Military Space: June 2021 Archives

Preliminary Assessment: Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, DNI

"The UAP documented in this limited dataset demonstrate an array of aerial behaviors, reinforcing the possibility there are multiple types of UAP requiring different explanations. Our analysis of the data supports the construct that if and when individual UAP incidents are resolved they will fall into one of five potential explanatory categories: airborne clutter, natural atmospheric phenomena, USG or industry developmental programs, foreign adversary systems, and a catchall "other" bin. With the exception of the one instance where we determined with high confidence that the reported UAP was airborne clutter, specifically a deflating balloon, we currently lack sufficient information in our dataset to attribute incidents to specific explanations."

Keith's note: They waited until late on a Friday afternoon to dump this report. Nothing to see here. Move along.

The UAP Story: The SETI Institute Weighs In

"The observations to be discussed in the report - photographic, witness testimony, and radar - are sometimes conflated with a research discipline known as SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). The latter involves looking for non-natural radio or light signals coming from deep space, as well as observations that might uncover non-natural phenomena (so-called "technosignatures") in the course of conventional astronomical research. Since the UAP analysis and SETI research have a region of overlap - the possibility of alien beings - there is frequent confusion by the public and media regarding the degree to which they are similar. We hope to mitigate this lack of understanding by pointing out differences in the assumptions, data, and verification methodologies for both UAPs and SETI."

GAO: Weapon Systems Annual Assessment Updated Program Oversight Approach Needed - Excerpt: National Security Space Launch (NSSL)

Keith's note: The ULA Vulcan program has contracted with Blue Origin to provide its BE-4 rocket engine. This BE-4 engine is not referred to by name in this report, but it is what is referred to in this report.

"A U.S. produced rocket engine under development for ULA's Vulcan launch vehicle is experiencing technical challenges related to the igniter and booster capabilities required and may not be qualified in time to support first launches beginning in 2021.
A joint program office and ULA team is tracking these challenges, and NSSL officials told us Vulcan remains on track to support first launches and certification in 2021. However, if ULA cannot complete engine qualification before the 2021 flight certification, the program might continue to rely on ULA's Atlas V--which uses engines manufactured in the Russian Federation--to support ULA's 2022 launches, despite a nearly $2.9 billion investment in new launch system development. SpaceX's Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy vehicles are certified to conduct national security launches. The Falcon Heavy is undergoing some modifications to fully meet launch requirements and is on track to support its first mission in May 2021."

Keith's note: Really? NASA Wallops PAO is giving "exclusive on-pad access" to a launch pad with a classified mission sitting on it and only one media outlet gets this "exclusive on-pad access"? And they are bragging about it? And that's OK with NASA PAO? The last time I asked NASA HQ PAO about this they told me emphatically that they do not give "exclusives". WTKR News 3 is not exactly a nationally distributed news channel. Once again Wallops PAO is playing favorites with their local pals.


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This page is an archive of entries in the Military Space category from June 2021.

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