Earth Science: November 2018 Archives

Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States, U.S. Global Chance Research Program

"In the absence of significant global mitigation action and regional adaptation efforts, rising temperatures, sea level rise, and changes in extreme events are expected to increasingly disrupt and damage critical infrastructure and property, labor productivity, and the vitality of our communities. Regional economies and industries that depend on natural resources and favorable climate conditions, such as agriculture, tourism, and fisheries, are vulnerable to the growing impacts of climate change. Rising temperatures are projected to reduce the efficiency of power generation while increasing energy demands, resulting in higher electricity costs. The impacts of climate change beyond our borders are expected to increasingly affect our trade and economy, including import and export prices and U.S. businesses with overseas operations and supply chains. Some aspects of our economy may see slight near-term improvements in a modestly warmer world. However, the continued warming that is projected to occur without substantial and sustained reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy throughout this century, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts. With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic sectors are projected to reach hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century--more than the current gross domestic product (GDP) of many U.S. states."

Ranking Member Johnson Statement on Vol. II of the Fourth National Climate Assessment Report

"This report provides the most comprehensive look at the effects of climate change on the United States ever, and the results, as we've sadly grown accustomed to, are quite terrifying - increased wildfires, more damaging storms, dramatic sea level rise, more harmful algal blooms, disease spread, dire economic impacts, the list goes on and on. That being said, all hope is not lost, but we must act now. We have to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, work on adaptation and mitigation, and explore technology solutions such as geoengineering and carbon capture and sequestration. That is why I have made climate change one of my top priorities for the Committee going in to the next Congress."

Keith's note: Although NASA participated in this study and provided much of the underlying data for its observations and recommendations, NASA.gov has not posted any commentary or reference to this report. To be fair, the report was released on the day after Thanksgiving when a large number of people were not paying any attention to the news due to the fact that they took the day off. Sometimes releasing a controversial report on a day like this is a good way to bury things that will be controversial. Other times it is the best way to sneak a report out before it can be held back. Usually it is a bit of both.


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