authority within its engineering, operations and safety organizations. Cantrell joins NASA as Deputy Chief Engineer for Independent Technical Authority (ITA), effective June 7. He has served on NASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) and as a member of the Stafford-Covey Task Group (SCTG) assessing the agency's return to flight implementation efforts."



28 May 2004: NASA Bigwig Visits Future Engineers, UCSB Daily Nexus

"UCSB engineering students may better understand the importance of concise technical communication after hearing a talk given by Charles Whetsel, chief engineer of the NASA Mars Exploration Program."



24 May 2004: New Assignment for NASA Chief's Assistant Stirs Accusations of Favoritism, Washington Post

"[Retha] Whewell's reassignment, however, has prompted criticism inside NASA by people who say she got special treatment from O'Keefe that he would not give other agency employees. The critics, who spoke on condition that they not be identified because of fear of retribution, said Whewell's new job was handled by the agency's top personnel officials rather than being submitted for normal processing."




6 May 2004: Special Communication from the NASA IFM Program Office: Death of Rita Mason and Peggy Williams, NASA HQ

"Our entire NASA family is mourning the tragic loss of Rita Mason and Peggy Williams, who lost their lives in a car accident this past weekend. Rita Mason and Peggy Williams were members of the IFMP Project team in Huntsville, Ala., and had been with us through the entire development cycle of our Integrated Asset Management (IAM) implementation procurement activity."





29 April 2004: NASA Names New Astronaut Class on Space Day

"The next generation of explorers is here. NASA will announce a new class of astronaut candidates, including three educator astronauts, May 6. The announcement is part of the Space Day celebration at the National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. The program begins at 9:30 a.m. EDT and will be broadcast live on NASA Television."




25 April 2004: NASA MOD Email regarding Henry Allen's Passing

"His contributions to the Operations team have been un-paralleled and he was always on the leading edge of new technologies. That kind of leadership and mentoring will continue to benefit us all far into the future. The threads he added to the fabric of our culture continue to bind us together and strengthen us."



20 April 2004: NASA selects Air Force pilot for astronaut training, Air Force News Service

"Maj. James P. Dutton of Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., is the only Airman among 11 military and civilians to be accepted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration this year."



17 April 2004: James L. Crawford Named NASA Kennedy Space Center Director of Safety and MIssion Assurance

"NASA Kennedy Space Center Director James W. Kennedy announced today that James. L. "Larry" Crawford was named as the Director of the newly created Safety and Mission Assurance organization at KSC. Crawford will be responsible for the nearly 250 professionals assigned to ensure KSC is a safe workplace and mission success is accomplished."

17 April 2004: Dennis A. Kross Named Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager at NASA Kennedy Space Center

"Kennedy Space Center Director James W. Kennedy recently announced that Dennis A. Kross was selected as Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kross will assume his new role April 19. In this capacity, he is responsible for all aspects of Space Shuttle preparation, launch, and return of the orbiter to KSC following flight."





8 April 2004: NASA Names Exploration Project Directors

"NASA selected Garry M. Lyles as Deputy Director of Project Constellation and Charles J. Precourt as Program Director of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)."



24 March 2004: NASA ARC Center-wide Memo: G. Allen Flynt to Leave Ames and Return to JSC

"In his new position at JSC, Flynt will be responsible for human space flight operations, including mission design and activity planning, flight crew and flight controller training, real-time mission management and flight execution and the operations facilities development and sustaining engineering including the mission control center for Shuttle and Station and the training facilities."




16 March 2004: NASA Remembers William H. Pickering, Former Director of JPL

"Dr. William H. Pickering, a central figure in the U.S. space program and former director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., passed away Monday of pneumonia at his home in La Canada Flintridge, Calif. He was 93."




10 March 2004: NASA Names Deputy Assistant Administrators for External Relations

"NASA Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory today announced the appointments of Albert "Al" Condes as Deputy Assistant Administrator, and Joseph R. "Joe" Wood as Deputy Assistant Administrator (Exploration), Office of External Relations."




