ISS News: February 2015 Archives

Russia Will Spin-Off ISS Parts for New Space Station, Discovery News

"The Russian space agency Roscosmos says it will support U.S. plans to keep the International Space Station (ISS) operating through 2024, but then wants to split off three still-to-be launched modules to form a new, independent orbital outpost. The announcement this week by a senior planning board reverses previous statements by Russian officials that Russia would end involvement in the 15-nation program in 2020 when current agreements expire. Despite occasional rhetoric, the Russian-U.S. space marriage has been largely left out of growing economic and political tensions stemming from Russia's invasion of Ukraine's Crimea peninsula last year."

Keith's note: This is not a bad thing. And I am not talking about no longer having to deal with Russia since we'll certainly find a way to find ourselves in a political spat with someone else on Earth after they leave the ISS. Rather, it shows how assets in space can be repurposed, refurbished -- re-imagined. Instead of throwing things away in orbit (Skylab, Salyuts, Mir) we can now build upon these assets and move them around like Lego bricks to form new things as we need them - and then do this again and again. When the government is done with their hardware, it can be used by someone else - just like old military bases can become movie studios and shopping malls. The more orbital capacity that is available, the more customers it can collectively and individually serve. The more valuable these on-orbit assets become for government and non-government uses, the more everyone will want to safeguard that growing capacity (and isolate it from terrestrial squabbles) as has been the case with ISS recently.

Updated Dates Announced for Space Station U.S. Spacewalks, NASA

"Space station managers decided Thursday to move the first two spacewalks by NASA's Expedition 42 Commander Barry "Butch" Wilmore and Flight Engineer Terry Virts by one day because of added analysis of spacesuits they will wear."

NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 19 February 2015, SpaceRef

"Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparation: The USOS crew members performed final preparations for the upcoming EVAs. Today, they reviewed the detailed EVA timeline, briefing package, and crib sheet then completed final tool configuration."

NASA ISS On-Orbit Status 4 February 2015, SpaceRef

"Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV)-5 Status: Yesterday, ATV experienced a failure with Battery Power Chain #4. ATV ground teams have confirmed the failure is real and not a sensor issue. The ground teams have taken the necessary precautions and are continuing their investigation. The vehicle has a total of four power chains. Should a second power chain failure occur, an expedited undocking would be required within 24 hours per ATV Flight Rules. Break Up Camera (BUC) and Reentry Breakup Recorder (REBR) are currently scheduled to be installed inside ATV next week with a nominal undocking occurring on Saturday, February 14th."

Marc's note: This is not a significant issue at this time from the limited information available. Perhaps the 11:00 am. scheduled Space Station Live update will provide an update.

Marc's update: During today's Space Station Live the issue was mentioned with no new information. At this point everything is on track for the Saturday, February 14th undocking.

NASA's Physical Science Informatics Database Now Open to the Public, NASA

"At NASA, we are excited to announce the roll-out of the Physical Science Informatics (PSI) data repository for physical science experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS). The PSI system is now accessible and open to the public. This will be a resource for researchers to data mine the PSI system and expand upon the valuable research performed on the ISS using it as a research tool to further science, while also fulfilling the President's Open Data Policy. Since 2001, microgravity experiments have been conducted on ISS in the physical sciences and have yielded rich results, some unexpected and most would not be observed in Earth-based labs. These results provided valuable insights into fundamental physical behavior that can apply to both terrestrial and space environments. Collecting this data in a single location not only provides scientists with scientific data from hundreds of NASA experiments, it also helps identify fields where more study is needed."

- No Mention at CASIS (no surprise since they ignore the weekly NASA-developed Spaceline update (latest update)
- No Mention at NASA Space Station Homepage (also no surprise since they ignore Spaceline)
- No Mention at International Space Station National Laboratory (no surprise since they also ignore Spaceline)

Then there's this research announced yesterday by FASEB "How Spaceflight Ages the Immune System Prematurely". Do NASA or CASIS mention this paper? No. Oddly NASA and CASIS like to jump up and down and tell you about all of the amazing research they want to do on the ISS to solve all of humanity's problems. Spaceline will mention this paper in their weekly summary - but NASA and CASIS ignore Spaceline. In yesterday's budget briefing NASA mentioned how they want to ramp up ISS utilization in the coming years. Of course this is a good idea since the potential of this amazing facility has yet to be tapped. Alas, given the way that NASA and CASIS handle the dissemination of research results this will simply mean that more important and interesting research will be ignored.



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About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the ISS News category from February 2015.

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