NASA Can't Decide What SLS Engines It Does/Does Not Need

Decision looms on when to introduce new SLS upper stage, Spaceflight Now

"Officials initially planned to power the upper stage with a J-2X engine, a modernized powerplant based on the J-2 engine designed in the Apollo era. But managers decided the J-2X, which had roots in the canceled Constellation moon program, was overpowered for the job and sidelined the engine after a series of hotfire ground tests. NASA spent more than $1.4 billion on the J-2X engine from 2006 through 2014, an agency spokesperson said."

Using Jedi Mind Tricks to Sell NASA's Next Big Rocket (2014), earlier post

"The initial plan was to launch EM-1 with an upper stage composed of a modified Boeing Delta IV upper stage i.e. the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS). After trying this for several years, and spending $400 million or so, NASA realized that this was not going to work. So they are going to ask Boeing to deliver a standard Delta IV upper stage and use that. NASA then wants to commence work on a 4 engine Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) that will only be used a few times."

NASA Set for New Round Of J-2X Testing at Stennis Space Center, (2013) earlier post

"NASA's progress toward a return to deep space missions continues with a new round of upcoming tests on the next-generation J-2X rocket engine, which will help power the agency's Space Launch System (SLS) to new destinations in the solar system."

NASA OIG: Final Memorandum on the Review of NASA's Plan to Build the A-3 Facility for Rocket Propulsion Testing (2008), earlier posting

"We found that NASA's Upper Stage Engine (USE) Element Manager, located at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, reviewed the J-2X rocket propulsion testing options and selected the A-3 test stand to be built at Stennis without the required formal reviews or recommendations of the NRPTA, or NASA's RPTMB."

NASA OIG: NASA's Decision Process for Conducting Space Launch System Core Stage Testing at Stennis, (2014) earlier post

"Similar to the OIG's conclusions 5 years ago, the OIG found that NASA failed to follow its internal policies or its agreement with the DOD when it decided to spend approximately $352 million to refurbish and test the SLS core stage on the B-2 test stand at Stennis."

NASA Has No Clear Use for the J-2X That It Once Needed, earlier post

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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on September 8, 2015 9:58 PM.

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