Recently in Personnel News Category

Redstone Arsenal incident update, RocketCity Now

"Redstone Arsenal Garrison Commander Col. Thomas Holliday released more information about the incident at Redstone Arsenal in an afternoon press conference. He said that while the investigation is ongoing, they have determined that there was no active shooter and no injuries. No one has been found with a weapon and there is no evidence of shots fired. It began with a pair of 911 calls at about 9:40 Tuesday morning reporting shots fired and someone seeing a weapon. That led to the response that included securing the entire arsenal."

Mutual of America Life Insurance Company Appoints Johnson Space Center Director Dr. Ellen Ochoa to its Board of Directors

"Mutual of America Life Insurance Company, which specializes in providing retirement products and related services to organizations and their employees, as well as individuals, announced the appointment of Dr. Ellen Ochoa to its Board of Directors. Mutual of America partnered with Korn Ferry's Board and CEO Practice to conduct a national search, which resulted in Dr. Ochoa's appointment."

Ellen Ochoa Appointed to Dallas Fed Board

"The Federal Reserve Board of Governors has appointed Ellen Ochoa of Houston to the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas board of directors. She will fill an unexpired term ending Dec. 31, 2017, and will be eligible for appointment to a full three-year term on the board. Ochoa previously served as chair of the Bank's Houston Branch board."

JSC Center Director Ochoa Elected to Deathcare Product Company Board, earlier post

"Service Corporation International, the largest provider of deathcare products and services in North America, today announced that it will nominate Dr. Ellen Ochoa to be elected to the SCI Board of Directors at the Company's Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held in May 2015."

Johnson Space Center's director to serve on National Science Board

"Science has always had an advocate in Dr. Ellen Ochoa, director of NASA's Johnson Space Center. Now, it is official, as Ochoa has been named the final member of the National Science Board's (NSB's) class of 2022."

Keith's note: That's four companies/organizations for whom Ellen Ochoa serves on the board of directors while also serving as Center Director for NASA Johnson Space Center. If she has the time to do all of this external stuff perhaps she is not spending enough time on her day job. Why is it that the vast majority of NASA employees are not allowed to moonlight like this - but Ochoa is allowed to do so? Just sayin'.

Charles Lundquist

Dr. Charles Arthur Lundquist

"Dr. Charles Lundquist, 89 passed away Saturday. Services will be announced by Laughlin Service Funeral Home."

Book chronicles 218 immigrants who boosted U.S. space program, UAH

"Dr. Lundquist's experience includes 50 years in high-level positions with the U.S. Army, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, NASA, and finally at UAH. He officially retired in 1999."

'Gov' Okoloise

"Governor A. Okoloise passed away on Sunday, May 21, 2017 at age 49. His family came to America from Nigeria when he was a boy. Gov, as we called him, worked at Johnson Space Center for the past 24 years. A dedicated space worker, he certified space life sciences and exercise hardware throughout the 90s. Most recently, he was responsible for the design, assembly and safety of the EMU Space suit and hardware used during ISS space walks (EVA). He was a congenial and personable friend to everyone, going out of his way to help others as much as possible."

Michael A'Hearn

via Planetary Exploration Newsletter: Mike passed away on Monday, May 29, 2017, at his home in University Park, MD. He had a deep love of science and gregarious nature, always able to make a positive difference in whatever he did. An obituary will be forthcoming. Mike was the beloved husband of Maxine C. A'Hearn; father of Brian J. (Zlata) of Oxford, UK, Kevin P. (Kanlayane) of Vienna, VA, and Patrick N. A'Hearn of Seattle, WA; grandfather of Sean, Brendan, Marie, Eliane, and Gabriel.

Matt Isakowitz

Matthew Scott Isakowitz

"Matthew found inspiration in Carl Sagan's words, "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." Matthew's invaluable contributions to the field of commercial spaceflight included working at Astranis, Planetary Resources, the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, Space Adventures, SpaceX, and the XPRIZE Foundation. He was loved by so many and will be greatly missed."

Keith's note: I am just startled and shattered by this. Matt was only 29 and yet was everything you wanted in a space explorer and crammed so much into his all too short life. He was smart, bubbling with enthusiasm, and always ready to tackle a new challenge. I first met Matt in May 2002 at the AIA rocket launch competition here in Virginia. I went to hear Sean O'Keefe officiate at the competition - his father Steve worked for O'Keefe at the time. My initial impression of Matt came when I spotted his father with several kids in tow. Due to the recent rain we were all covered in mud to some extent. Matt was still a young boy and I recall that he was clearly excited by all of the rocket launches he was seeing. Matt was also somewhat impatient with his father and clearly wanted him to dispense with saying hello to O'Keefe and I and get back to the rockets. Over the years I'd see Matt regularly and watched him become quite the space professional. Despite his age, he was fun to debate issues with since he actually knew what he was talking about. Matt was one of those people whose accomplishments I had expected to read about in my old age. Ad Astra.

