Earth Science: September 2017 Archives

Facts Contradict House Science Committee Majority's Attack on NOAA's Climate Scientists

"On Sunday, the British tabloid The Mail on Sunday, was forced to publish an "adverse adjudication" against it by the Independent Press Standards Organization (IPSO), the independent regulator of the British newspaper and magazine industry, regarding a climate change story it published on February 5, 2017, by controversial reporter David Rose. The article, with the original online headline: Exposed: How world leaders were duped into investing billions over manipulated global warming data, was largely based on an interview with Dr. John Bates, a former National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientist about his criticism of a NOAA climate study. In its published findings, the IPSO concluded that the article was both inaccurate and misleading. ... Science Committee Republicans had seized on the misleading The Mail on Sunday article and published their own press release the same day the article appeared on February 5, 2017 with a headline that also twisted the comments by Dr. Bates, incorrectly asserting that Dr. Bates had said NOAA colleagues "manipulated climate records.""

Former NOAA Scientist Confirms Colleagues Manipulated Climate Records, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology (Feb 2017)

"U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology members today responded to reports about the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) 2015 climate change study ("the Karl study"). According to Dr. John Bates, the recently retired principal scientist at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, the Karl study was used "to discredit the notion of a global warming hiatus and rush to time the publication of the paper to influence national and international deliberations on climate policy."

KSC Prepares For Irma

Hurricane Irma's approach hasn't deterred SpaceX, Orlando Sentinel

"Hurricane Irma's approach toward Florida hasn't deterred SpaceX's plan to launch a rocket Thursday. The Elon Musk-led space company announced Wednesday that a 5-hour, 5-minute window will open at 9:50 a.m. Thursday. U.S. Air Force officials have said that the chances of a launch sit about 50 percent. SpaceX will try to land the rocket on a landing zone, a move expected to result in a sonic boom that will be heard across Central Florida. If the Falcon 9 rocket does not go up, a second window will open at an undetermined time Friday."

Still repairing from Matthew, Kennedy Space Center preps for Hurricane Irma, Click Orlando

"On Wednesday, Kennedy Space Center enacted a HURCON IV declaration by the Emergency Operation Center, meaning center managers are preparing facilities and their employees for 58 mph winds within 72 hours. ... Under a HURCON declaration all normal operations stop to prepare for the storm, according to NASA."

- Video Of Space Station Orbital Pass Over Hurricane Irma
- Hurricane Irma Seen From Orbit By Eumetsat
- Suomi NPP Observes Barbuda As Hurricane Irma Attacked

EPA now requires political aide's sign-off for agency awards, grant applications, Washington Post

"The Environmental Protection Agency has taken the unusual step of putting a political operative in charge of vetting the hundreds of millions of dollars in grants the EPA distributes annually, assigning final funding decisions to a former Trump campaign aide with little environmental policy experience. In this role, John Konkus reviews every award the agency gives out, along with every grant solicitation before it is issued. According to both career and political employees, Konkus has told staff that he is on the lookout for "the double C-word" -- climate change -- and repeatedly has instructed grant officers to eliminate references to the subject in solicitations."

"BRIDENSTINE: Mr. Speaker, global temperatures stopped rising 10 years ago. Global temperature changes, when they exist, correlate with Sun output and ocean cycles. During the Medieval Warm Period from 800 to 1300 A.D. --long before cars, power plants, or the Industrial Revolution--temperatures were warmer than today. During the Little Ice Age from 1300 to 1900 A.D., temperatures were cooler. Neither of these periods were caused by any human activity. Even climate change alarmists admit that the number of hurricanes hitting the U.S. and the number of tornado touchdowns have been on a slow decline for over 100 years. But here's what we absolutely know. We know that Oklahoma will have tornadoes when the cold jet stream meets the warm gulf air. And we also know that this President spends 30 times as much money on global warming research as he does on weather forecasting and warning. For this gross misallocation, the people of Oklahoma are ready to accept the President's apology, and I intend to submit legislation to fix this."

How Jonathan Dimock Auditioned To Be NASA White House Liaison, earlier post

"All of that to say, in science, we know nothing. We can only do the best we can with what we know and if we are so hard pressed on believing that the earth is warming because of my Buick, then we can find evidence to prove that theory correct. But we can also find evidence that the earth has gone through cycles on hot and cold and gee.....that means that our carbon dating and light speeds change too. This is the same with all types of science. We can prove that oil fracking can rejuvenate the crust and make the surface flourish if we look for that evidence instead of pointing fingers at the oil companies. But of course this all comes down to what makes sensational news or if you are taking a position of defending your business model or political policies."

- Trump Eliminates National Climate Assessment Panel, earlier post
- Will Saying "Climate Change" Be Banned At All Government Agencies Or Just Some Of Them?, earlier post



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