The International Space Station Offers Lessons For Living On Earth

Keith's note: Jim Banke just pointed out this transcript of an NBC interview with Putin wherein he talked about space and NASA quite a bit. This is a translation so it is not precise. But it does show the pattern that Russia often uses i.e. 'two steps forward, one step back'. First Rogozin goes on the attack to see how far he can push the U.S - in this case, NASA, and then Putin dials it back by 80% or so. But that still leaves Rogozin 20% to work with. Everyone in the space world is used to this by now.

Something to ponder: despite decades of whiplash from ever-changing U.S./Russian squabbles, the International Space Station has managed to survive and thrive amidst this chaos. Even when both countries engage in tit for tat sanctions - and hurl accusations - the ISS seems to be immune from this. Indeed, there is clearly a tacit acceptance by all parties that the cooperative ventures on ISS are simply too important to disrupt for petty political reasons even when things get really bad back on Earth. Yes, we lean in that direction everyone once in a while, but it is quickly dialed back once people calm down.

As I am fond of saying, perhaps living in space can teach us all some lessons on how to live and work together on Earth. China is about to launch a crew to its new space station. Russia wants to work with them and China wants to work with the U.S. I will be on CGTN at some point today and I will say that exact same thing - as I have many times before.

"VLADIMIR PUTIN: Well, honestly, I don't think that Mr. Rogozin, that is the name of the head of-- Roscosmos, has threatened anyone in this regard. I've known him for many years, and I know that he is a supporter-- he is a supporter of expanding the relationship with the U.S. in this area, in space. Recently, the head of NASA spoke in the same vein. And I personally fully support this. And we have been working with great pleasure all of these years, and we're prepared to continue to work. For technical reasons though, and that's a different matter, is that the International Space Station is-- coming to an end of its service life. And maybe in this-- regard, the Roscosmos does not have plans to continue their work. However-- based on what I heard from-- our U.S. partners they, too, are looking at future cooperation in this particular segment in their certain-- in a certain way. But on the whole, the-- cooperation between our two countries in space is a great example of a situation where despite any kind of problems in political relationships in recent years, it's an area where we have been able to maintain and preserve the partnership and both parties cherish it. I think you just misunderstood the head of the-- Russian space program said. We are interested in continuing to work with the U.S. in this direction, and we will continue to do so if our U.S. partners don't refuse to-- to-- to do that. It doesn't mean that we need to work exclusively with the U.S. We-- have been working and will continue to work with China, which applies to all kinds of programs, including-- exploring deep space. And-- I think there is nothing but --positive information here. I-- frankly, I don't see any ex-- any-- contradictions here. I don't think any mutual-- exclusivity here."
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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on June 16, 2021 10:17 AM.

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