Apollo: September 2018 Archives

Keith's note: I am sick and tired of getting emails from conspiracy mongering idiots who think that there has been some sort of massive left wing revisionist editing of history in "First Man" whereby American flags have been erased from history. Contrary to modern style, back in 1969, not every piece of official astronaut work clothing had American flags on them. I am certain NASAWatch readers can find more examples. This took me 2 minutes using Google.

Keith's note: Repeating Apollo would be a mistake, But evoking the excitement of that era would not be incorrect.

The lunar flag-planting was no big deal. Leaving it out of the movie is no big deal too., opinion by Homer Hickam, Washington Post

"The history here is instructive. Although the lunar flag-planting may seem like a given in hindsight, for months before the flight of Apollo 11 there was a debate within the federal government and in the press as to the wisdom of doing it. The argument for the flag was that the voyage was an entirely American effort that was paid for by American taxpayers, who deserved to see their flag planted in the lunar regolith. The argument against was that it could cast the landing in the eyes of the world as a nationalistic exercise, diminishing what was otherwise indisputably a triumph of American values and ideals, not to mention a demonstration of our technical superiority over our great adversary, the Soviet Union. Ultimately, just a few months before the flight, Congress ordered NASA to put up the flag. The result, a rushed bit of engineering, was a set of spindly tubes holding a government-issued flag valued at around $5 and, since there was no room in the moon lander, flown clamped to a leg of the vehicle. Armstrong and Aldrin put up the flag and saluted it, then got on to other business."

Statement by Rick and Mark Armstrong and James Hansen Regarding "First Man"

"Although Neil didn't see himself that way, he was an American hero. But he was also an engineer and a pilot, a father and a friend, a man suffered privately through great tragedies with incredible grace. This is why, though there are numerous shots of the American flag on the moon, the filmmakers chose to focus on Neil looking back at the earth, his walk to Little West Crater, his unique, personal experience of completing this journey that has seen so many incredible highs and devastating lows. In short, we do not feel this movie anti-American in the slightest. Quite the opposite. But don't take our word for it. We'd encourage everyone to go see this remarkable film and see for themselves."


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This page is an archive of entries in the Apollo category from September 2018.

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