Donation page, Future Space Leaders

"Matthew Isakowitz was an extraordinary young man whose passion for opening the commercial space frontier was only matched by his kindness and generosity to those around him. In his honor and memory, we are participating in an initiative to support the space-related programs that were so dear to him. Your donations will be applied toward a to-be-announced initiative that will further Matthew's legacy in the field of human space exploration."

EPA to set aside $12 million for buyouts in coming months, Washington Post

"The Environmental Protection Agency plans to set aside $12 million for buyouts and early retirements in coming months, as part of an effort to begin "reshaping" the agency's workforce under the Trump administration."

Other Agencies May Follow EPA's Lead in Offering Incentives

"While final budget decisions are to be negotiated in the months ahead with Congress, a recent OMB memo on restructuring agencies and cutting federal jobs told agencies to assume that those proposals will be approved. It also promised quick consideration of early out and buyout requests, although it did not recommend either for or against using them."

Trump's proposed retirement changes would have major impacts on current feds and retirees

"It's happened before; lawmakers and think tanks have offered their own proposals to change the federal retirement system. Despite a few initial worries, current federal employees and retirees have remained relatively unscathed. Yet that could change next year. Federal financial experts are sounding the alarm bells on the major changes to the federal retirement system included in President Donald Trump's fiscal 2018 budget -- proposals that they say would leave a significant impact on both current retirees and employees and future workers."

Keith's note: This morning the email account for the Center Director of Jet Propulsion Laboratory sent out a lab-wide email with the subject line "active shooter" (see image of full email)

From: Office Of The Director [mailto:Office.Of.The.Director@jpl.nasa.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 9:45 AM
To: all.personnel@list.jpl.nasa.gov
Subject: Active Shooter

Sources report that this caused a great deal of disturbance - just one day after shootings in Fresno. The email was not about any threat to JPL but rather describing a course about how to deal with a situation in which there is a hostile person (with a gun) in the work environment. An hour later, the same email was sent out with a different subject line - "Clarification: Training for Active Shooter Event". No one ever admitted that an error was made or apologized for freaking people out.

White House tells agencies to come up with a plan to shrink their workforces, Washington Post

"The White House on Wednesday will instruct all federal agencies to submit a plan by June 30 to shrink their civilian workforces, offering the first details on how the Trump administration aims to reduce the size and scope of the government. A governmentwide hiring freeze the president imposed on Jan. 23 will be lifted immediately. But Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters Tuesday that agency leaders must start "taking immediate actions" to save money and reduce their staffs. Mulvaney also said they must come up with a long-term blueprint to cut the number of federal workers starting in October 2018."

A $1 Bill Has Landed a NASA Scientist in a Turkish Prison for Nine Months, Houston Press

"When asked whether NASA can or will try to help Serkan, NASA spokesman Allard Beutel referred the Press to the U.S. State Department. That agency acknowledged it has no influence over Turkish authorities in this case. "We can confirm Turkish authorities arrested and detained U.S. citizen Serkan Golge last July," a U.S. State Department official stated. "We remain concerned for Mr. Golge and have raised his case with Turkish authorities. Although the United States does not have a legal right to access dual U.S.-Turkish citizens detained in Turkey, we continue to press for such access as a matter of courtesy. We have no further comment at this time." Even though NASA has stayed quiet, the scientific community has been trying to draw attention to Serkan's case. The Endangered Scholars Worldwide group and the Committee of Concerned Scientists have both issued sharply worded statements over his detention, urging that he be released. A petition has also been filed asking the White House to intervene. If the petition garners 100,000 signatures by next month, it is supposed to be reviewed by President Donald Trump. It has only about 150 signatures so far."

A NASA Scientist Has Been Imprisoned in Turkey for 8 Months, New York Times

"A NASA scientist, Serkan Golge, has spent the last eight months in a Turkish prison. An attempted coup in Turkey last summer resulted in the government arresting thousands of people on flimsy evidence, and Serkan, a Turkish-American, is one of the casualties. Serkan's case signals how bold the Turkish government has become, even imprisoning a well-regarded scientist, when the only evidence against him is a $1 bill. He will soon go to trial, facing a sentence of up to 15 years in prison for being "a member of an armed terrorist organization." There's been little domestic or international press attention to Serkan's detention, but a three-month investigation suggests the injustice surrounding the case of a man caught in a national hurricane. ... Serkan, 37, has been working at NASA for the past three years as a senior research scientist studying space radiation effects on the human crew at the International Space Station. He first traveled to the United States in 2003 and gained American citizenship in 2010."

