Earth Science: September 2015 Archives

NASA/USAID SERVIR - A Partnership Connecting Space to Village

"NASA and USAID have accomplished a lot together. Launch of this important new hub in the SERVIR network, which includes SERVIR-Himalaya, SERVIR-Eastern and Southern Africa and the Applied Sciences Team projects in Mesoamerica, is certainly tangible proof that what we're doing is working. We get a lot of questions about our Earth observation work at NASA. In fact, a lot of people aren't even aware that it's such a core function of the agency. But make no mistake, NASA is deeply committed to Earth science and the value it provides people around the globe. We have been since our founding."

SMAP Radar Fails But Mission Continues

"Mission managers for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory have determined that its radar, one of the satellite's two science instruments, can no longer return data. ... The SMAP spacecraft continues normal operations and the first data release of soil moisture products is expected in late September. "Although some of the planned applications of SMAP data will be impacted by the loss of the radar, the SMAP mission will continue to produce valuable science for important Earth system studies," said Dara Entekhabi, SMAP Science Team lead at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. On July 7, SMAP's radar stopped transmitting due to an anomaly involving the radar's high-power amplifier (HPA)."

Keith's note: Wow. JPL is sure spinning this bad news on this $915 million mission. That's almost a billion dollars. The radar was at the core of SMAP's mission i.e. "one of the satellite's two science instruments". It failed. Sure, other stuff still works but that radar broke after only a few months. But JPL PAO wants you to think that "The SMAP spacecraft continues normal operations." So, I guess radar failure is considered "normal"?


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This page is an archive of entries in the Earth Science category from September 2015.

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