Education: January 2013 Archives

Challenger +27

Challenger Center Marks 27th Anniversary of Space Shuttle Tragedy

"On Monday January 28, Challenger Center for Space Science Education (Challenger Center) will recognize the anniversary of the Challenger tragedy as it continues its work to strengthen students' interest and knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). The non-profit organization was formed as a living tribute to the seven members of the crew and is dedicated to the educational spirit of their mission. Challenger Center and its network of Challenger Learning Centers will recognize the anniversary in a variety of ways, including launching rockets, writing letters about how the crew provided inspiration, and designing commemorative anniversary badges. The Challenger Center staff will visit the memorial at Arlington National Cemetery."

Lecture: Caution and Boldness: Balancing Risk in Spaceflight

"This program will commemorate and reflect on the challenges of human spaceflight, and consider possibilities for the future with the International Space Station and travel to other bodies in the solar system."

Keith Cowing's Devon Island Journal - 18 July 2007: Ancient Memorials for Modern Space Explorers (pictures and video)

"In addition to doing our webcasts, the other main task we had was the building of a memorial inukshuk to the crew of Space Shuttle Challenger. An inukshuk is stone structure built by the Inuit to mark a specific location - for a variety of reasons. Some times they are marking a navigation point. Other times, a good place for hunting. Some times it is a doorway through which a shaman would pass as part of a religious ritual. Other times, who knows - they thought the place was worth marking."

Keith's note: On a sad note, a number of us who have worked and travelled in the arctic and antarctic are familiar with Kenn Borek Twin Otter planes and their amazing crews. As such, it was very sad to learn that the specific plane that crashed last week in Antarctica was one that I and many others had flown on more than once.

NASA NSPIRES: The Next Generation Plenary: Next Destinations for Human Space Exploration

"Calling U.S. students and U.S. young professionals! If you could choose humanity's next destination in space, where would you choose? We want to hear what you think should be the next destination for humans to explore and why your destination is the best. As today's 21- to 35-year-olds, you will be the senior engineers and mission managers who will be carrying out and leading the next human missions to explore space, and we want your input. Why wait 10 years to be heard?! We invite you to share your ideas with space leaders in government, industry and academia at the International Astronautical Congress in Beijing, China, 23-27 September 2013!"

NASA's Call for Abstracts for the 64th International Astronautical Congress (IAC)

Keith's note: I think it is great that NASA seeks the input of the next generation of space explorers. But its somewhat odd that NASA is asking people what "humanity's next destination in space" should be when (depending who you listen to) the agency has already been given that destination. Is this request seeking the next destination after asteroids/Mars - or is this one instead of asteroids/Mars? Given that NASA Administrator Bolden does/does not want to go to an asteroid - or may want to bring that asteroid back to Earth - or maybe also wants to go to L2 and/or Mars, I guess yet another destination exercise won't really make things that much more confused.

Charlie Bolden's Meandering Strategic Plans, earlier post



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This page is an archive of entries in the Education category from January 2013.

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