Why Send Out One Weekly Status Report When You Can Send out TWO?

Editor's note: Have a look at these two space station status reports. As is the case this week, last week - every every week, they were both issued at the end of the week by NASA JSC PAO within minutes of each other. They are virtually identical. You would think one would be sufficient - and that the first version should be sufficient - but not at NASA.

In some cases entire paragraphs are identical. In all other cases, only the first word order of the first sentence has been changed - otherwise the paragraphs are identical. With regard to the 12 January reports, the report on the left has 526 words whereas the one on the right has 408 words. The only difference that I can see between the two reports is additional verbiage in the left hand report that describes the Recharge Oxygen Orifice Bypass Assembly (ROOBA).

Which report came first? And why did the other have to be re-written? What a silly waste of resources. If Joe Davis is trying to instill some strategic thought in his "strategic communications" organization, it is certainly not evident by this needless duplication of activity.



From: info@JSC.NASA.GOV
Subject: [HSFMEDIA] International Space Station Status Report #3
Date: January 20, 2006 11:42:12 AM EST
To: HSFMEDIA@JSC-LISTSERV-01.JSC.NASA.GOV
Reply-To: HSFMEDIA@JSC-LISTSERV-01.JSC.NASA.GOV

2006
Report #3
10:30 a.m. CST, Friday, Jan. 20, 2006
Mission Control Center, Houston

Expedition 12 Commander Bill McArthur began his week Sunday by running a marathon in space.

McArthur ran a half-marathon on the station treadmill to support friends and colleagues who ran in the Houston Marathon that day. McArthur circled the globe at an altitude of 220 statute miles as runners on the ground circled Houston.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev participated with the ground flight control teams to rehearse procedures that would be used in the event a rapid cabin air leak required a station evacuation. Similar emergency procedures are practiced regularly by all station crews.

McArthur and Tokarev are also preparing for their second spacewalk. On Thursday, Mission managers decided to delay the spacewalk from Feb. 2 to Feb 3. The extra time will ease the crew's preparation schedule. Mission Control sent the crew detailed procedures for the spacewalk this week, and the crew reviewed the plans with experts on the ground. In addition, the crew began charging batteries and preparing the Pirs Docking Compartment airlock for the excursion. For the spacewalk, McArthur and Tokarev will wear Russian Orlan-M spacesuits.

During the spacewalk, the crew will move a cargo boom adapter from one module to another, install a safety bolt into a cable cutter on the Mobile Transporter truss rail car, and deploy SuitSat, an old Orlan space suit equipped with an active amateur radio transmitter. The SuitSat will remain in orbit for several weeks and allow contact with amateur radio operators on the ground.

Science operations this week included powering on a European Space Agency experiment known as Protein Crystal Growth Monitoring by Digital Holographic Microscope for the International Space Station (PROMISS-4). McArthur spent several hours setting up the Microgravity Science Glovebox and other support equipment early in the week. He then began sample processing for the PROMISS experiment in the glove box on Thursday. The experiment will investigate the growth processes of proteins during weightless conditions using advanced imaging methods such as digital holography.

McArthur and Tokarev took time out from their duties on Friday to answer questions posed by students at the Kuss Middle School in Fall River, Mass.

For information about crew activities, future launch dates and station sighting opportunities on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home

###

NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Status Reports and other information are available automatically by sending an Internet electronic mail message to listserv@listserver.jsc.nasa.gov. In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type "subscribe hsfnews" (no quotes). This will add the e-mail address that sent the subscribe message to the news release distributi on list. The system will reply with a confirmation via e-mail of each subscription. Once you have subscribed you will receive future news releases via e-mail.


From: hqnews@mediaservices.nasa.gov
Subject: International Space Station Status Report: SS06-003
Date: January 20, 2006 11:36:25 AM EST
To: hqnews@mediaservices.nasa.gov

Jan. 20, 2006
J.D. Harrington Headquarters, Washington (202) 358-5241
James Hartsfield Johnson Space Center, Houston (281) 483-5111

STATUS REPORT: SS06-003
INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION STATUS REPORT: SS06-003

Expedition 12 Commander Bill McArthur began his week Sunday by running a half-marathon on the station treadmill, supporting friends and colleagues running in the Houston Marathon. As he ran 220 miles above the Earth on board the station, the runners circled Houston.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, McArthur, Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev and ground flight control teams rehearsed procedures for a rapid cabin air leak requiring station evacuation. Similar emergency procedures are regularly practiced by all station crews.

The crew is preparing for their second spacewalk. On Thursday, mission managers decided to delay the spacewalk from Feb. 2 to Feb. 3 to ease the crew's preparation schedule. Mission Control sent the crew detailed procedures for the spacewalk this week, and they reviewed them with experts on the ground. The crew began charging batteries and preparing the Pirs Docking Compartment airlock for the excursion. For the spacewalk, they will wear Russian Orlan-M spacesuits.

During the spacewalk, the crew will move a cargo boom adapter from one module to another; install a safety bolt into a cable cutter on the Mobile Transporter truss rail car; and deploy SuitSat, an old Orlan space suit equipped with an active amateur radio transmitter. SuitSat will remain in orbit for several weeks and allow contact with amateur radio operators on the ground.

Science operations this week included powering on the European Space Agency Protein Crystal Growth Monitoring by Digital Holographic Microscope for the International Space Station (PROMISS-4) experiment.