27 February 2004: NASA Creates Office of Institutional and Corporate Management

"NASA's Deputy Administrator, Fred Gregory, named Jeffrey E. Sutton as the agency's Assistant Administrator, Office of Institutional and Corporate Management. The new office (Code O) will provide technical expertise, policy oversight and overall leadership for NASA's institutional, corporate, infrastructure and management systems activities. Code O will manage the NASA Directives Management System; internal management control and audit follow-up systems, including internal assessments and the ISO 9001-based management systems."




5 January 2004: NASA Names Assistant Administrator for Legislative Affairs

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe today named D. Lee Forsgren as the agency's new Assistant Administrator for Legislative Affairs, effective immediately. Forsgren succeeds Charles T. Horner III, who will continue to serve the agency as a special assistant to the Office of NASA Administrator."

Editor's note: Forsgren comes from the law firm of Adams & Reese - the same law firm NASA General Counsel Paul Pastorek once worked at.




25 November 2003: Horner to Leave NASA

Editor's note: Current Associate Administrator for Legislative Affairs Charles Horner will be leaving NASA soon. His last day at NASA will be 1 January 2004. Horner will be replaced by D. Lee Forsgren (bio) from the law firm of Adams & Reese - the same law firm NASA General Counsel Paul Pastorek once worked at.



17 November 2003: NASA Places Full Page Employment Ad in NY Times Magazine

Editor's note: This full page advertisement (image) appeared in the 16 November 2003 issue of the New York Times (Sunday) Magazine.



12 November 2003: New AA for Code R

Editor's note: Word has it that Gen. Lester Lyles will soon be named to be the Associate Administrator for Code R at NASA HQ. Lyles has been a consultant at Code R for some time.



13 November 2003: NASA Names Stennis Space Center Deputy Director

"NASA's Associate Administrator, Office of Space Flight, William Readdy, announced today David Throckmorton is Deputy Director, Stennis Space Center (SSC), Miss., effective December 1, 2003."



14 November 2003: Leaders Named for New NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC)

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced the team that will lead the new NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC)."

15 November 2003: Controversial appointment at NASA, Daily Press

"Members of the Senate Commerce Committee complained in September about NASA's selection of Roe as the man to help establish the center at NASA Langley. Roe said Friday that his mistakes, which were detailed in the Columbia Accident Investigation Board's report in August, would help him in his new role."




12 November 2003: NASA Names New Stennis Space Center Director

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced today the appointment of U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Thomas Q. Donaldson, V as the Director, John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), Miss., effective January 5, 2004."



12 November 2003: Michael Rudolphi Named NASA Space Shuttle Propulsion Manager

"NASA's Space Shuttle Program Manager, William Parsons announced today Michael Rudolphi has been named manager of the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office at NASA' s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., effective December 1, 2003."



23 October 2003: NASA Names New Deputy Director for Glenn Research Center

"NASA announced today Richard S. Christiansen is the new Deputy Director for the agency's Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, effective Nov. 16. Christiansen has been the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Associate Director for Planning since January 2001."




10 October 2003: NASA Names Dr. Steven J. Dick to be New Historian

"He is a well-known expert in the field of astrobiology and its cultural implications. He spent three years at the Naval Observatory's Southern Hemisphere station in New Zealand. Dick served as the first Historian of the Naval Observatory, and has most recently been the Acting Chief of its Nautical Almanac Office."

Editor's note: In the late 1990's participated in a long series of planning and organizing meetings for NASA's Astrobiology program with Steve (and many others). If ever NASA had a historian who could place where the agency has been and where it is going into a cosmic, yet readily accessible context, it is Steve. Excellent choice.



29 September 2003: House Science Committee Chief Counsel Barry Beringer Passes Away

"With great sadness, the House Committee on Science today announced the death of its longtime chief counsel, Barry C. Beringer. Barry had been suffering from pancreatic cancer, which was diagnosed early this year."



