ISS News: October 2009 Archives

C3PO at NASA

Recovery.gov: NASA Solicitation: Commercial Crew and Cargo Program Office Support

"JSC intends to issue modification 166, funding Task Order 2.1.8. The purpose of this task order is to develop a set of human system integration requirements for application to commercial spacecraft in support of NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo Program (C3PO). The human system integration requirements developed under this task order shall be based on a review of existing Human Rating requirements, Spaceflight Human Systems Standards, Constellation Program requirements, Commercial Crew and Cargo Program Office operational concepts and requirements, and the Johnson Space Center Space Life Sciences Directorate Human Interface Design Handbook."

Commercial Spaceflight: All Systems Go, Wall Street Journal (by Buzz Aldrin, Ken Bowersox, Jake Garn, Robert Gibson, Hank Hartsfield, John Herrington, Byron Lichtenberg, John Lounge, Rick Searfoss, Norman Thagard, Kathryn Thornton, Jim Voss and Charles Walker)

"... we firmly support the findings of the Augustine Committee, a presidential blue ribbon panel that has endorsed commercial human spaceflight. Sally Ride, one of America's most well-known astronauts and a member of the committee, put it best when she said, "We would like to be able to get NASA out of the business of getting people to low Earth orbit. We wholeheartedly agree. NASA should put its unique resources into pushing back the final frontier and not in repaving the earth-to-orbit road it cleared a half century ago."

An Open Letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden From Robert Bigelow, earlier post

An Open Letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Robert Bigelow, Space News

"Both large, experienced companies like Boeing, and new entrepreneurial firms like Bigelow Aerospace and SpaceX, believe in the value of commercial crew. The Atlas 5 has already proven itself more than capable of delivering high-value cargo, and, if a commercial crew program is initiated, the Atlas will readily prove itself capable of delivering crew to LEO. Herein lies the answer to your human spaceflight dilemma. A commercial crew program can easily return Americans to space in a mere four years for the amount of funding recommended by the Augustine Committee."

Keith's note: When I originally posted a link to this article last night I was able to access and read it even though I do not subscribe to Space News. Now Space News/Space.com has decided to shut off free access and only make it available to paid subscribers. As such, I have posted the letter here, courtesy of Bob Bigelow: "An Open Letter to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden From Robert Bigelow"

"International Space Station Expedition 20 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Michael Barratt landed their Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft on the steppes of Kazakhstan Sunday, wrapping up a six-month stay. Joining them was spaceflight participant Guy Laliberte, who spent 11 days in space. Padalka, the Soyuz commander, guided the spacecraft to a parachute-assisted landing at 12:32 a.m. EDT at a site northeast of the town of Arkalyk." Larger image

SpaceX hopes to launch first manned commercial rocket, Orlando Sentinel

"Asked what bugs them most about NASA outsourcing the job of flying crew to the International Space Station, some astronauts roll their eyes and say: "Dragon." That's the name of the capsule being built by SpaceX, the aerospace startup founded by Internet tycoon Elon Musk, a capsule designed to be fully automated. But with no controls to "fly" their ride, astronauts fear they'll be "Spam in a can" -- little more than human cargo. And if they don't pilot a ship, they worry, how can they keep the fleet of T-38 jets that are the symbol of the astronaut corps?"

Soyuz Landing Caps Historic Space Station Increment

"International Space Station Expedition 20 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Michael Barratt landed their Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft on the steppes of Kazakhstan Sunday, wrapping up a six-month stay. Joining them was spaceflight participant Guy Laliberte, who spent 11 days in space. Padalka and Barratt spent 199 days in space and 197 days on the station after their March 26 launch. Laliberte launched with the Expedition 21 crew on a Soyuz vehicle Sept. 30 and returned after nine days on the station."

Poetic Social Mission Complete, Lalibert Returns to Earth, SpaceRef Canada (With video)

"Lalibert will hold a press conference on Tuesday to discuss his mission which was highlighted by his Poetic Social Mission, an event that spanned the globe during a two hour broadcast on Friday, October 9th."

Cirque founder arrives at space station, Globe and Mail

"Unlike his space-tourist predecessors, however, he is not a "geek," said Keith Cowing, editor at NASA Watch web site. "He's the first person whose sole claim to being there is that he's a performance artist," Mr. Cowing said. "He was amazingly successful at it, and that's what gave him the resources to get there." Though deep pockets are a prerequisite, it also requires determination and rigorous training, he added. "It's not like he decided to go on a cruise. You've got to have this tenacity to go."

Expedition 21 Crew Arrives at the International Space Station

"Flight Engineers Jeff Williams and Maxim Suraev along with spaceflight participant Guy Lalibert have arrived at the International Space Station. They docked their Soyuz TMA-16 to the aft end of the Zvezda service module at 4:35 a.m. EDT Friday. They launched Wednesday at 3:14 a.m. from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. The newest station crew members entered the station after opening the hatches between the two spacecraft at 6:57 a.m."


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This page is an archive of entries in the ISS News category from October 2009.

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