NASA's Head Is In The Sand

The Sky Is Falling, The Atlantic

"After the presentation, NASA's administrator, Michael Griffin, came into the room. I asked him why there had been no discussion of space rocks. He said, "We don't make up our goals. Congress has not instructed us to provide Earth defense. I administer the policy set by Congress and the White House, and that policy calls for a focus on return to the moon. Congress and the White House do not ask me what I think."

I asked what NASA's priorities would be if he did set the goals. "The same. Our priorities are correct now," he answered. "We are on the right path. We need to go back to the moon. We don't need a near-Earth-objects program." In a public address about a month later, Griffin said that the moon-base plan was "the finest policy framework for United States civil space activities that I have seen in 40 years."

Actually, Congress has asked NASA to pay more attention to space rocks."

- Blinding Asteroid Scientists From Seeing Threats To Earth, earlier post
- Planetary Defense - Just Send Money, earlier post
- NASA Strategic Management Council Meeting: 2006 Near-Earth Object Survey and Deflection Study, earlier post
- NASA NEO Report Update, earlier post

  • submit to reddit


Loading

Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium, May 4-6, 2021
Rich Man's Sky - Baen Books




Join our mailing list




Commercialization: Monthly Archives

Monthly Archives

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on May 14, 2008 1:50 PM.

NASA Future Forum Live in Second Life was the previous entry in this blog.

When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.