12 August 2003: The 'new' guy, editorial, Cleveland Plain Dealer

"More than ever, then, Earls deserves - and indeed must have - the support of Greater Cleveland's business, educational and political leaders. Even if this region had no aspirations toward a high-tech future, the NASA Glenn Research Center would be far too important an installation to allow to founder."

Editor's Note: And NASA Glenn Research Center needs to learn how to get off its collective butt and be relevant 365 days a year - not just during those brief annual episodes when their programs are threatend and they need people to go to bat for them. Moreover, GRC needs to make itself more relevant to the community within which it resides - and not just be that place with X number of jobs out near the airport.



11 August 2003: NASA Names Michael O'Brien as New Assistant Administrator for External Relations

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe today announced the appointment of Michael O'Brien as the Assistant Administrator for External Relations, effective immediately. O'Brien replaces John Schumacher who became the NASA Chief of Staff in July."



10 August 2003: New Day at NASA Langley: Bridges' move from Kennedy Space Center not without questions, Daily Press

"The test will be how long Bridges plans to stay at Langley", said NASA observer Keith Cowing, who runs the popular Nasawatch.com Internet site. At 60, Bridges already has several prestigious leadership roles at NASA and the Air Force under his belt. "If Bridges is there a year from now, then I would say this is a plus for Langley," he said. "But if Bridges is out of there in six months, then this is a chess move." Bridges, who is in the process of buying a house in the Williamsburg area, said he intends to stick around."

10 August 2003: NASA Glenn chief leaves; deputy gets job, Cleveland Plain Dealer

"Political and community leaders, who had been increasingly critical of Campbell's low-profile leadership style and the inability of NASA Glenn's $765 million annual budget to be more of an economic catalyst for Northeast Ohio, welcomed the announcement."



8 August 2003: NASA GRC Center Director Campbell Selected as NASA Deputy Administrator Special Assistant, NASA HQ

8 August 2003: Julian Earls Selected to Lead NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA HQ

"NASA Deputy Administrator Frederick D. Gregory today named Donald J. Campbell, Director for NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, to help develop high-power generation systems for propulsion and exploration. Effective Oct. 1, Campbell will become Special Assistant for Nuclear and Alternative Power Generation Systems. Dr. Julian M. Earls, GRC Deputy Director, will take over as Center Director, when Campbell assumes his new position."



30 July 2003: Costly astronauts wield too much clout, OpEd, Jim Oberg, USA Today

"The biggest problem this expensive workforce causes is the dominance in the agency of "astronaut think." Former astronauts make their way into high-level management positions throughout NASA. There they form what cynics call "the astronaut mafia," a buddy system that imposes the astronauts' will on managers."



30 July 2003: JoAnn Morgan to Retire After 45-year Career at NASA KSC, NASA KSC

"JoAnn Morgan, director of External Relations and Business Development at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), announced her retirement from NASA, effective Aug. 3, 2003. Morgan's career spans 45 years and includes a list of firsts at KSC, including her appointment as the first woman senior executive at the space center. She has been in leadership roles at KSC for the past 20 years."




16 July 2003: NASA Names Michael Wetmore Launch Integration Manager for Space Shuttle Program, NASA KSC

"National Aeronautics and Space Administration officials today named Michael E. Wetmore as the new Launch Integration Manager for the Space Shuttle program. He assumes the responsibilities of this role effective immediately."


14 July 2003: Rex Geveden Named NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Deputy Director

"William F. Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Flight at NASA Headquarters in Washington, today named Rex D. Geveden as the new Deputy Director of the agency's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala. Geveden will succeed David King, who became Center Director on June 15."

14 July 2003: Woodrow Whitlow Named NASA Kennedy Space Center Deputy Director

"William F. Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Flight at NASA Headquarters in Washington, today named Woodrow Whitlow, Jr., Ph.D., as the new Deputy Director of the agency's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Fla., effective August 31. Whitlow will succeed James W. Kennedy, who becomes Center Director on August 10."


