Budget: March 2019 Archives

Today's Budget Hearing

NASA's Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2020
2:30pm
Witness: Jim Bridenstine
Subcommittees: Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies (116th Congress)
Live-stream can be found here: https://youtu.be/Bpkpd8gk1hc






FY 2020 Federal Government Budget (NASA starts on page 97)

"- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is responsible for leading an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system and bring new knowledge and opportunities back to Earth.

- The Budget takes steps to achieve lunar exploration goals sooner, improve sustainability of NASA's exploration campaign, and increase the use of commercial partnerships and other procurement models to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of NASA programs.

- The Budget includes $363 million to support commercial development of a large lunar lander that can initially carry cargo and later astronauts to the surface of the Moon.

- The Budget focuses funding for the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, a heavy-lift expendable launch vehicle, to ensure the rocket is operational in the early 2020s when it will be needed to carry astronauts to the vicinity of the Moon.

- The Budget requests $21 billion for NASA, a $283 million or 1.4-percent increase from the 2019 estimate."

Keith's note: NASA's enacted FY 2019 budget was $21.5 billion. The White House budget request for NASA's FY 2020 budget is $21.019 billion which actually means a 2.2% decrease in NASA's budget. But NASA (at the direction of the White House) wants you to think that this is an increase. Congress will be weighing in on this.

- FY 2020 Budget Summary Briefing (2 MB PDF)
- FY 2020 Budget Agency Fact Sheet (300 KB PDF)
- - FY 2020 Budget Mission Fact Sheet (510 KB PDF)
Video: NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine's Remarks on the FY 2020 Budget
- Earlier budget postings

NASA Agency Budget Fact sheet

"STEM Engagement - $0.0 - The Budget provides no funding for the Office of STEM Engagement, redirecting those funds to NASA's core mission of exploration. The Budget continues support for activities funded in other accounts, including the Science Activation program within Science, which delivers science content and expertise through cooperative agreements with more than 25 organizations."

- NASA Budget Briefing

"Proposes termination of funding for NASA's Office of STEM Engagement, including its portfolio of grants and cooperative agreements and redirects funds to NASA's core mission of exploration.
- NASA headquarters will continue to be accountable for strategic direction and coordination of the agency's STEM engagement efforts.
- Continues internships, fellowships, and student STEM engagement activities and learning opportunities funded by NASA mission directorates.
- SMD's Science Activation program will continue to focus on delivering SMD content to learners of all ages through cooperative agreement awards."

Keith's note: This is not going to happen. The Obama White House tried this - once - and that did not work out well for them. The current White House tried this twice in 2017 and Congress aid no each time and restored the budget. They will do it again this time. But this time, education is an issue that the Democratic House will fall on their swords for. Who knows - maybe they will increase it beyond last year's level.

It does ring rather hollow to hear NASA leadership talk about all of the inspiration stuff when they look the other way while an effort is made to gut the heart of how NASA inspires: education.


- NASA FY 2020 Budget Fact sheet
- Ivanka Trump Supports NASA Education While Her Father Seeks To Gut It, earlier post (2017)
- Cutting NASA Education In Order To Save It, earlier post (2017)
- Senators Reject Trump Push To Cut NASA Education, earlier post (2017)
- Trump's NASA Budget Guts Earth Science and Totally Eliminates Education earlier post (2017)
- Earlier Education posts

NASA Agency Budget Fact sheet

"The Budget proposes to terminate the WFIRST mission and instead focus on completing the delayed James Webb Space Telescope. The Budget also proposes to terminate two Earth science missions (PACE and CLARREO-Pathfinder)."

March 11 Events Highlight NASA's Moon to Mars Plans, FY 2020 Budget

"NASA invites media and social media to agency centers across the country Monday, March 11, to get an up-close look at America's work to return astronauts to the Moon and on to Mars, following the delivery of President Trump's fiscal year 2020 budget proposal to the U.S. Congress."

NASA could see a 5 percent budget cut next year, official says, Houston Chronicle

"President Donald Trump is expected to propose a 5 percent cut to NASA's budget next year, a decision that stands in stark contrast to the president's pushed to return humans to the moon for the first time since 1972. The proposed cuts -- part of sweeping cuts to non-defense discretionary spending in every agency -- was disclosed in an article published online Monday by Russ Vought, acting head of the Office of Management and Budget. "It's unfortunate that once again when everyone is getting excited about going back to the moon ... that the announcement is on the heels of cuts for NASA," said Keith Cowing, editor of NASA Watch, a website devoted to space news. "This is not the signal you would hope to see at an agency that is about to embark on a multi-decade program of returning to and exploring the moon. ... "Again, NASA is caught making all these plans with faith-based projections where budgets will be," Cowing said. "There's nothing wrong with being optimistic, but at the end of the day, you can't just click your heels three times and hope money falls out of the sky."

Keith's note: It is going to be interesting to see how NASA is affected by the 5% across the board cuts that the White House is planning to make. For NASA that could mean as much as half a billion dollars or so. While the Vice President has all but set up a second home at NASA, his enthusiasm for space exploration needs to be followed with the funding to make all of the promises actually happen. Add in the chronic problems with SLS (which always require more money to fix), the inability for NASA to get its ISS privatization/commercialization plans implemented (while CASIS fumbles everything); and the challenge of keeping enthusiasm going for a first (return) human landing still a decade away. And then there's the impending pivot in the House on Earth and climate science, and the funding equation NASA is confronted with is as challenging as it has ever been.


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This page is an archive of entries in the Budget category from March 2019.

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