Petition

Keith's note: One of the signs on a reserved chair in the NAC meeting room has a name tag for Shana Dale with titles "Chief of Staff (acting)" and "Senior White House Advisor" on it. One would assume that she assumed these roles when Trump transition team member Erik Noble (who had these jobs) left NASA last week. It is my understanding that she is only at NASA on loan from FAA for a few months.

Jen Rae Wang Appointed to Head NASA's Office of Communications

"Jen Rae Wang has been selected by Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot as NASA's Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications. Wang joins NASA with more than a decade of experience at the highest levels of state and federal government in public, legislative, and media affairs both domestically and internationally, strategic communications, as well as small and large-scale organizational executive leadership."

Trump's Team at EPA Vetting 'Controversial' Public Meetings and Presentations, Pro Publica

"Wang helped lead the Trump presidential campaign in Nebraska and last month had been announced as a deputy chief of staff to newly elected U.S. Rep. Don Bacon, a Nebraska Republican."

Keith's trivia note: If Rep. Bridenstine is named NASA Administrator he and Jen Rae Wang have something to talk about: swimming. He holds the Oklahoma record in 200 meter swimming (freestyle, relay) and Jen Rae Wang has an entry in U.S. Masters swimming.

Keith's note: Erik Noble, a member of the Trump Beachhead team at NASA headquarters has departed NASA for a position at NOAA. Noble had been serving as Chief of Staff on the 9th floor. No word yet as to who is replacing him in that position.

Firing federal workers isn't as easy as Trump makes it seem in his budget, Washington Post

"Under President Trump's budget proposal, federal employees at many agencies may need to acquaint themselves with a lately dormant but still much-feared term: Reduction in Force. If Trump's budget is enacted into law, it would hike defense spending by $54 billion - and pay for it with an equal cut in domestic spending at other federal agencies. Trump has said that reducing the size of the federal workforce -- better known by its acronym, RIF - is a top priority. It may not be as easy as Trump would like. Laying off federal workers requires going through a formal process that can be lengthy, expensive and disruptive to the workplace, experts say. And various legal and union rights may come into play, as they do for the similarly complex process of firing a federal worker for misconduct."

What is a RIF? A federal worker's guide to the Trump budget, Washington Post

Trump budget expected to seek historic contraction of federal workforce, Washington Post

"Preliminary budget documents have also shown that Trump advisers have also looked at cutting the Environmental Protection Agency's staff by about 20 percent and tightening the Commerce Department's budget by about 18 percent, which would impact climate change research and weather satellite programs, among other things. Trump and his advisers have said that they believe the federal workforce is too big, and that the federal government spends - and wastes - too much money. They have said that Washington - the federal workers and contractors, among others - has benefited from government largesse while many other Americans have suffered. Federal spending, they have argued, crowds the private sector and piles regulations and bureaucracy onto companies. Trump's chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, has said Trump will lead a "deconstruction of the administrative state." On Friday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Obama loyalists had "burrowed into government." Last month, Trump said the government would have to "do more with less."

NASA Kennedy Seeks Media Nominations for 'Chroniclers' Awards, NASA

"NASA's Kennedy Space Center is soliciting members of the working news media for names of former colleagues they deem worthy of designation as a space program "Chronicler" at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida. "The Chroniclers" program honors broadcasters, journalists, authors, contractor public relations representatives and NASA Public Affairs officers who excelled in sharing news from Kennedy about U.S. efforts in space exploration with the American public and the world. Deadline for submissions is close of business Monday, March 20, 2017."

Keith's note: I just nominated the late Frank Sietzen for the NASA Chroniclers Award. Frank and I wrote a book together. He served as editor for Ad Astra Magazine, wrote for UPI, served as Charlie Bolden's speech writer, and covered all aspects of space exploration for decades. He lived and breathed space. Were he here with us today he'd be sitting on the edge of his seat covering all of the changes that are going on within the space community. Please consider nominating him. He earned it.Here's how.

Federal workers grow increasingly nervous about Trump's proposed budget cuts, Washington Post

"To the president and his supporters who see a bloated bureaucracy with lots of duplication and rules that choke jobs, the budget cuts are a necessary first step to make government run more efficiently. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said this week that non-military spending will take the "largest-proposed reduction since the early years of the Reagan administration." To prepare for that possibility, agencies are preparing to shave 10 percent off their budgets, on average. And words like buyouts, furloughs and RIFs (or reduction in force) - government-speak for layoffs - are now being tossed around at the water cooler as civil servants face the possibility of massive downsizing. Some of these strategies were used when Ronald Reagan was president and others more recently to meet the goals of budget caps known as sequestration."