10 July 2003: NASA OIG: Improving Management of the Astronaut Corps

"We found that overly optimistic predictions of future flight rates, minimal regulation of astronaut candidate selection, and the need to staff engineering positions at Johnson Space Center to be factors in the Agency's astronaut hiring process. As a result, costs for the astronaut program were higher than necessary and individuals trained to be astronauts were not all being used in a manner commensurate with their expensive training."



2 July 2003: Shuttle Program Manager Announces Personnel Changes, NASA JSC

"Space Shuttle Program Manager Bill Parsons today announced several key leadership changes within the office as it reorganizes and evolves following the Columbia accident."



26 June 2003: Lockheed Martin Elects E.C. 'Pete' Aldridge to Board of Directors

"E.C. "Pete" Aldridge, Jr. has been elected to the Lockheed Martin Board of Directors, effective June 26th. Mr. Aldridge, 64, retired from government service in May."



26 June 2003: James W. Kennedy named Director, NASA Kennedy Space Center

"William F. Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Flight at NASA Headquarters in Washington, today named James W. Kennedy as the new Director of the agency's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Kennedy has served as KSC's Deputy Director since November 2002. He will succeed General Roy Bridges, who was appointed to lead NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., June 13."




16 June 2003: MSFC's Stephenson proud of space, technology work, Huntsville Times

"The job at the National Space Science and Technology Center is clearly a holding pattern for Stephenson. He plans to retire from government service by January 2004, he said, and hopes to find work in Huntsville's private sector."




13 June 2003: Roy Bridges Leaving KSC to Head LaRC

Update: At a noon press conference, NASA Adminstrator O'Keefe will announce that KSC Center Director Roy Bridges will be moving from KSC to become the Center Director of Langley Research Center. Deputy Center Director James Kennedy will serve as acting Center Director while a permanent search for Bridges' replacement is found. This is a rather interesting move - taking a human spaceflight veteran and placing him at a center known in many people's minds primarily for aeronautics research. Then again, LaRC has a rich tradition of making significant contributions to spaceflight - one that goes back to NASA's very origins. Stay tuned - more to follow.

Roy Bridges biographical information, NASA JSC

13 June 2003: Gen. Roy. D. Bridges Named Langley Center Director, NASA HQ

"Gen. Roy D. Bridges, Center Director for NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Fla., has been named Center Director for the agency's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., Gen. Bridges, a retired U.S. Air Force Major General and former Space Shuttle pilot will assume his new duties Aug. 10."

13 June 2003: Kennedy Space Center to get new director, Orlando Sentinel

"After the press conference, O'Keefe acknowledged that he and Bridges didn't always agree, but maintained their differences were always part of a healthy debate. But their enmity spilled into the news last September, when NASA headquarters canceled an expensive and troubled computer upgrade. A NASA program manager gathered several hundred employees in a parking lot at KSC to tell them the Checkout and Launch Control System project has been scrapped, a move that O'Keefe blasted as displaying "an absolute insensitivity and failure to be leaders."




10 June 2003: Taft asks NASA chief to fix Glenn problems, Cleveland Plain Dealer

"Concerned about a recent evaluation of the NASA Glenn Research Center that detected leadership and performance problems, Gov. Bob Taft has written the head of NASA, Sean O'Keefe, urging reform."




10 June 2003: NASA Associate Administrator For Aerospace Technology Retiring, NASA HQ

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced today, Dr. Jeremiah F. Creedon, Associate Administrator for Aerospace Technology is retiring after 40 years with the agency to join the faculty at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Va., effective July 3."




< 30 May 2003: Allen Flynt Named NASA Ames Research Center Deputy Center Director

"G. Allen Flynt was today named deputy director at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., effective Aug. 3. Flynt comes to Ames from the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston where he served as manager of the Extra- Vehicular Activity (EVA) Project Office."

