Budget: March 2017 Archives

OMB Budget Blueprint Excerpt for NASA

"Provides $1.8 billion for a focused, balanced Earth science portfolio that supports the priorities of the science and applications communities, a savings of $102 million from the 2017 annualized CR level. The Budget terminates four Earth science missions (PACE, OCO-3, DSCOVR Earth-viewing instruments, and CLARREO Pathfinder) and reduces funding for Earth science research grants."

Keith's note: I asked NASA PAO "Which "Earth-viewing instruments" on DSCOVR are affected by the White House Budget Blueprint? How much does it cost NASA to operate these "Earth-viewing instruments" on DSCOVR on an annual basis? Who operates these "Earth-viewing instruments" on DSCOVR? NASA? A university? A contractor? A combination thereof?"

NASA PAO replied: "NASA provided two Earth-observing instruments on the DSCOVR spacecraft: the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR). NASA funded the refurbishment and recalibration of these two instruments and is now supporting the analysis of their data. The operation of all instruments on DSCOVR is part of NOAA's responsibility as mission lead. The NASA DSCOVR budget is for EPIC and NISTAR data analysis/processing. In last year's federal budget request, NASA sought $1.7 million for this activity in FY17, $1.2 million in FY18, and $1.2 million in FY19. (See pg ES-35: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/fy_2017_budget_estimates.pdf)."

So NASA does not actually operate instruments on DSCOVR - NOAA does - but OMB wants NASA to "terminate" them anyway. And the money saved annually for NASA data analysis? $1.7 million. The cost for a single trip to Mar-a-Lago? $3 million. Priceless.

Only In Washington

Keith's note: @ChelseaClinton retweeted @NASAWatch. Oops.

OMB Budget Blueprint Excerpt for NASA

"The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is responsible for increasing understanding of the universe and our place in it, advancing America's world-leading aerospace technology, inspiring the Nation, and opening the space frontier. The Budget increases cooperation with industry through the use of public-private partnerships, focuses the Nation's efforts on deep space exploration rather than Earth-centric research, and develops technologies that would help achieve U.S. space goals and benefit the economy. The President's 2018 Budget requests $19.1 billion for NASA, a 0.8 percent decrease from the 2017 annualized CR level, with targeted increases consistent with the President's priorities."

NASA budget would cut Earth science and education, Washington Post

"President Trump's first federal budget seems to make good on his campaign promises to shift NASA's focus away from Earth and toward space. But it doesn't reveal where he thinks the agency should be headed -- to Mars, the moon or elsewhere. The total cut to the Earth-science budget is $102 million, or 5 percent of the program's annual budget, and it almost exclusively targets missions aimed at understanding climate change -- the ocean monitoring program PACE; the Orbiting Carbon ­Observatory-3; the Deep Space Climate Observatory; and the CLARREO Pathfinder, which measures heat in Earth's atmosphere. Also on the chopping block: the entire NASA Education office, which runs camps and enrichment programs, provides internships and scholarships for young scientists, and oversees efforts to support women and underrepresented minorities in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, fields."

Trump's NASA budget preserves Mars mission, cuts Earth science, asteroid trip, education, USA Today

"Trump's vision for NASA calls for some dramatic shifts from the priorities the space agency pursued under President Obama, according to a broad budget outline the White House released Thursday. Line-item details on the administration's proposed spending plan for NASA and other executive branch agencies are expected in the coming weeks."

Message From the Acting NASA Administrator: Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Request

"While more detailed budget information will be released in May, we have received a top line budget number for the agency as part of an overall government budget rollout of more than $19 billion. This is in line with our funding in recent years, and will enable us to effectively execute our core mission for the nation, even during these times of fiscal constraint. While the budget and appropriation process still has a long way to go, this budget enables us to continue our work with industry to enhance government capabilities, send humans deeper into space, continue our innovative aeronautics efforts and explore our universe."

