More Confusing Twitter Math From @NASA (Update)

Keith's note: Why is NASA saying that this is going to be a year-long mission? It is not. Close - but not a year. NASA goes out of their way to use simple math on Twitter to make their #YearInSpace point - but - that math also easily shows that Kelly is only going to be in space for 342 days. A year is 365 days long. I guess its too much to ask for NASA to be accurate on Twitter as it simultaneously hypes all of this STEM education stuff. Its not as if any of the 9 million Twitter followers are actually paying attention. Or are they?

Reader (Max Fagin) comment: "And actually, since the ISS will be going through two high-beta periods in the next 342 days (one in late Dec 2015, and one in early June 2016) there won't even be that many sunsets. In the 342 day period starting with the last Soyuz launch, the ISS will only see 10,372 sun-rise/set pairs." Click on image to enlarge.

Reader (Max Fagin) correction: "High-Beta periods are June and December of THIS YEAR (not 2016). And if you define a sunset/rise cycle as a complete eclipse (rather than just anytime the sun contacts the horizon), the number falls to 10356."

sunsets.jpg

Keith's update: Unlike a certain space agency, Max is quick to clarify and update inaccurate data.

@NASASocial is a Little Confused About SLS

"If the QM-1 SRB engine is going to burn for 126 seconds (per NASA) that means that 693 million pounds of propellant will be used - or 693 million tons - depending on which Tweet you believe. But wait: the whole SRB only weighs 1.6 million pounds. Hmm ... NASA's infographic says that it is only burning 5.5 tons per second. No "million" pounds or tons is mentioned. Clearly @NASASocial needs to spend a little more time reading before tweeting."

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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on March 30, 2015 4:59 PM.

Finding Tatooine Just Got A Little Easier was the previous entry in this blog.

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