30 May 2003: Steve Doering Named EVA Project Office Acting Manager

"Steve Doering has been named acting manager of the Extravehicular Activities Project Office at the Johnson Space Center. Doering replaces Allen Flynt, who has accepted an assignment as deputy director of NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif."



27 May 2003: Marshall's new boss, Opinion, Huntsville Times

"Those close to NASA who are disappointed that Stephenson is leaving can truly take some comfort in the credentials and prospects of his successor."



27 May 2003: Chief of Staff Courtney Stadd Announces Plans to Leave Agency

"Courtney A. Stadd, NASA Chief of Staff and White House Liaison, today announced plans to leave the agency, effective July 4. Stadd, who led President Bush's NASA transition team and worked with two NASA administrators in helping to cast the strategic direction of the agency, plans to pursue opportunities in the private sector."

27 May 2003: NASA Names New Chief of Staff

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced today John Schumacher would be appointed the agency Chief of Staff. Schumacher had served as NASA's Assistant Administrator for External Relations since June 1995. He replaces Courtney Stadd, who is returning to the private sector in July."

20 May 2003: Courtney Stadd, NASA Chief of Staff to Leave Agency

Editor's note:
NASA Watch has learned that Courtney Stadd, NASA Chief of Staff, will be leaving the agency soon to pursue interests in the private sector. He will be replaced by John Schumacher, who currently serves as Assistant Administrator for External Relations. Schumacher will be replaced in turn, sources say, by Mike O'Brien, currently Deputy to Schumacher. Sources indicate other changes at NASA Headquarters and at field centers are anticipated soon.



24 May 2003: NASA's shuffling brings challenge, Huntsville Times

"Every time there's a major budget problem in Washington, the idea of closing a major NASA center is kicked around, said Keith Cowing, a former NASA manager who now runs an independent Web site, NASAwatch.com. "It's talk and that's generally all it is," Cowing said. "That seems like a way to save money quickly, but when the details get fleshed out, it just doesn't pan out that way."

23 May 2003: David A. King Named Marshall Space Flight Center Director, NASA HQ

"NASA Associate Administrator for Space Flight William F.
Readdy today named David A. King as the new center director
for the Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala. King
is currently Marshall's deputy director and will succeed
Arthur G. Stephenson when Stephenson steps down June 15."



20 May 2003: Courtney Stadd, NASA Chief of Staff to Leave Agency

Editor's note:
NASA Watch has learned that Courtney Stadd, NASA Chief of Staff, will be leaving the agency soon to pursue interests in the private sector. He will be replaced
by John Schumacher, who currently serves as Assistant Administrator for External Relations. Schumacher will be replaced in turn, sources say, by Mike O'Brien, currently Deputy to Schumacher. Sources indicate other changes at NASA Headquarters and at field centers are anticipated soon.



20 May 2003: Marshall Space Flight Center Director Steps Down, NASA HQ

"NASA Associate Administrator of Space Flight William F. Readdy today announced the reassignment of Arthur G. Stephenson,
Center Director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., effective June 15. Stephenson
decided to step down from his current position and move to an important role in promoting NASA's Education efforts until
his retirement in January 2004."

21 May 2003: Another top-level shuttle official at NASA will step down, Orlando Sentinel

"In the latest of a string of departures of top-level officials involved with the space-shuttle program, the director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center said Tuesday that he's leaving next month."



15 May 2003: X-37 management Changes at MSFC

Editor's note: Dan Dumbacher
has been named NASA Program Manager for X-37, replacing Jeff Sexton.




24 March 2003: NASA Names New Chief Information Officer

"NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe announced today, Patricia L. Dunnington is the agency's new Chief Information Officer (CIO)."



12 March 2003: NASA Names Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Flight

"NASA Deputy Administrator Frederick Gregory today announced the appointment of Lynn F.H. Cline as Deputy Associate Administrator for the Office of Space Flight. Cline previously served as NASA's Deputy Assistant Administrator for External Relations."