Keith's note: As you all know it is much harder to lay off government employees than contractor employes. Yet that now seems to be what is in the plans. But if NASA is faced with making substantial cuts in its expenses then you can be assured that contractor personnel will bear a large part of the pain. Contractor employees have far fewer protections than civil servants. Also, in the past when budgets have gotten tight NASA has delayed solicitations, delayed and decreased the number of awards, and the cut the value of awards. With huge cuts in its budget looming on the horizon, you can expect that NASA procurement practices will respond to these cuts with surprising speed.

At the NASA Planetary Science Vision 2050 Workshop this week I asked a panel a question noting that there were "some very depressed people up on the 9th floor working on the budget passback to OMB". I asked the panel "what sort of box outside of which they needed to be thinking they had yet to think outside of" when it came to dealing with these looming budget cuts. The panel dodged the question and paradoxically started to talk about doing more things rather than less. I reiterated the harsh reality that goes with a President who "thinks potholes are more important than planets". Alas, the panel continued along their merry way in denial with some throw away lines such as "clearly we need to be doing things cheaper".

A storm is coming folks. You cannot hide under your desks and try and to ride it out. Not this time. You need to be preparing contingency plans and be ready to try things that you have never tried before to accomplish the tasks you have been given to do. Otherwise those things will not get done.

Keith's note: According to her Wikipedia page Lesa Roe "is currently serving as the Acting Deputy Administrator of NASA. Roe is also the Deputy Associate Administrator of NASA, being in role since May 2014.". I cannot find any announcement from NASA or the White House that she was appointed to the position of Acting NASA Deputy Administrator.

The Wikipedia page was last revised to add Roe's new position on 1 February 2017 by someone named "Hosgeorges" from the UK. On 22 February 2017 someone named دارين added a picture of Lesa Roe. Prior to that Roe's Wikipedia page was last changed on 8 May 2016. This senior leadership page on NASA.gov only mentions Robert Lightfoot as Acting NASA Administrator. But this page at NASA.gov (last changed on 10 February 2017) says "Deputy Administrator: Lesa Roe (acting)". So Hosgeorges in the UK knew about this NASA management change nearly a month ago - and NASA quietly added it to its website 2 weeks ago - but no one thought to put a memo out for the rest if us?

But wait: there's more: This page links to a NASA Advisory Council page shows a group portrait of the NAC with former NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden and refers to "Mr. Kenneth Bowersox (NAC Interim Chair)". Yet this page mentions the NAC and says "Chair: General Lester L. Lyles (USAF, Ret.)"

On 20 January 2017 Robert Lightfoot sent out a memo "Message from the Acting Administrator of NASA" which said "As the transition progresses, we have some initial assignments from the new administration. Erik Noble has been named White House Senior Advisor at NASA. Greg Autry, who was with the Agency Review Team, has been named White House Liaison."

According to this current NASA Organization Structure page last updated 10 February 2017 Erik Noble is now "Chief of Staff (acting)". According to multiple sources Greg Autry told people that he would be leaving his White House Liaison position at NASA effective 17 March 2017. But he left on 23 February instead. Oddly, the page was last updated on 10 February 2017 yet made no mention of Autry despite the importance of his position at the time.

Things are starting to get a little strange when NASA makes significant agency appointments like this and does not tell anyone else - except Hosgeorges and دارين that is.

White House prepping government reorg executive order, Federal News Radio

"The White House is preparing a new executive order to require agencies to plan and suggest ways to reorganize the government. Federal News Radio has learned that a draft order is circulating in the government and could be issued this week after the expected Senate confirmation of Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) to be the director of the Office of Management and Budget. The draft order includes a series of requirements for agencies to quickly turn around plans to improve how the department meets its mission. The draft also details a list of elements the agencies need to include in those plans ranging from a list of programs that are duplicative to whether state and local governments or the private sector could do the work better to the costs of ending or merging the capabilities. The draft order also calls on agencies to determine if back-office functions are duplicative with other services within another agency, bureau or program and if so, could they be consolidated."

Zero Base Review Team Report, 19 May 1995 (earlier NASA RIF Watch post)

"An internal NASA review team has produced proposals to enable the agency to meet the tough funding targets set by the Administration in the 1996 budget, Administrator Daniel S. Goldin said today. The proposals include sweeping management and organizational changes to cut spending an additional $5 billion by the end of the decade. "I'm pleased with what I've seen so far," Goldin said. "We've found ways to streamline operations, reduce overlap, and significantly cut costs without cutting our world-class space and aeronautics programs. We have much hard work before us, but I believe a stronger and more efficient NASA will emerge."

