Biden Space: May 2021 Archives

Media Invited to Administrator's State of NASA Remarks on Climate, Artemis

"In his first address to the workforce, NASA Administrator Bill Nelson will discuss the agency's plans for future climate science missions, the agency's plans for a robotic and human return to the Moon through the Artemis program, and more during a State of NASA event at 3 p.m. EDT Wednesday, June 2. The event will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency's website."

Keith's note: Last week I sent an email to NASA PAO - and the AAs for Communications and STEM Education - about last week's excellent ISS event with visually and hearing impaired students. I got a partial response to my questions today. The following excerpt from the PAO response summarizes the current attitude within NASA Headquarters with regard to education.

NASAWatch: "How does this event link to the Biden/Harris Administration's education strategic plans"?
NASA PAO: "Please reach out to the White House."

In his prepared statement to the House Appropriations Committee last week Bill Nelson said "strengthening of a diverse Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) workforce that inspires future generations."

In his State of the Union Address President Biden said "To win that competition for the future, in my view, we also need to make a once-in-a-generation investment in our families and our children. That's why I've introduced the American Families Plan tonight, which addresses four of the biggest challenges facing American families and, in turn, America. First is access to a good education. When this nation made 12 years of public education universal in the last century, it made us the best-educated, best-prepared nation in the world. It's, I believe, the overwhelming reason that propelled us to where we got in the 21st -- in the 20th century."

So ... despite the strong, clear, relentless push for education from the Biden/Harris Administration - with a education PhD on call 24/7/365 no less - and continuous statements by the NASA Administrator and other officials about the importance of education, NASA's answer is "Please reach out to the White House"? Seriously? Is no one at NASA paying attention to what the White House has been saying such that they can't even answer such a simple, basic question?

Keith's 4:12 pm EDT update: I just got the press release by email. It was sent out at 3:47 pm EDT. The Washington Post had an article posted at 12:21 pm EDT and then followed that with a tweet about this news while NASA said nothing whatsoever in advance. One would assume that this press release was in the can before the event happened. So why sit on it for 4 hours? Clearly these's a little favoritism going on here. NASA picks the preferred outlets while ignoring everyone else.

Alas, someone from PAO will try and tell me that this was a White House thing etc. etc. which is just silly DC inside the Beltway nonsense. The event aired on C-SPAN. NASA could have used that stream. But they did not. Will NASA TV show it? Doubtful. NASA reacts to news. They do not know how to strategically prepare, manage, and present it.

Biden Administration Invests $1 Billion To Protect Communities, Families, and Businesses Before Disaster Strikes, White House

"In advance of the President's visit, the Administration is announcing it will direct $1 billion for communities, states, and Tribal governments into pre-disaster mitigation resources to prepare for extreme weather events and other disasters, and the Administration is announcing the development of next generation climate data systems at NASA to help understand and track how climate change is impacting communities. ... Develop and launch a new NASA mission concept for an Earth System Observatory. As the number of extreme weather events increases due to climate change, the ability to forecast and monitor natural disasters is integral for the nation's preparation, mitigation, and resilience. NASA's Earth System Observatory will be a new architecture of advanced spaceborne Earth observation systems, providing the world with an unprecedented understanding of the critical interactions between Earth's atmosphere, land, ocean, and ice processes. These processes determine how the changing climate will play out at regional and local levels, on near and long-term time scales."

Keith's 2:52 pm EDT note: Not a peep from NASA about any of this White House announcement. Baffling.

Keith's note: The nomination hearing for Pam Melroy to become Deputy Administrator of NASA is supposed to begin at 10:15 am EDT.

You can watch live here at Congress and here at NASA.

Testimony of Colonel Pamela Melroy Before The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation May 20, 2021

"NASA is unique because its programs are awe-inspiring and have the potential to fundamentally change humanity's understanding of the universe. NASA's role is collecting data about the Earth system and understanding the effects of climate change will be essential to those tasked with determining policy. If confirmed as Deputy Administrator, I will work closely with NOAA and ensure a robust program of Earth data collection and dissemination."

House Appropriations CJS subcommittee Hearing: FY 2022 Budget Request for NASA

Keith's note: This is the first time that NASA Administrator Senator Astronaut Bill Nelson faces Congress. There is no mention made of the hearing on the NASA TV calendar. But wait - the NASA TV site says it will air the hearing at 2:00 pm. So much for the accuracy of the NASA TV calendar I suppose.

