Astronauts: January 2017 Archives

Scott Parazynski: Still on Cloud 10 on the summit of Mt. Everest, SpaceRef

"I tied off a pair of flags I'd made to honor astronauts and cosmonauts who had perished in the line of duty (Apollo 1, Challenger, Columbia, Soyuz 1 and Soyuz 11), as I could think of no finer place on Earth to hang them. In the coming days, weeks, months and years, like their Tibetan prayer flag counterparts, they will weather under the wind, sun and snow, and slowly lift back up into the heavens."

Arctic Memorials and Starship Yearnings, SpaceRef

"Given the sheer mass of the structure, and the slow manner with which things change here, this inukshuk may well be standing 500 years from now. That should be long enough. Maybe someone serving on a starship will think to visit it."

Ancient Memorials for Modern Space Explorers, SpaceRef

"A week prior to my departure I got a call from June Scobee Rodgers, the widow of Challenger's commander Dick Scobee. She was thrilled with what we were doing and asked if we'd like to place a few mementos in the inukshuk. She then described what she was sending. A day or so later a package arrived. As I opened it I told my wife, with a bit of a tear in my eye, "this is history". I had been sent one of the few items Dick Scobee had left in his briefcase when he took off for his last mission: a business card and a mission lapel pin. I am certain that his family has so little in the way of such items. As such I was really honored that the family had chosen this inukshuk we planned to build on Devon Island, as the place where such precious items would rest."

Challenger

Remembering the Challenger Crew, Challenger Center for Space Science Education

"On this day 31 years ago, Space Shuttle Challenger and its seven-member crew were tragically lost. The crew members - Dick Scobee, Gregory Jarvis, Christa McAuliffe, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik, and Michael J. Smith - were part of the first Teacher in Space Project. Challenger Center, formed by the families of the crew, is dedicated to the educational spirit of their mission. Every year, together with our 43 Challenger Learning Centers, we provide more than 250,000 students with the opportunity to become scientists, engineers, and innovators through unique education experiences."

Apollo 1

NASA Unveils Tribute to Crew of Apollo 1

"A new tribute opened Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, dedicated to the lives, accomplishments and memories of the three astronauts who perished 50 years ago in a launch pad fire while training for the flight of Apollo 1. The tribute exhibit stands only a few miles from the long-abandoned Launch Complex 34, the launch pad where the fire took place. The pad was dismantled in 1968 after the launch of Apollo 7."

'We have a fire in the cockpit!' The Apollo 1 disaster 50 years later, Washington Post

"The fire made NASA personnel more aware and focused on "quality control," said Charlie Duke, another astronaut. [Walt] Cunningham, who was on the backup crew, said it didn't really change him as an astronaut, but "may have given me a little bit more mental commitment to not go along with some of the things on the design, and what-have-you." After the fire, Sieck said, personnel did speak up more. "There was a lot more questioning of, 'well, please explain this to me,'" Sieck said. "'I see what's here, I hear what you're saying, but tell me more. I don't totally understand it.'" It was a lesson NASA would have to learn again after the space shuttle Challenger disaster. And again after the space shuttle Columbia disaster."

Keith's note: Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson will re-introduce Bipartisan Apollo 1 Memorial Act today at 2:00 pm ET toay. Additional co-sponsors are needed. Spread the word.

Additional Cosponsors Sought For Apollo 1 Arlington Memorial Legislation, earlier post

Gene Cernan

Family Statement Regarding the Passing of Apollo Astronaut Eugene Cernan, Last Man to Walk on the Moon

"The family of Apollo Astronaut Capt. Eugene Cernan, the last man to walk on the Moon, announced that he passed away today following ongoing health issues. "It is with very deep sadness that we share the loss of our beloved husband and father," said Cernan's family. "Our family is heartbroken, of course, and we truly appreciate everyone's thoughts and prayers. Gene, as he was known by so many, was a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend." "Even at the age of 82, Gene was passionate about sharing his desire to see the continued human exploration of space and encouraged our nation's leaders and young people to not let him remain the last man to walk on the Moon," the family continued."

NASA Administrator Reflects on Legacy of Last Man to Walk on Moon

NASA Reflects on Legacy of Eugene Cernan and Other Videos


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This page is an archive of entries in the Astronauts category from January 2017.

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