McArthur spent several hours setting up the Microgravity Science Glovebox and other support equipment early in the week. He began sample processing for the PROMISS experiment in the glove box on Thursday. The experiment will investigate the growth processes of proteins during weightless conditions using advanced imaging methods such as digital holography.

McArthur and Tokarev took time out from their duties on Friday to answer questions from students at the Kuss Middle School in Fall River, Mass.

For information about crew activities, future launch dates and station sighting opportunities on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home



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2006
Report #2
3 p.m. CST, Friday, Jan. 13, 2006
Mission Control Center, Houston

Jan. 13, 2006
J.D. Harrington, Headquarters, Washington, (202) 358-5241
James Hartsfield, Johnson Space Center, Houston, (281) 483-5111
INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION STATUS REPORT: SS06-002

The International Space Station crew this week installed an upgrade that will conserve oxygen during spacewalks, moved the station robotic arm to prepare for their next spacewalk, and began an experiment that studies body movements.

Expedition 12 Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev had Monday off to observe the end of the Russian Christmas holidays. Completing an important upgrade to the station's spacewalk preparation systems, McArthur and Tokarev installed the Recharge Oxygen Orifice Bypass Assembly (ROOBA) later in the week. The assembly will conserve station oxygen during spacewalk preparations when the space shuttle is docked to the complex. It allows crew members to prebreathe oxygen from the shuttle rather than use oxygen from station tanks as they prepare for a spacewalk. Crew members must prebreathe pure oxygen for an extended period before beginning a spacewalk to prevent decompression sickness. The new system will be used during the next shuttle mission.

Initiating work with the scientific investigation for Expedition 12, McArthur put on customized Lycra cycling tights this week for a session of the Foot/Ground Reaction Forces during Spaceflight, or FOOT experiment. FOOT investigates the differences between use of the body's lower extremities on Earth and in space. McArthur wore the instrumented garb to measure joint angles, muscle activity and forces on his feet during daily activities.

On Thursday, McArthur maneuvered the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to provide television views of an Interface Umbilical Assembly (IUA). The assembly houses a contingency cable cutter for a line that provides power, data and video to the station's Mobile Transporter. The Mobile Transporter is a rail car on which the arm may travel along the station's truss. A second, identical assembly on the other side of the transporter inadvertently cut a backup cable for the system last month. The camera views allowed engineers to survey the remaining intact assembly and cable. McArthur and Tokarev will install a safing bolt in the intact system during a Feb. 2 spacewalk.

On Friday, McArthur again maneuvered the arm, positioning cameras to survey the seal on a station port where cargo modules carried aboard the shuttle can be docked. Engineers used the view to inspect the Common Berthing Mechanism on the Unity module for possible debris. Following that, the arm was moved to another position where it will remain to provide views of the upcoming spacewalk.

The Elektron oxygen-generation system was activated this week by Tokarev after being deliberately shut off since mid-December. The Elektron was off to allow oxygen supplies from the unpiloted Progress 19 cargo carrier to be used. Tokarev also worked on a number of Russian science projects throughout the week.

Via ham radio, McArthur answered questions from students at Peterson Elementary School in his hometown of Red Springs, N.C.; and at the St. Albert the Great School in North Royalton, Ohio. He also talked with high school students in Hiroshima, Japan.

Information on the crew's activities aboard the Space Station, future launch dates, as well as Station sighting opportunities from anywhere on the Earth, is available on the Internet at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

The next station status report will be issued on Friday, Jan. 20, or earlier if events warrant.

This past week, Expedition 12 Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev completed an important upgrade to the station's spacewalk preparation systems, and installed the Recharge Oxygen Orifice Bypass Assembly.

The assembly will conserve station oxygen during spacewalk preparations when the space shuttle is docked to the complex. It allows the crew to breathe oxygen from the shuttle rather than use oxygen from station tanks, as they prepare for the spacewalk. The crew must breathe pure oxygen for an extended period before beginning a spacewalk to prevent decompression sickness. The new system will be used during the next shuttle mission.

McArthur wore customized Lycra cycling tights for a session of the Foot/Ground Reaction Forces during Spaceflight (FOOT) experiment. FOOT investigates the differences between use of the body's lower extremities on Earth and in space. McArthur wore the instrumented garb to measure joint angles, muscle activity, and forces on his feet during daily activities.

On Thursday, McArthur maneuvered the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to provide TV images of an interface umbilical assembly. The assembly houses a contingency cable cutter for a line that provides power, data and video to the station's Mobile Transporter. The transporter is a rail car that travels along the station's truss. A second identical assembly on the other side of the transporter inadvertently cut a backup cable for the system last month. The camera views allowed engineers to survey the remaining intact assembly and cable. The crew will install a safety bolt in the intact system during a Feb. 2 spacewalk.

McArthur also maneuvered the arm, positioning cameras to survey a station port seal where shuttle cargo modules dock. Engineers used the view to inspect the Common Berthing Mechanism on the Unity module for possible debris, and then the arm was positioned to provide views of the upcoming spacewalk.

The Elektron oxygen-generation system was activated by Tokarev after being deliberately shut off in mid-December. The Elektron was turned off to use the oxygen supplies aboard the first of two Progress cargo carriers docked to the station. Tokarev also worked on a number of Russian science projects throughout the week.

McArthur answered student questions from Peterson Elementary School in his hometown of Red Springs, N.C. and from St. Albert the Great School in North Royalton, Ohio via ham radio. He also talked with high school students in Hiroshima, Japan.

For information about crew activities, future launch dates and station sighting opportunities on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home

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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on January 20, 2006 1:52 PM.

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