24 January 2003: NASA Names Deputy Associate Administrator for Education, NASA HQ

"NASA Deputy Administrator Frederick Gregory today announced the appointment of Angela Phillips Diaz as Deputy Associate Administrator for Education. Diaz had previously served as Assistant Associate Administrator for Policy & Plans in the Office of Space Flight at NASA Headquarters."




21 January 2003: OSF Key Personnel Announcement: Mark L. Uhran - Senior Systems Integration Manager for the International Space Station , NASA HQ

"Effective January 26, 2003, Mr. Mark L. Uhran will assume the position of Senior Systems Integration Manager for the International Space Station, Office of Space Flight, NASA Headquarters."



21 January 2003: Del Weathers has died.

Editor's note: Del Weathers (NASA ARC) died this past Saturday with his family at his side.

Update: Detailed information on memorial serivces and some recent photos of Del.


I worked with Del at the Space Station Freedom Program Office in Reston. While I was a "user" down the hall in Utilization and Ops, Del worked in Engineering. He often sat across the table from me when we'd play tug of war on ICDs, ACD's, and "those damn user requirements" during the innumerable redesigns we had to endure. He also sat by my side as we dueled with Level III and Level I (who never wanted to listen to any of us at Level II - especially when we were right). All the while he kept a sense of humor about him. As I recall, he also had one of the most interesting offices (reflective of his personality) - one people tended to hang out in. He will be missed.




15 January 2003: George W.S. Abbey and Charles F. Bolden Jr. Join American PureTex Water Corporation


"George W.S. Abbey has been named Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of American PureTex Water Corporation and PureTex Water Works. Charles F. Bolden Jr. has been named President and Chief Operating Officer."




14 January 2003: STS-107/Columbia Ball Strut Tie Rod Assembly Issue Chronology (includes powerpoint presentations), SpaceRef

"Over the past month NASA has been working to understand the cause of cracks found in a 2.25-inch diameter metal ball located inside the Ball Strut Tie Rod Assembly (BSTRA) of Space Shuttle Discovery's 17-inch liquid oxygen line - and what the implications are for the rest of the Orbiter fleet. What follows is a chronology of public status reports and internal briefings that describe how this issue was examined and resolved."



14 January 2003: NASA Names Associate Administrator for Technical Programs

"NASA's Deputy Administrator Fred Gregory announced the appointment of Dr. Michael A. Greenfield as Associate Deputy Administrator for Technical Programs, effective immediately. Greenfield was formerly Deputy Associate Administrator for Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA Headquarters."




25 December 2002: Roy S. Estess named recipient of space trophy, The Citizen

"Roy S. Estess, former director of the NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, is the recipient of the prestigious 2003 National Space Trophy, said officials with the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement Foundation."

"NASA's Office of the Chief Information Officer, and the Office for Public Affairs, have been directed by the Administrator to bring all public Web content and sites into the portal infrastructure and operate them through the portal's editorial process.

All NASA officials who publish, maintain, or fund such Web content are to work with the portal management team to migrate their content into the portal. NASA offices planning to develop new public content should plan to do so within the portal infrastructure."

Editor's note: Bravo!



Comments? Send them to

nasawatch@reston.com

ITAR and Inflatables

4 July 2004: Private Initiative for Inflatable Space Habitat Lures Chinese Interest, Aviation Now

"Inflatable technologies--or "expandables" as Bigelow prefers to call them--are increasingly popular, and NASA and the Defense Dept. are also potential customers for Nautilus research. As envisioned by NASA for the TransHab concept, Bigelow engineers believe the Nautilus could also be a proof-of-concept development for similar materials technologies and inflatables as habitats on the Moon as part of the new U.S. lunar/Mars manned exploration initiative."

Editor's note: One would expect that there are some nasty ITAR-related concerns just waiting to pounce on Bigelow's plans.


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