Keith's note: The House Science Committee held a hearing today "NASA's Earth Science and Climate Change Activities: Current Roles and Future Opportunities". Given the importance placed by the Biden Administration on Climate Change - with NASA being a member of the Cabinet-level Climate Task Force - you'd think that NASA would be giving a hearing on climate change - with the head of its Earth Science Division and its Task Force representative - some serious visibility. Guess again. No mention on the NASA TV schedule. no media advisory or press release, nothing on the sparse NASA calendar. But they did tweet about the hearing but only an hour before it began. Gavin Schmidt made a point of tweeting as well. As for the NASA Office of Legislative Affairs - don't bother - all they have is the AA's biography and a picture.

So unless you saw these tweets this morning, you probably missed mention of this hearing. Now that the hearing is over, you'd think that NASA might post a link to the archived video and the testimony of its employees. Guess again. NASA PAO is a sleep at the wheel. So here's what you missed.

Statements:
- Chairwoman Johnson Opening Statement for Hearing on Earth Science and Climate Change Activities at NASA
- Chairman Beyer Opening Statement for Hearing on Earth Science and Climate Change Activities at NASA
- Babin Opening Statement at Subcommittee Hearing on NASA Earth Science and Climate Data
- Karen M. St. Germain, Division Director, Earth Sciences Division, Science Mission Directorate, NASA
- Gavin Schmidt, Senior Climate Advisor (Acting) and Director of Goddard Institute for Space Studies, NASA
- Riley Duren, Research Scientist, Office of Research, Innovation, and Impact, University of Arizona; Chief Executive Officer, Carbon Mapper, Inc.
- Robbie Schingler, Co-Founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Planet

Keith's note: If you have been watching the space-themed photo ops fro the Oval office you have no doubt seen the Moon rock that President Biden likes to point at on the shelf. NASA can't get enough of that Moon rock love either. Bill Nelson was sworn in next to it.

Imagine what your average citizen might do to find out more about that Moon rock after seeing something on TV or on social media or reading about it in a news paper. They'd go to NASA.gov. There is no picture of the Moon rock and Biden - but look, there is a search box, let's use that. Guess what happens when you search for "Biden moon rock" and "Biden moonrock". Nothing. When you search for "Biden Moon" you get a bunch of search results from the time when Biden was vice president. Of course if you go to Google and search zillions of pictures show up instantly.

You'd think that someone in NASA PAO would have the smarts to adjust the search engine for obvious searches such that things that real people are interested in might show up in a search engine - especially when no obvious mention is made on the NASA home page. I know that they can do this since they have made adjustments to search results to feature items after some of my earlier posts. This might be a good one to feature.

Keith's note: These are some of the articles - with links to research publications - in this past week's NASA Spaceline Current Awareness List #949 14 May 2021 (Space Life Science Research Results)

As you can see, this is a rather broad array of topics with direct relevance to this whole exploration of space thing that NASA talks about. And the folks who edit this resource put a quality list like this out every week. But unless you know precisely where to look for it - or read our SpaceRef website (which has the only complete archive going back to the 1990s)- you'd never learn about this NASA-related and sponsored research.

- Planetary extravehicular activity (EVA) risk mitigation strategies for long-duration space missions.
- Rad-Bio-App: A discovery environment for biologists to explore spaceflight-related radiation exposures.
- DNA microarray analysis of gene expression of etiolated maize seedlings grown under microgravity conditions in space: Relevance to the International Space Station experiment "Auxin Transport."
- Persistent deterioration of visuospatial performance in spaceflight.
- On the challenges of anesthesia and surgery during interplanetary spaceflight.
- Biomaterials for human space exploration: A review of their untapped potential.
- Revival of anhydrobiotic cyanobacterium biofilms exposed to space vacuum and prolonged dryness: Implications for future missions beyond low Earth orbit.
- Sharp changes in muscle tone in humans under simulated microgravity.
- Gravity threshold and dose response relationships: Health benefits using a short arm human centrifuge.

As I noted a week ago in "Biden Says #ScienceIsBack - But Its Hard To Find It At NASA" NASA makes no mention of this NASA-funded resource anywhere within its Human Space Flight or ISS Space Station webpages. CASIS ignores it too on the ISS National Lab website. In addition, various NASA pages that list research resources ignore it too. And when you tell NASA about this serious omission (which I have done multiple times over the years) they just do-not-care.

