Budget: December 2019 Archives

<Artemis Wins Only Lukewarm Support In Final NASA FY 2020 Appropriation, Space Policy Online

"The House and Senate Appropriations Committees released the final versions of all 12 FY2020 appropriations bills today and hope to get them passed by the end of the week. The Commerce-Justice-Science (CJS) bill that funds NASA is combined with three others -- Defense, Financial Services, and Homeland Security -- into H.R. 1158, the "national security minibus." It includes $22.629 billion for NASA, almost exactly the same as the $22.616 billion amended request, but with different priorities than the Trump Administration. Landing astronauts on the Moon by 2024 does not seem to be one of them. The bill rejects Trump Administration proposals to terminate or postpone a number of programs, and only partially funds the supplemental request for the Artemis Moon-by-2024 program. More than half the Artemis-related funding may not be obligated until NASA submits a multi-year plan explaining how it intends to execute that program and development of human lunar landers received far less than requested."

Commentary: Beyond the decadal surveys: Establishing policy for US space science, Physics Today

"A surprisingly small number of individuals at the OMB are involved in space science: the director of the OMB and the associate director for natural resource programs, both of whom are political appointees; the deputy associate director for the energy, science, and water division; and the fewer than 10 individuals who make up the division's science and space branch. Space science is, for the most part, handled by just a few career civil servants. I've not come across anyone in Congress or the executive branch who simply did not want to fund space-science missions. I have, however, encountered government officials who are vividly frustrated with cost overruns, and I have found that bureaucrats tend to value flexibility. The folks I met at the OMB and on Capitol Hill were sensitive to unforeseen occurrences or prescriptive options that placed undue limits on future actions, particularly if they interfered with agreed-on courses of action or involved a time frame beyond which policies--or politicians--might experience turnover."


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This page is an archive of entries in the Budget category from December 2019.

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