Phil Sabelhaus

"Dear Members Of The JWST Family, It is with much sorrow that I must tell you that our friend and colleague Phil Sabelhaus has passed away. Phil was a friend and mentor. Without Phil's leadership and wisdom over the years he was the JWST project manager, we would not be where we are today. The Flight Control Room at the JWST Mission Operations Center will be named in his honor. When thinking of the right words to describe Phil, I thought of the song "Oysters and Pearls" by Jimmy Buffett, which is about the differences between people who love to lead and take risks and those who are content with following."

Neil Gehrels

Goddard Center Director Remarks on Passing of Neil Gehrels

"Throughout his success, Neil always found time to share his achievements with others. Following in the footsteps of his father, an astronomer who helped dissident scientists during the Cold War, Neil and his family were active volunteers in disadvantaged communities around Goddard. In 2005, he helped develop an internship program that allowed local high school students with hardships to work in his labs. "Neil leaves behind a legacy only he could have created, and words cannot adequately express our grief for this great loss."

Robert Braun named new dean of engineering and applied science, University of Colorado Boulder

"University of Colorado Boulder Provost Russell L. Moore today announced the appointment of Robert D. Braun as dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 2003, Braun worked at the NASA Langley Research Center for 16 years."

White House, SpaceX Veteran Phil Larson Joining CU Boulder, University of Colorado Boulder

"The University of Colorado Boulder's College of Engineering and Applied Science Dean Bobby Braun is announcing the appointment of Phil Larson as assistant dean for communications, strategy, and planning, where he will lead strategic relations for the college. Larson - who was senior advisor for space and innovation at the White House, where he served from 2009 to 2014 - will join CU Boulder in February. Most recently, Larson was part of Elon Musk's SpaceX team, supporting communications efforts as well as managing corporate projects."

Keith's note: Last week NASA HQ was told by the incoming Trump administration that they wanted Chief Financial Officer David Radzanowski to stay on for while after the Inauguration to help with the transition. Then the Trump people suddenly changed their minds and Dave was no longer a NASA employee at noon on Friday. As such Dave did not have a proper chance to say farewell to folks at NASA. Before he was CFO he was the NASA Chief of Staff. Dave is one of those people in government that most folks never hear of. He just did his job diligently without any arm waving and did it exceptionally well. Dave was absolutely vital to how NASA worked - especially when it worked well. Its too bad he was not able to have a proper send off. You done good, Dave.

Revenge of the bureaucrats, Politico

"The Trump personnel team led by Kay Coles James and Linda Springer, both also Bush alumni, has broad goals to reduce the size of domestic agencies while slightly bolstering the defense workforce, say sources close to the transition. Aides are also mulling a process, known as "reduction in force," that would allow the new administration to skirt the civil service's complicated rules for hiring and firing. The easiest way to make such reductions might be through budget cuts to each agency, which would be outlined in Trump's first budget proposal this spring."

Trump freezes hiring of many federal workers, Washington Post

"President Trump instituted a governmentwide hiring freeze Monday, signing an executive order that he said would affect all employees "except for the military."

How Trump Could Unravel Obama's Science Legacy, Scientific American

"The much-larger ranks of non-political 'career' employees, meanwhile, could shrink under Trump, who has pledged to freeze federal hiring within his first 100 days in office. Staffing levels at science agencies - which stayed relatively flat under Obama, despite his enthusiasm for research - could eventually dwindle by attrition."

Gene Cernan

Family Statement Regarding the Passing of Apollo Astronaut Eugene Cernan, Last Man to Walk on the Moon

"The family of Apollo Astronaut Capt. Eugene Cernan, the last man to walk on the Moon, announced that he passed away today following ongoing health issues. "It is with very deep sadness that we share the loss of our beloved husband and father," said Cernan's family. "Our family is heartbroken, of course, and we truly appreciate everyone's thoughts and prayers. Gene, as he was known by so many, was a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend." "Even at the age of 82, Gene was passionate about sharing his desire to see the continued human exploration of space and encouraged our nation's leaders and young people to not let him remain the last man to walk on the Moon," the family continued."

