Election 2008: February 2008 Archives

Barack Obama: One-on-one with WKYC's Tom Beres, WKYC.com (half way through video)

Obama: "I've got a strong belief in NASA and the process of space exploration. I do think that our program has been stuck for a while - that the space shuttle mission did not inspire the imagination of the public - that much of the experimentation that was done could have been conducted not necessarily with manned flights. I think that broadening our horizons - and looking at a combination of both unmanned satellites of the sort that we saw with the Jupiter launch - but also looking at where we can start planning for potential manned flights. I think that is something that I'm excited about and could be part of a broader strategy for science and technology investment ... The only thing I want to say is that I want to do a thorough review because some of these programs may not be moving in the right direction and I want to make sure that NASA spending is a little more coherent than it has been over the last several years.

Former President Clinton stumps for Hillary in Houston, Houston Chronicle

"Clinton pointed out that Hillary Clinton places more of an emphasis than Obama on human space travel. "This is the center of American space travel," he said of Houston and the Johnson Space Center. "Sixteen thousand (local) jobs -- and a lot of America's future -- rely on this."

Bill Clinton Says Hillary Will Change Lives If Elected President, Fox 26

"He also emphasized her commitment to manned spaceflight. About 100,000 people in the Houston area work for NASA's Johnson Space Center or related industries."

Bill: Hillary Hearts Outer Space, National Journal Hotline

em>"Hillary has always supported the manned space program just as I did when I was president," he told a crowd of over 250 who gathered in a picturesque neighborhood park in a Houston suburb today. "Her opponent says we should downgrade man space travel and upgrade robotic travel."

Clinton, Obama Surrogates Debate Science Policy, CQ Politics

"It wasn't in primetime. In fact, it wasn't broadcast at all. The audience wasn't hand-picked to equally represent the candidates. But a weekend debate at the American Association for the Advancement of Science between science advisors to the Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama campaigns was strikingly similar to forums between the candidates."

Scientists urged to plan for the next US president, Nature (subscription)

"Alec Ross, a technology entrepreneur and adviser to Obama, focused on his candidate's plans to expand broadband and technology infrastructure to all Americans. He also hinted that within weeks Obama would unveil a new plan for NASA and space exploration."

Hillary Clinton campaigns in Houston, AP

"Clinton took the stage at about 9:40 p.m. and spoke for about 30 minutes. She touched on usual campaign themes, including affordable health care for all Americans and bringing home the troops from Iraq. She also hit on a local note, pledging to keep funding NASA. "I believe we need to keep funding our next generation of spacecraft," she said."

Clinton, Obama address Houston hot topics, Houston Chronicle

"Obama agreed that NASA, which employs thousands of Houston-area voters who work at or with the Johnson Space Center, should be a tool for inspiring the nation. But, he said, the next president needs to have "a practical sense of what investments deliver the most scientific and technological spinoffs -- and not just assume that human space exploration, actually sending bodies into space, is always the best investment."

Election 2008 Update

Clinton, Obama address Houston hot topics, Houston Chronicle

"I intend to pursue an ambitious agenda in both space exploration and earth sciences," Clinton said. "I want to support the next generation of spacecraft for a robust human spaceflight program." Obama agreed that NASA, which employs thousands of Houston-area voters who work at or with the Johnson Space Center, should be a tool for inspiring the nation. But, he said, the next president needs to have "a practical sense of what investments deliver the most scientific and technological spinoffs -- and not just assume that human space exploration, actually sending bodies into space, is always the best investment."

John Glenn Endorses Clinton, AP

"In 1962, Glenn, a Marine pilot, was the first American to orbit the Earth, becoming an instant national hero. In 1998, shortly before retiring from Senate after 24 years, he became the world's oldest astronaut, returning to space aboard the Shuttle Discovery at age 77. Glenn briefly sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 1984. "I am deeply honored to have the support of Senator Glenn, a true American hero," Clinton said. "With his help, we'll bring our message of change across Ohio."

Election 2008 Update

I Told Hillary to "Send Astronauts to Mars", Political Action for Space

"Last night, Michael Laine and I went to see Hillary campaign along the Seattle waterfront in a cruise line terminal. I squeezed underneath some bleachers to get to the VIP area and wiggled my way right up next to the disabled people and seniors. Then, when she was in the middle of her speech, I shouted: "Send Astronauts to Mars!" using a Hillary sign as a megaphone. She faltered, and continued talking about technology and innovation."

Editor's note: Well, there were no space questions asked in the Republican debate. But you can still vote for questions to be asked of the Democratic candidates on Thursday evening here. As it happened, no space-related questions were offered for final vote to be asked of Sen. Clinton. However, two space-related questions were among the finalists offered for voting for Sen. Obama.

Editor's update: Well, there were no space questions asked in the Democratic debate either. Was it worth your collective effort? Two space questions did make it to the top of the heap such that people could vote on them tonight. That is certainly a first - and there was the preponderance of space questions that managed to hold onto top positions for weeks on Politico.com - also unprecedented.

But to me, the most important thing was a demonstration - by all of those people who submitted and voted for space-related questions - that space exploration advocates could exert this common surge of effort and help raise the issue of space exploration in a way that has not been seen in the past. Neither party has picked a nominee. And there is still a general election after they do. The opportunities to exert similar - and perhaps greater influence will continue.

You did it once, you can do it again.

What's The Point?, Political Action For Space

"I'm proud of what has happened, and I feel encouraged that sustaining our efforts throughout this election and beyond will bear greater fruits. I pledge to you all that I will continue my efforts running actionforspace.com to make it easier for you to have an impact on the future of the space exploration. I look forward to the continued help and participation for you all. Thanks for your incredible response for the debates in Los Angeles."

Comments? Send them to nasawatch@reston.com. Your comments so far:


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This page is an archive of entries in the Election 2008 category from February 2008.

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