I used to just chalk this off to laziness on the part of the responsible offices at NASA. Its now starting to look like willful neglect. There was a Scientific Integrity Task Force meeting today. NASA is a member. The Biden Administration talks incessantly about #ScienceIsBack. Meanwhile, at NASA, #ScienceIsLost.

The White House Announces Scientific Integrity Task Force Formal Launch and Co-Chairs

"Convening for the first time on Friday, May 14, the 46-member Task Force - including 44 from across the federal government and two leaders from OSTP - will begin its work in responding to President Biden's call to action to strengthen federal science in his Memorandum on Restoring Trust in Government Through Scientific Integrity and Evidence-Based Policymaking."

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee Members Statement on Scientific Integrity Task Force, House Science Committee

"We are encouraged by the Biden Administration's quick action to restore scientific integrity in our federal research enterprise and we look forward to the results of today's initial meeting of this critical taskforce. Science does not have a political agenda. When science is done well, it is because trained professionals can follow the data and subject their findings to rigorous peer review."

Keith's note: NASA is a member of the Task Force. I wonder who they sent to the meeting. NASA has made no mention of this committee since its formation. The Biden Administration talks about "whole of government" approaches however NASA does not seem to be interested in talking about that sort of stuff even though everyone else seems to be.

Keith's note: The news that the White House wants to name former Rep. Kendra Horn to be executive Secretary of the National Space Council was not exactly thrilled a lot of people. In case you weren't paying attention, with Horn at the helm of the National Space Council, Big Aerospace and its allies would now be in control of NASA and the National Space Council. Her support for H.R. 5666 would have resulted in a government-only lunar program which would have favored the likes of Boeing, Lockheed Martin, etc. Now that the whole Artemis thing is up for some re-thinking who knows where the National Space Council and its Users Advisory Group might decide to steer it.

It is still unclear as to the exact pecking order that will be in place with regard to space policy and PCAST (President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology) and OSTP (White House Office of Science and Technology), the National Space Council/Users Advisory Group; the National Security Council, and the Vice President's office. Right now it seems that PCAST/OSTP is on one side and interacts with the President, while National Space Council is on the other answering to the Vice President, while the National Security Council off in their own bubble interacting directly with the President. There are no straight lines in this management chart.

It seems from sources that main White House force behind the idea of appointing Kendra Horn to be Executive Secretary of the National Space Council is Cedric Richmond, Senior Advisor and Director of the Office of Public Engagement. Richmond and Horn are personal friends, sources report. But why, you may ask, is he (or anyone else in the White House) making a previously apolitical position into a political one when much more qualified professionals could have been considered? I am now starting to hear doubts and disturbance in The Force emerge up within the White House/Space bubble that the Kendra Horn thing may not necessarily be a done deal after all. Not everyone inside the space bubble is happy about this. No formal press statement from the Vice President's office has been issued - yet. So stay tuned.

Keith's update: I tweeted "chair" when I meant type "executive secretary. Sorry. My phone woke me at 5:30 am and my fat fingers and sleepy brain made me type the wrong title. Horn was defeated after only one term in Congress. Horn is a big fan of coal and gas (She represented Oklahoma) and not so much of a supporter of dealing with climate change (Biden is), she used to work for the Space Foundation, and is known to be a big fan of Boeing.

Freshman Democrat runs as defender of oil and gas industry to hold Oklahoma district, Washington Examiner

"Horn said she does not support plans proposed by former Vice President Joe Biden and House Democratic leaders to eliminate carbon emissions from the power sector within 15 or 20 years through a clean electricity standard or mandate."

NASA Announces New Associate Administrator, NASA

"NASA Administrator Sen. Bill Nelson announced Monday Robert D. Cabana, who has served as director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida since 2008, will serve as associate administrator effective Monday, May 17. Steve Jurczyk, who held the position since 2018, announced his retirement Monday."

Jurczyk Retires as NASA Associate Administrator, NASA

"Steve Jurczyk, who served as acting NASA administrator from Jan. 20 to May 3, 2021, announced Monday he will retire on Friday, May 14, after more than three decades of service at NASA."