NASA Administrator Reflects on Legacy of Last Man to Walk on Moon

NASA Reflects on Legacy of Eugene Cernan and Other Videos

Harriet Jenkins, The History Makers

"From 1974 until 1992, Jenkins worked as the assistant administrator for equal opportunity programs at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ... From 1992 until 1996, she worked with the U.S. Congress and served as the director at the Office of Senate Fair Employment Practices in the U.S. Senate. ... Jenkins retired from the federal government in 1996. In 2000, NASA established a fellowship program in her name, awarding doctoral fellowships to qualifying minority students. She is the recipient of numerous awards and honors including placing her retirement in the Congressional Record."

UPDATE: The viewing for Dr. Jenkins are listed below:

Harriett Jenkins

Dr. Harriett G. Jenkins, has passed away. Funeral Services and other details forthcoming.

Harriet Jenkins, The History Makers

"From 1974 until 1992, Jenkins worked as the assistant administrator for equal opportunity programs at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ... From 1992 until 1996, she worked with the U.S. Congress and served as the director at the Office of Senate Fair Employment Practices in the U.S. Senate. ... Jenkins retired from the federal government in 1996. In 2000, NASA established a fellowship program in her name, awarding doctoral fellowships to qualifying minority students. She is the recipient of numerous awards and honors including placing her retirement in the Congressional Record."

The viewing for Dr. Jenkins will be at:
McGuire Funeral Service, Inc
7400 Georgia Ave NW
Washington DC 20012
202-882-6600
Sunday, January 8, 2017
2-4 p.m.

"Please join NASA's Office of Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs in celebrating Seth's departure on a new journey. Thursday, January 12, 2017 4 - 7 p.m., Room 2E39, NASA Headquarters $15 suggested contribution RSVP: congressionalevents@nasa.gov"

Keith's note: Best wishes, Seth, as you return to the real world ;-)

John Glenn

Statement by the President on the Passing of John Glenn

"The last of America's first astronauts has left us, but propelled by their example we know that our future here on Earth compels us to keep reaching for the heavens. On behalf of a grateful nation, Godspeed, John Glenn."

Statement by NASA Administrator Bolden on the Passing of John Glenn

"The entire NASA Family will be forever grateful for his outstanding service, commitment and friendship. Personally, I shall miss him greatly. As a fellow Marine and aviator, he was a mentor, role model and, most importantly, a dear friend."

ASU university explorer Scott Parazynski remembers his colleague and friend, astronaut and former U.S. Sen. John Glenn

"I first got to spend time with him in January of 1998 after he became part of our crew. He walked in to the crew in a really unique and funny way. He said, 'If any of you guys call me Sen. Glenn, I'll ignore you. My name is just John or Payload Specialist No. 2.' That kind of set it. He just wanted to be one of the crew, no special treatment or favors. A very down-to-earth, humble guy."

The otherworldly spirit of John Glenn, Homer Hickam, Washington Post

"Ironically, John Glenn, the Mercury astronaut most Americans can still name, was the quiet one. He was strong and steady and never in any manner outlandish. He touched us in a different way. There was something about that balding, red-headed Marine with his lopsided smile that just made people love him. It seemed to those of us following the space race back then that everything Glenn did, his Midwestern, "aw shucks" manner of speech, his obvious love for and dedication to his wife, Annie, even his daily jogs along the Cape Canaveral beach, was pure and wholesomely American."

Keith's note: I got this as a text message via satellite phone from astrobiologist Dale Andersen on the shores of Lake Untersee in Antarctica this afternoon: "John Glenn was for me and for so many others of my generation a hero, a legend and The Right Stuff - an icon of space exploration. Interestingly, we just (minutes ago) finished watching Apollo 13 this evening - a wonderful story and a great film (and even better once one has read the flight log end to end). I hope the sacrifices made by those early space pioneers will not be squandered and that they will be honored by our country by re-energizing our space program - one dedicated to exploration, innovation and placing humans back on the surface of the moon and on Mars in the very, very near future. Its time to invest in science, engineering and imagination once again and to move well beyond LEO! From the mountains of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. Dale"

Aleta Jackson

Loretta (Aleta) Jackson, obituary
Aleta Jackson, LinkedIn

According to Agile Aero: "Loretta 'Aleta' Jackson has over 40 years' experience in the aerospace community, starting with electronics research and prototype development with McDonnell Douglas on the Gemini program. She has been chief researcher for several small electronics and engineering firms in Tucson, Arizona. Some of the projects she has worked on include Manned Orbiting Laboratory, StarTracker, the Tomahawk cruise missile program, Strategic Defense Initiative Organization and the Delta Clipper/Clipper Graham DC-X. For over ten years Aleta served as editor of the Journal of Practical Applications in Space. Her articles have been published in the Washington Post, Analog and technical magazines. In September, 1999, she was one of the founders of XCOR Aerospace, the others being Jeff Greason, Dan DeLong and Doug Jones."