Keith's note: NASA made out far better than other agencies. But the cuts to Earth science at NASA, NOAA and elsewhere clearly show a climate change denial trend. Equally as troubling are the cuts within agencies to education projects as well as to the education department itself. You do not need to worry about NASA Earth Science stuff being sent to NOAA since their cuts are even more extreme than NASA's. Lightfoot makes no mention whatsoever of the cuts to Earth science - he just says that "some missions are not going to go forward".

NASA's Acting Administrator also seems to think it is OK to demolish NASA's education office and that somehow NASA will make that function work elsewhere. No. There is a clear message being sent to government agencies and the White House and Congress will be watching to make sure that no education efforts are going on at NASA - just like they already make certain that NASA does not "advertise" its accomplishments to the American people.

But Robert Lightfoot wants you to think that this is all good news. NASA's leaders no longer lead. They just roll over.

Bill Nye has a few tips for President Trump on how to manage NASA, The Verge

"Nye saves his most optimistic hope for last. He argues that the Trump administration should increase NASA's budget by 5 percent each year for the next five years. That way, the agency will have the money it needs to execute its ambitious human spaceflight program and science programs. It's an incredibly hopeful thought at a time when NASA is currently working on the president's budget request for 2018. And all signs point to NASA facing a potentially large cut in its funding from the new administration. It's something that the Planetary Society is aware of. "Obviously we knew based on hints and signs that funding was going to be a challenge, but at the same time, the space community has to be honest about what it needs if it's going to succeed," says Dreier. "We should not change our message because the non-defense discretionary part of the budget may shrink. The 'five over five' plan is totally realistic in terms of overall spending."

Keith's note: All discretionary government spending faces extreme budget cuts and yet Bill Nye and The Planetary Society somehow expect NASA to be exempt from this government-wide budget reformatting effort - and get an increase - every year for 5 years - for they things that they want to be funded - all while NOAA's satellite data systems will be gutted, large number of government employees will be laid off, and tens of millions of people face the prospect of losing their health care? Really Bill?

Collective Denial At Planetary Science: Vision 2050 Workshop, earlier post

Trump budget expected to seek historic contraction of federal workforce, Washington Post

"Preliminary budget documents have also shown that Trump advisers have also looked at cutting the Environmental Protection Agency's staff by about 20 percent and tightening the Commerce Department's budget by about 18 percent, which would impact climate change research and weather satellite programs, among other things. Trump and his advisers have said that they believe the federal workforce is too big, and that the federal government spends - and wastes - too much money. They have said that Washington - the federal workers and contractors, among others - has benefited from government largesse while many other Americans have suffered. Federal spending, they have argued, crowds the private sector and piles regulations and bureaucracy onto companies. Trump's chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, has said Trump will lead a "deconstruction of the administrative state." On Friday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Obama loyalists had "burrowed into government." Last month, Trump said the government would have to "do more with less."

Update on Budget Process - Update From Acting NASA Administrator Lightfoot

"Last week, the White House released budget guidance to NASA and other government agencies for Fiscal Year 2018. In a normal, non-transition year this guidance - typically called "The Passback" -- would have been received shortly after Thanksgiving. Timing of this budget effort is not unusual during a transition year, but it is also important to point out that discussions are still underway. We're not yet at a point during this deliberative process where we have enough firm details to discuss the budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2018. You may have already heard some of what we are able to share. The Administration is preparing a Fiscal Year 2018 budget that would increase base military spending by $54 billion, to be offset by $54 billion in funds reallocated from the overall pool of resources available for domestic discretionary programs. While the final numbers for the agency and its programs are going through this give and take process, we remain confident in the Administration support for NASA."

- Heads Up NASA People: A Storm Is Coming, earlier post
- Collective Denial At Planetary Science: Vision 2050 Workshop, earlier post
- NASA Budget News Is Not Good, earlier post

Trump plan for 40% cut could cause @EPA science office 'to implode,' official warns, Science Insider

"The Trump administration wants to cut spending by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) by more than 40% from roughly $510 million to $290 million, according to sources that have seen preliminary directives from the White House's Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The cuts target scientific work in fields including climate change, air and water quality, and chemical safety."