Keith's note: Meanwhile talk in the hallways is that Bill Nelson wants everyone to call him "NASA Administrator Senator Bill Nelson". Why not include "congressman", "astronaut", and "Ballast" - his other three honorifics i.e. "NASA Administrator Senator Congressman Astronaut Bill "Ballast" Nelson."? Funny, no one ever referred to NASA Administrator Lt Commander Congressman Jim Bridenstine, NASA Administrator Major General Charlie Bolden, or NASA Administrator Hon. Secretary Sean O'Keefe. etc. Then of course we can expect to be hearing about NASA Associate Administrator Colonel Director Bob Cabana too. Meanwhile I suspect that Pam Melroy will be more interested in getting actual work done than titles.

Keith's note: As a one-time actual space biologist at NASA I find posting of research data online to be one of the most important things NASA can do to show the value - and availability - of research done on the ISS. NASA has been generating research papers for more than half a century. One very useful resource is NASA Spaceline, a regular (now weekly) NASA-funded summary of research sponsored by and relevant to NASA life science research. Here is the latest issue issued today - we post it within minutes of its arrival by email on Fridays.

Look at the good stuff in this issue: "Changes in the optic nerve head and choroid over 1 year of spaceflight"; "Draft genome sequences of various bacterial phyla isolated from the International Space Station"; "The individual and combined effects of spaceflight radiation and microgravity on biologic systems and functional outcomes."; "Everything you wanted to know about space radiation but were afraid to ask"; and "Fusarium oxysporum as an opportunistic fungal pathogen on Zinnia hybrida plants grown on board the International Space Station". That's just this issue alone - space biology, space medicine, radiation physiology, plant physiology, genomics. Each issue is like a weekly textbook on space life science. There's even astrobiology and microgravity science included as well.

NASA has paid someone to produce this research summary for years. There have been gaps due to funding lapses and our SpaceRef website has the only complete archive online here going back to the 1990s. We have been posting it religiously over the decades. Currently you can find and subscribe to this summary at NASA: SPACELINE Current Awareness - NASA Task Book. You'd think that NASA would go out if its way to be certain that all of its space station and space life science research websites would feature it prominently.

Guess again. They ignore it - systematically. There is no mention of - or links to - Spaceline at:

- NASA PubSpace (a linkage to NIH PubMed which has now been dissolved)
- NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program
- NASA SMD Biological & Physical Sciences
- CASIS/ISS National Lab
- NASA Space Station Homepage
- NASA GeneLab
- Life Sciences Data Archive, NASA JSC
- Space Station Research Explorer
- International Space Station National Laboratory

Oh yes - most of the inter-related and duplicative resources listed above don't even link to each other either - but there is another story coming on that.

If you Google "NASA science" (a thing taxpayers might just do) you get sent to this Science Mission Directorate page. If you look at the "topics" menu you see no mention of "biology", "life science", "astrobiology" or "microgravity" - even though all of this research is now housed at SMD. If you click on "missions" you get nothing related to these topics. If you click on "for researchers" and then "Science Data" there is no mention of Spaceline or any of these topics either. And so on.

If you search NASA.gov you can't find any mention of Spaceline.

NASA apparently doesn't have any interest in making this voluminous reference to science accomplished on ISS and in related fields available - if for no other reason than to refute those who would say that nothing of value is conducted on the ISS.

Oddly as NASA ignores things like Spaceline, they do like to jump up and down and tell you about all of the amazing research they want to do on the ISS to solve all of humanity's problems. In recent budget briefings to Congress NASA mentions how they want to ramp up ISS utilization in the coming years. Of course this is a good idea since the potential of this amazing facility has yet to be tapped. And now they want to sell you a bunch of ISS replacements where more of this science goodness will be carried out - and wait there's more: they want to do some on the Moon and in a mini Lunar space Station called Gateway too. Alas, given the way that NASA handles the dissemination of research results such as Spaceline this will simply mean that more important and interesting research will continue to be ignored. But NASA still wants you to fall for all the science justifications they claim to have.

And then there is the dysfunctional relationship regarding space station utilization between CASIS/ISSNL, NASA's ISS Program Office, HEOMD and SMD - but I'll address that in a future posting.

Newsflash NASA: according to Team Biden #ScienceIsBack - even if you can't find it at NASA.


Larger image

In Biden's infrastructure moonshot, a big question: Can the nation still achieve its highest ambitions?, Washington Post

"NASA just landed on Mars and we had a big vaccine," said Costa Samaras, who worked as a transportation engineer in New York City and now studies infrastructure resilience at Carnegie Mellon University. "We can do big things -- but we should be doing big things in infrastructure, right?"