Keith's note: I have known Aleta forever it would seem. Every interaction and every email was always positive. And nearly every email mentioned cats. There were cats wandering around XCOR's hangar that she looked out for. I asked her once if they climbed up inside the rockets. This link she sent me in response. Ad Astra Aleta

Heads Up NASA Employees

Trump has a plan for government workers. They're not going to like it., Washington Post

"President-elect Donald Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress are drawing up plans to take on the government bureaucracy they have long railed against, by eroding job protections and grinding down benefits that federal workers have received for a generation. Hiring freezes, an end to automatic raises, a green light to fire poor performers, a ban on union business on the government's dime and less generous pensions - these are the contours of the blueprint emerging under Republican control of Washington in January. These changes were once unthinkable to federal employees, their unions and their supporters in Congress. But Trump's election as an outsider promising to shake up a system he told voters is awash in "waste, fraud and abuse" has conservatives optimistic that they could do now what Republicans have been unable to do in the 133 years since the modern civil service was created."

Sam Venneri

Samuel Venneri, Washington Post

"Sam had a love of aviation, which he carried throughout his life. He had an impressive Federal career with NASA, which began in 1981, where he held several positions, most notably Chief Technologist from 1996 until his retirement in October 2002. During a portion of that time, he also served as Associate Administrator for Aerospace Technology. While at NASA, Sam received several Presidential Rank Awards."

NASA GSFC Internal Memo: Frank Cepollina Retirement

"This is truly one of the most difficult memos I have ever written to you. We have worked long and hard to develop capabilities for this Agency and for the federal government. These capabilities are truly needed. Some of our efforts started as early as 1970, but few are here today to talk about it - except for me, and that is what this memorandum is all about. I have come to the conclusion that after almost 57 years with the government it is time to retire. It has not been an easy decision. I have been thinking and rethinking my decision, and changing my mind for quite some time now. In the end, I decided to submit my papers and will retire on January 3, 2017."

NASA Ames workers worry over Superfund site's toxins, Mountain View Voice

"More recently, a 2013 U.S. Department of Defense report found toxic vapor levels exceeding EPA limits inside several occupied buildings at Moffett Federal Airfield, including the NASA Ames convention center and the flight systems research lab. ... Based on the mounting concerns, NASA administrators on Oct. 19 held a first-ever town hall meeting to address issues surrounding the Superfund site. The room was packed with a standing-room only crowd of about 120 people. A panel of officials from NASA, EPA and OSHA gave assurances that employees' health and safety was a paramount priority."

Pacific Southwest, Region 9: Superfund: Middlefield-Ellis-Whisman (MEW) Study Area, EPA

Contamination plume map

Space Biologists Thora Halstead and Ken Souza Honored Aboard International Space Station

"A small plant growth chamber orbiting in space was remotely dedicated in Cleveland Saturday evening. At the annual meeting of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research (ASGSRC) it was announced that the Veggie unit aboard the International Space Station has been dedicated to Thora Halstead and Ken Souza. A special plaque has been affixed to the Veggie hardware by astronaut Kate Rubin. Copies of that plaque were flown in space and then returned to Earth were presented to Ken and Thora's families this evening."

More Problems For Arecibo

Arecibo Observatory hit with discrimination lawsuit, Nature

"Two former researchers at the troubled Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico have filed a lawsuit claiming that illegal discrimination and retaliation led to their dismissal. James Richardson and Elizabeth Sternke are suing the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), which oversees radio astronomy and planetary science at Arecibo, and the observatory's deputy director, Joan Schmelz -- a prominent advocate for women in astronomy. ... The EEOC ultimately found evidence of discrimination and that Sternke and Richardson were terminated in retaliation for their complaints, according to documents provided by the researchers' lawyer. In their lawsuit, filed on 4 October in the US District Court in Puerto Rico, Richardson and Sternke are seeking more than US$20 million in back pay and damages."

Taking In The View From Wharton Ridge, SpaceRef

"Today I learned that a feature on the surface of Mars has been named after a friend of mine. This was not unexpected since I knew that his name was in the queue waiting for just the right feature to be discovered by the Opportunity rover. "Wharton Ridge" is named after Robert A. Wharton (Bob). Bob was born a few years before me in 1951 and died unexpectedly in 2012. I worked with Bob at the old Life Sciences Division at NASA Headquarters in the late 1980s."

