Exploration: April 2011 Archives

H.R.1641 -- REAL Space Act (Introduced in House - IH), introduced by Rep. Posey

"In accordance with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2005, which established as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's priority goal: `To develop a sustained human presence on the Moon . . . to promote exploration, commerce, science, and United States preeminence in space as a stepping stone for the future exploration of Mars and other destinations.', and in accordance with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 2008, which endorsed `the broad goals of the space exploration policy of the United States, including the eventual return to and exploration of the Moon and other destinations in the solar system and the important national imperative of independent access to space', the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall plan to return to the Moon by 2022 and develop a sustained human presence on the Moon, in order to promote exploration, commerce, science, and United States preeminence in space as a stepping stone for the future exploration of Mars and other destinations. The budget requests and expenditures of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall be consistent with achieving this goal."

Cislunar Space Rationale

A Rationale for Cislunar Space

"At a recent workshop on lunar return, a critical part of the discussion focused on the need for a statement of purpose - a value proposition for the Moon. Over the years I've attempted to distill my rationale for lunar return (my "elevator speech" if you will) into a clearly stated and persuasive argument about the need for enabling human reach beyond low Earth orbit - into all the areas between Earth and Moon (cislunar space) where all of our satellite assets reside. So, as the elevator doors are closing, I will state my Rationale for Cislunar Space:"

Project Morpheus To Begin Testing at NASA's Johnson Space Center

"Neighbors of NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston may notice some loud noises coming from the 1,600-acre site in the coming weeks. Johnson's Engineering Directorate is ready to begin testing its prototype lander as part of - Project Morpheus - a vertical test bed designed to integrate technologies that could be used to build future spacecraft intended to land on the moon, Mars, asteroids or any other foreign surface."

Keith's note: I am baffled. JSC is doing cool stuff like this - but in this press release they offer no pictures of the lander, the test site, not even a website for it? No streaming video is offered, nothing on YouTube? Why do you hide cool things, JSC? FAIL.

Keith's 2:15 pm EDT update: According to a NASA Watch reader, here are NASA JSC's Stealth Social Media sites (awaiting some sort of approval): Twitter.com/morpheuslander, Flickr.com/morpheuslander, Youtube.com/morpheuslander, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Project-Morpheus/156555054405321?ref=sgm. Their Facebook page also lists http://morpheus.jsc.nasa.gov and another Project Morpheus page as well.

Keith's 3:05 pm EDT update: When I first posted these links, with the exception of the Facebook page, they were devoid of content. Suddenly things are being posted. Too bad JSC PAO needs to be kicked in the butt to do this stuff - stuff they should just do naturally as a standard part of their job.

Renewal of a Life and Physical Sciences Research Program at NASA Could Facilitate Longer, Farther Human Space Missions

"By elevating its life and physical sciences research program, NASA could achieve the biological understanding and technical breakthroughs needed to allow humans to be sent deeper into space, including to Mars, says a new National Research Council report. In addition, access to the space environment -- for example, on the International Space Station -- will open up further opportunities for groundbreaking research in the physical and life sciences. The report, one of a series of decadal surveys that the Research Council has completed for NASA and the first on interdisciplinary life and physical sciences for exploration missions, lays out a research agenda for the next decade that could bring about developments with substantial payoffs for human exploration of space."


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