Keith's note: There it is. Washington Post - the main newspaper read in the nation's capital. Big color picture - front page, above the fold, third paragraph. If no one reads the rest of the story they see NASA mentioned by a regular citizen in terms of great things that America does. This echoes the frequent mention of NASA by President Biden and Vice President Harris as well as his choice of the phrase "Cancer Moonshot" to represent an effort he led as vice president to fight cancer. Joe Biden thinks about NASA a lot it would seem.

Biden thinks about reinvigorating the nation after the pandemic and not an hour goes by without official use of the word "infrastructure". His administration talks about a  "whole of government" approach to solving the issues facing America. NASA is just another Federal agency - one that is supposedly going to be part of this whole #BuildBackBetter thing that we hear Team Biden talk about.

NASA trips over itself with giggling enthusiasm every time NASA and space get mentioned by this White House - especially when the Oval Office Moon rock gets a photo op. That's natural and it feels good to see NASA get some face time at the White House - especially when the previous Administration used NASA as a cheap prop in a never-ending political campaign circus. 

However, what NASA does not do after it gets some love from Team Biden is show that it is part of a whole of government approach - not just to post-pandemic issues and #BuildBackBetter. NASA has a bad history of shunning external, shoulder-to-shoulder, cross-government efforts. It just wants the money to do the space thing - and see ya'. 

NASA could follow up these social and broadcast moments by having a developing effort in place that show just how NASA is or will be involved in #BuildBackBetter and its cousin #ScienceIsBack. There should be talking points that point out what NASA does alone or with other entities to get things rolling again:

Aeronautics - NASA is a go-to agency for aircraft design, safety, fuel efficiency, and overall air system health. It is the only top level agency with the word "aeronautics" in its name. With the airline industry suffering now more than ever it needs to work smarter. And the infrastructure that tracks aircraft will be called on more than ever to perform flawlessly. Add in drones for delivery and remote sensing and the skies will need as much smart thinking as they can get. NASA does those things. It even flies helicopters on another planet.

Earth Science - NASA is now a member of the Climate Task Force and is one of the world's leading developers and operators of satellites that monitor weather (which can damage infrastructure); Climate change (which needs to be characterized so as to modify infrastructure); and land use and agriculture (the underpinnings of our economy).

Information Science - NASA operates some of the largest supercomputers on Earth. They are often used to tackle problems related to climate and aeronautics but also issues beyond NASA's usual portfolio. Satellite communications and embedded computing can make existing and rebuilt infrastructure more efficient than it has ever been.

Space Technology - NASA not only covers every aspect of how we use space to conduct our daily lives. Indeed,  NASA invented much of that technology. You should know all of the talking points by now - from weather forecasting to communications.

Commercial Space - by embracing the use of the private sector to do things that were once only the responsibility of government, NASA has helped to spawn whole new industries to build, launch, operate, and benefit from space technology. Seed money used by NASA has now been amplified well beyond the specific services that were sought. ANd this has only shown signs of accelerating. This growing sector pushes the need for infrastructure and a  skilled workforce. 

Science - this Administration has an unabashed love affair with all things science. NASA is probably one of the few government agencies that has a hand in every conceivable aspect of science - both basic and applied. Its investments and results have led and will continue to lead to innumerable advances - and nothing works better than an infrastructure that is better than the one it is replacing.

And so on and so on. You know the drill. But NASA is not promoting any of this now. It is sitting on its hands hoping that they get a little love note from the white House once a week and some nice presents under the tree in the FY 23 budget pass back.

But there is one thing that is often neglected since NASA people seem to assume that everyone already gets it and that they can just sit back now and wait for a nice fat budget from Congress: Inspiration.

Inspiration - this is an intangible. It is not written down anywhere, It is not in a charter, not in a strategic plan, not on an action item list. But it is as real as anything else and often vastly more pervasive and influential than the specifics of what NASA does. Often times, as was quoted in the Washington Post today, when someone wants to express a place - a mindset - a team - an idea - a meme - wherein everything our nation does comes together in a spectacular way - a way that no one else can do - even if they lack all of the specifics - they always seem to cite NASA. NASA has a grasp on our collective imagination and a global branding reach that is beyond what NASA itself seems to understand. 

