SLS and Orion: June 2017 Archives

RSC BUDGET OPTIONS 2005 Summary and Explanation of Offsets, Rep. Mike Pence, RSC Chairman Rep. Jeb Hensarling, RSC Budget & Spending Task Force Chairman

[Page 6] "Cancel NASA's New Moon/Mars Initiative 2006: -1,493 5-year savings -11,511 10-year savings -44,042"

[Page 8] "Cancel NASA's New Moon/Mars Initiative In 2004, the President announced a new initiative to explore the Moon and Mars with the goal of returning humans to the Moon by 2020. NASA currently intends to use the savings from phasing out the space shuttle in 2012 to fund this program. Savings: $44 billion over ten years ($11.5 billion over five years)"

Early Retirement for Space Shuttles Unlikely, Lawmakers Say, Space.com (2005)

"A group of Republican lawmakers led by Mike Pence of Indiana last week said the $104 billion to replace the shuttles with a new spaceship and rockets to carry astronauts back to the moon ought to be canceled to help pay to rebuild the hurricane-wrecked Gulf Coast. Key Congressional leaders said there is little political support for either suggestion."

Could NASA and SpaceX cooperation turn into competition?

"... So, it came as a surprise to NASA when SpaceX founder Elon Musk held a conference call in February announcing plans to use a powerful rocket that hasn't yet flown to sling private tourists around the moon next year--an ambitious timeline, according to Mary Lynne Dittmar who represents some of SpaceX's competitors through the Coalition for Deep Space Exploration. "If you're putting all the schedule pressure on, you are essentially -- you're automatically assuming more risk. You're automatically creating an environment where you are operating at higher risk because you have to meet the deadline," Dittmar explained. Dittmar said she is concerned about the 2018 deadline for SpaceX."

Keith's note: Meanwhile Mary Lynne Dittmar's favorite rocket - the one she's paid to promote (SLS) is years behind schedule, over budget, and fraught with ongoing software and manufacturing errors. SpaceX launches (and lands) rockets on a regular basis. Falcon Heavy is composed three of these rockets strapped together and will launch soon. SLS will not launch until 2020 (maybe) and then not again for 2-4 years. Infrequent launches are one easy way to generate a lot of programmatic risk. So ... who has more in-house, currently functional operational experience under their belt, Mary Lynne? Certainly not the SLS folks.




Keith's note: Sources report that NASA MSFC has concluded that accelerating hardware originally intended for EM-2 such that it could be used on EM-1 would not be ready in time. So they have decided to try and flight-certify qualification test articles for flight on EM-1 instead. The goal is to try and have an SLS vehicle ready to fly during Trump's first term in office. Since 2018 is off the table that means 2019 and perhaps 2020. The operative word is "try".

- NASA Decides Against Putting Crew On EM-1, earlier post
- SLS LOX Dome Dropped And Damaged Beyond Repair (Update), earlier post
- Newt Gingrich Thinks SLS May Become a Museum Piece - Soon, earlier post
- Earlier SLS news


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