White House proposes steep budget cut to leading climate science agency, Washington Post

"The Trump administration is seeking to slash the budget of one of the government's premier climate science agencies by 17 percent, delivering steep cuts to research funding and satellite programs, according to a four-page budget memo obtained by The Washington Post. The proposed cuts to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration would also eliminate funding for a variety of smaller programs, including external research, coastal management, estuary reserves and "coastal resilience," which seeks to bolster the ability of coastal areas to withstand major storms and rising seas. NOAA is part of the Commerce Department, which would be hit by an overall 18 percent budget reduction from its current funding level. The Office of Management and Budget also asked the Commerce Department to provide information about how much it would cost to lay off employees, while saying those employees who do remain with the department should get a 1.9 percent pay increase in January 2018. It requested estimates for terminating leases and government "property disposal.... "

... The biggest single cut proposed by the passback document comes from NOAA's satellite division, known as the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service, which includes a key repository of climate and environmental information, the National Centers for Environmental Information. Researchers there were behind a study suggesting that there has been no recent slowdown in the rate of climate change -- research that drew the ire of Republicans in Congress.

Washington Post: Trump Proposing 17 Percent Cut to NOAA, Space Policy Online

"The Trump Administration is at the beginning of the process for formulating the FY2018 budget. A broad "budget blueprint" will be released very soon, but the detailed request is not expected for several weeks. The numbers in the four-page memo are subject to change before the request is submitted to Congress, and, in any case, the President's request is just that, a request. Under the Constitution, only Congress has the "power of the purse," deciding how much money the government will spend and on what."

National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)

"Here at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) we provide secure and timely access to global environmental data and information from satellites and other sources to promote and protect the Nation's security, environment, economy, and quality of life."

FY 2017 Budget Request Highlights

"The FY 2017 President's Budget Request for NESDIS is $2,303.7 million. This request funds operations of current satellites and maintains acquisition and launch schedules for NOAA's flagship satellite programs. The request also ensures reliable and accurate long - term weather, ocean and coastal, and geophysical data and information that are critical for businesses, academic institutions, and government agencies."

Federal workers grow increasingly nervous about Trump's proposed budget cuts, Washington Post

"To the president and his supporters who see a bloated bureaucracy with lots of duplication and rules that choke jobs, the budget cuts are a necessary first step to make government run more efficiently. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said this week that non-military spending will take the "largest-proposed reduction since the early years of the Reagan administration." To prepare for that possibility, agencies are preparing to shave 10 percent off their budgets, on average. And words like buyouts, furloughs and RIFs (or reduction in force) - government-speak for layoffs - are now being tossed around at the water cooler as civil servants face the possibility of massive downsizing. Some of these strategies were used when Ronald Reagan was president and others more recently to meet the goals of budget caps known as sequestration."

Keith's note: As you all know it is much harder to lay off government employees than contractor employes. Yet that now seems to be what is in the plans. But if NASA is faced with making substantial cuts in its expenses then you can be assured that contractor personnel will bear a large part of the pain. Contractor employees have far fewer protections than civil servants. Also, in the past when budgets have gotten tight NASA has delayed solicitations, delayed and decreased the number of awards, and the cut the value of awards. With huge cuts in its budget looming on the horizon, you can expect that NASA procurement practices will respond to these cuts with surprising speed.

At the NASA Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop this week I asked a panel a question noting that there were "some very depressed people up on the 9th floor working on the budget passback to OMB". I asked the panel "what sort of box outside of which they needed to be thinking they had yet to think outside of" when it came to dealing with these looming budget cuts. The panel dodged the question and paradoxically started to talk about doing more things rather than less. I reiterated the harsh reality that goes with a President who "thinks potholes are more important than planets". Alas, the panel continued along their merry way in denial with some throw away lines such as "clearly we need to be doing things cheaper".

A storm is coming folks. You cannot hide under your desks and try and to ride it out. Not this time. You need to be preparing contingency plans and be ready to try things that you have never tried before to accomplish the tasks you have been given to do. Otherwise those things will not get done.


Loading

 



Monthly Archives

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the Budget category from March 2017.

Budget: February 2017 is the previous archive.

Budget: April 2017 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.