IT/Web: December 2011 Archives

NASA OIG: NASA's Real Property Master Planning Efforts

"NASA's development of the Agency's first integrated master plan is a positive step toward better managing its diverse real property assets. However, we found deficiencies within the individual Center master plans the Agency is using to develop the integrated Agency plan that may limit the Plan's usefulness for making strategic real property decisions. Specifically, we found that NASA is developing its initial master plan based on Center master plans that (1) were developed using funding assumptions for the recapitalization program that are no longer realistic and (2) are missing essential information needed to make objective Agency-wide real property decisions. In addition, 5 of the 10 Centers did not develop master plans to reduce their real property footprint in accordance with Agency goals because of uncertain mission requirements."

Keith's note: According to State of the Federal Web Report, issued 16 Dec 2011 by the .gov Reform Task Force

"Some agencies, such as NASA, have a relatively small number of domains compared to other agencies, yet NASA reported the highest number of public websites, with 1,590."

NASA is quoted in this document as saying:

True number of systems unknown: Several agencies admitted that it was not clear how many CMS [Content Management System] are in use: "This number is a guess. No one at NASA knows the number with certainty."

"There is no uniform agency-wide process for ensuring content on the other NASA sites is accessible, updated, accurate or routinely improved. Individual programs and projects at the Centers and offices at NASA Headquarters manage their own content and are responsible for accuracy and accessibility."

"There is no agency-wide process for reporting the results of these center processes or establishing any of them as best practices."

Dawn Obtains First Low Altitude Images of Vesta

Keith's note: This press release says "More information about the Dawn mission is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/dawn and http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov." That's two separate websites at NASA for the same mission. But wait - there's yet another here. But you also reach this site if you go to http://www.nasa.gov/dawn. Two websites and three web addresses.

Then there are the multiple official Kepler websites: http://www.nasa.gov/kepler/, http://kepler.arc.nasa.gov/, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/main/index.html , http://www.seti.org/kepler, and http://kepler.nasa.gov/ as well as the multiple official Cassini websites: http://www.nasa.gov/cassini , http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/main/index.html, and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/, and so on. Virtually every NASA mission has more than one "official" NASA.gov website - and in each case the websites are regularly out of synch with one another.

Probably the most blatant example whereby NASA simply cannot make its mind up as to where an official mission website is has to do with Hubble - here are the official websites: http://hubble.nasa.gov/, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html, http://hubblesite.org/, http://heritage.stsci.edu/, http://www.nasa.gov/hubble, and http://www.spacetelescope.org/. This recent hubble press release is typical. NASA offers 3 links - on three different official Hubble websites - for the same image.

I hear constant complaints from within NASA that funds for websites, education and public outreach, and PAO are limited - and likely to be cut further. Yet the agency continues to waste money on dueling websites - and they use multiple web addressses to send people to the same website. If you gave NASA more money would the number of websites decrease and efficiency of overall NASA website design increase? Doubtful. In a time when budgets are being cut, one would think that increased efficiency would be the focus - and that the number of duplicative websites would decrease and efficiency of NASA's overall website design would increase. Again, doubtful since the agency simply does not want - or care - to try and speak with one consistent, coordinated, efficient voice.

NASA OIG on IT Monitoring

NASA Faces Significant Challenges in Transitioning to a Continuous Monitoring Approach for Its Information Technology Systems

"NASA Inspector General Paul K. Martin today released a report that found significant challenges with NASA's ongoing transition from an information technology (IT) security oversight approach that relied on periodic, static assessments to one that emphasizes ongoing and continuous monitoring of Agency systems."


Loading

 



Monthly Archives

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries in the IT/Web category from December 2011.

IT/Web: November 2011 is the previous archive.

IT/Web: January 2012 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.