Congress: January 2021 Archives

Four defense contractors among firms halting political donations after Capitol riots, The Hill

"Defense contractors Northrop Grumman, Leidos, BAE Systems and Raytheon are among a growing number of companies that announced a pause on political donations to members of Congress following violent riots at the U.S. Capitol last week. Northrop - which last year contributed $4.8 million roughly equally to Democrats and Republicans - on Monday became the first major defense firm to halt its donations."

Walmart halts political donations to lawmakers who voted against Biden win, Washington Post

"An analysis by the nonprofit Center for Responsive Politics found four defense firms among the top 20 contributors to the campaigns of Republicans who objected to Biden's win. Northrop Grumman was 10th among them with $687,500 donated to lawmakers who objected to the election. ... The defense industry has in many ways walked in lockstep with Trump since he took office. The industry has benefited significantly from increased military spending under Trump, as well as the president's support for international arms sales. Lockheed Martin became a centerpiece of a White House-sponsored advertising campaign highlighting the administration's job creation credentials. When Trump blamed "both sides" for violence at a Charlottesville white supremacist rally in 2017, defense firms were among the few companies that supported the president's business councils. Other corporations left the councils in protest, leading to their dissolution."

- Sierra Nevada Prefers Republicans Over Democrats, earlier post
- Lopsided Political Support By Big Aerospace, earlier post
- How Big Aerospace Supported Efforts To Undermine Democracy, earlier post

There's A New "Make Space Great Again" Campaign Video From Team Trump, Earlier post

"At 4:10 the live chat begins. It is hosted by Donald Trump Jr.'s girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle who works on the Trump campaign. Her guests are former NASA Chief Financial Officer Jeff DeWit and former astronaut and NASA GRC Center Director Janet Kavandi who is now a Senior Vice President at Sierra Nevada Corp. Apparently the Trump family is really into space - Eric Trump's brother-in-law Kyle Yunaska is the new Deputy Chief of Staff at NASA."

Keith's note: Some research from a noted space policy expert: Open Secrets has a lot of data that lets you do a deep dive into who gave what to whom. Check out this chart (larger image). Looking at Big Aerospace - specifically the top 12 NASA contractors and their PAC contributions by party during the recent election cycle - all but SpaceX and Bechtel favor the congressional republicans. Republican-leaning donors are shown in red, Democrat-leaning contributors are shown in blue.

Traditionally PACs focus on incumbents, which makes these numbers even more skewed. Every contractor gave significantly to Sen. Cruz (R-TX) and virtually ignored Sen. Sinema (D-AZ) for example. Oh yes, Sen. Sinema is about to become the Chair of the prime Senate space subcommittee (subcommittee on Aviation and Space, Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation). Big Aerospace gave candidate (and now Senator) Mark Kelly (D-AZ) next to nothing yet many aerospace contributors maxed out when donating to his opponent, incumbent Sen. McSally (R-AZ).

With such a lopsided approach to contributions toward their opponents why should Democrats feel a need to advance the Big Aerospace agenda? Out of ~$12 million in contributions, over $1 million more was given to Republicans than Democrats. Boeing, SAIC and Aerojet Rocketdyne gave 60% (or more) to Republicans. Aerojet Rocketdyne gave 73% more. Other than ULA, only company PAC contributions are included in chis chart - not contributions from employees. ULA doesn't have a PAC, so employee contributions (73% Republican) were used.

How Big Aerospace Supported Efforts To Undermine Democracy, earlier post


Loading

 



Monthly Archives

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the Congress category from January 2021.

Congress: December 2020 is the previous archive.

Congress: February 2021 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.