And yet NASA wastes that "reach" every single day. Its public affairs, education, and outreach infrastructure are badly managed, duplicative, incapable of adequately sharing NASA's good news, and often grossly out of step with the real world. Moreover, NASA does not have a strategic plan - one written so that actual humans can understand it. As such when you ask NASA what it does and why it does it, well, NASA really drops the ball here - at the precise place where the agency's value could be sold in a "value proposition" to someone.

NASA's ability to explain itself is ill-equipped to meet the challenge that the White House is issuing to the whole of government. It is time for NASA to get off its ass, fix what is broken, and use this utterly unique gift of innovation, exploration and inspiration to its fullest potential. Not just to fund space things - but to help show everyone in America - and also around the world - that there is a way out of this collective funk and that nothing is impossible, as our President keeps saying, and that NASA is part of the best that our nation has to offer.

If NASA does not take full advantage of this golden opportunity to reinvent itself so as to become relevant again I fear that it may never get another chance.

Keith's note: In case you have not noticed the big thing on President Biden's agenda for Congress these days is INFRASTRUCTURE. A lot of NASA is falling apart. Various NASA technologies could be very useful in assessing the state of America's infrastructure. So ... I went to NASA.gov to see what NASA is doing. Nothing about infrastructure on the home page. So I used the NASA.gov search engine to see what infrastructure goodness NASA has in store when the Biden folks ask how NASA is going to help.

The top search result I got is for a NASA YouTube video titled. "Genomicic Sequencing of Outbreaks. Infrastructure, Confinement, Immune Suppression, Space Has It All". For starters the proper spelling of the key word in this title is "genomic" not "genomicic". Second of all this video has nothing to do with 'infrastructure' in the sense that the White House is interested. Third: you'd think that someone at NASA would read the newspapers and get the idea that maybe the Biden folks might be interested in infrastructure across the Federal government. Alas, NASA has never done that "whole of government" thing very well. Why start now?

NASA Names New Chief of Staff - Susie Perez Quinn

"As chief of staff, Quinn will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of NASA Headquarters. She will work with Nelson and senior NASA staff to shape the strategic direction of the agency, while overseeing and articulating various policies and programs."

Keith's 1 May note: Sources report that Susie Perez Quinn is coming to NASA to work on the 9th floor for NASA Adminstrator Bill Nelson. There will be more Nelson alumni showing up for work - a few already work at NASA - Press Secretary Jackie McGuinness and NASA Legislative Affairs AA Alicia Brown.

- @susie_quinn (Tweets are protected)
- 2017 Wall of Fame Inductee: Susie Perez Quinn, USF
- Susie Perez Quinn, LinkedIn

Keith's note: There's now an official howdy video from Bill Nelson to everyone at NASA. Note the soothing infomercial background music that is apparently designed to reassure you.

Vice President Harris Swears in NASA Administrator Sen. Bill Nelson, NASA

"As part of the swearing-in ceremony, Vice President Harris and Nelson were joined via video conference by Jim Bridenstine, who preceded Nelson as administrator, and in-person by Charles F. Bolden, who served as administrator from 2009 to 2017. Nelson's family and Pam Melroy, nominee for NASA deputy administrator, were guests at the ceremony."

Keith's note: NASA Program Executive Ezinne Uzo-Okoro is moving to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) where she will be Assistant Director of Space Policy.

- Ezinne Uzo-Okoro, LinkedIn
- ezinneinspace, Twitter

Keith's note: According to a media briefing with senior Administration officials at the White House today Bill Nelson will be sworn in on Monday by Vice President Harris - with some "special touches". The White House is in the process of searching for an executive secretary for the National Space Council. No word on when that will be announced. The White House will also be keeping the National Space Council's Users Advisory Group. VP Harris will be chairing the NSpC and will be meeting with the UAG and stakeholders as well.

Otherwise the guide word is "continuity" with regard to the overall space policy left in place by the Trump Administration -- with a focus on Biden/Harris priorities: peaceful norms of behavior in space; peaceful exploration with allies and partners; STEM education;
climate change; diversity in the workforce; regional economic development: and
ensuring cyberspace security in space activities.

According to one White House official in the briefing the Vice President's approach is going to be "to be to get the job done and not focus on big displays" which would seem to be a reference to the campaign style stunts that the Trump Administration liked to morph various space-themed meetings and events into - often with a reduced focus on actual substance.

- Sen. Bill Nelson Statement on National Space Council, NASA


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This page is an archive of entries in the Biden Space category from May 2021.

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