David Webb

Keith's note: I learned last night that David Webb has died. I first met David 30 years ago when I was just entering the space business. He was always willing to offer advice, a spare bedroom when I visited DC, and offer introductions to people in the business. I was not alone in receiving his mentorship. Indeed, over the years, I suspect that everyone in the space community benefited from his interests and activities. A look at his Wikipedia entry may seem voluminous but it is woefully incomplete. He was a gentle soul. Ad Astra.

David C. Webb, Wikipedia

David Weaver Is Leaving NASA

Keith's note: Sources report that NASA Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications David Weaver is leaving the agency for a position at the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA).

David S. Weaver, NASA Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications

"David Weaver became NASA's associate administrator for the Office of Communications on July 18, 2010. Weaver is a senior public administration professional with 25 years of experience in government, politics, media relations and public policy."

Woody Bethay

Joseph Arwood Bethay

"He entered the US Army Ordnance Corp in 1957 and was assigned to the Army Guided Missile Agency at Redstone Arsenal where he managed development of ground support equipment for the Corporal Missile System and warhead development for the Sergeant Missile System. Woody joined Marshal Space Flight Center in 1960. In his 35 years at MSFC he worked on research and development programs including the Saturn, Skylab, High Energy Astronomy Observatories, Space Shuttle, Spacelab, Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra. He retired from NASA in 1995 as the Associate Director of MSFC."

Don Curry

Don Curry, Clayton Funeral Homes

"He loved his work at NASA and was involved with every program, from Mercury through the Space Shuttle, before retiring after 45 years. He became one of the world's leading experts on thermal protection systems, receiving much recognition for his work. Don was respected and beloved by his colleagues who referred to him as "The Legend."

Donald M. Curry, NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project Edited Oral History Transcript

"I think most people that worked on the Apollo program out here worked for no extra pay because we were too interested in it. It was too much of a challenge because there wasn't anything known. When [President John F.] Kennedy said, "We're going to the Moon," well, we didn't even have the material. We didn't have the guidance schemes. We'd never done some of these things. We'd only flown one Mercury flight, in fact."

Frank Sietzen

Keith's note: My long time friend and collaborator Frank Sietzen Jr. passed away comfortably on Sunday. Born in May 1952, Frank as a consumate space advocate, historian, policy analyst, and journalist. He lived and breathed space. We wrote a book together a few years ago "New Moon Rising" about the Bush Administration's "Vision for Exploration". Indeed, we broke the story of this new plan's existence on the front page of the Washington Times. Frank worked for everyone, so it seems: among others the Space Transportation Association, Aerospace America, SpaceX, UPI, and served as a speech writer for NASA Administrator Bolden. A full resume and bibliography would fill pages. Frank lived his entire adult life amidst space policy. Nearly every phone call with Frank started with "You'll never guess what I just learned" As such, if there is one thing that I think Frank would ask if his life's work were to be analyzed, it would be "well, did you learn something?" I sure did.

Ad Astra Frank.

Arrangements and other details to follow.

Doug O'Handley

Doug O'Handley, Indomitable​ Influence for Hundreds of Space Professionals, Passes

"Douglas Alexander O'Handley, Ph.D., died peacefully at home in Morgan Hill, California July 28, 2016, at the age of 79. ... In the mid-1990s, Doug created and taught a multi-disciplinary undergraduate course in astrobiology at Santa Clara University. He - and the course - were wildly popular. From this course and the program initiated by Jerry Soffen at NASA Goddard, the seeds were planted for the NASA Ames Astrobiology Academy - a summer leadership development program committed to excellence that has operated for nearly 20 years (later the Space Exploration Academy). The Academy catalyzed and inspired the lives of more than 240 students, many of whom are now well-established in scientific disciplines and careers around the country, ranging from NASA flight surgeons and principal investigators on multiple missions, to leaders inspiring others with their careers in academia, government and industry. Doug and Christy drew enormous pleasure from hosting the students that each year brought to their home on evenings, weekends and holidays - whether skiing with astronauts at Squaw Valley, boating on Lake Tahoe or backyard BBQs. The Academy students quickly became a part of Doug's family, always welcome at any time. Doug was present for many life events of his former students, including officiating three weddings and introducing more than a dozen couples who are now married."

----

"We invite you to join us at St. Catherine of Alexandria Catholic Church in Morgan Hill, California, on Saturday, August 20, at 2 p.m. for a mass in honor of Doug and a reception to follow to enjoy the many wonderful memories and accomplishments."

Keith's note: Doug was doing things 20 years ago that no one else at NASA was doing - before there was social media, STEM, NASA socials, etc. While lots of "education" people talk about education and put out powerpoint slides, Doug rolled up his sleeves and just made things happen. More than once Doug would invite me to give his students a lecture on "How To Break the Rules at NASA". He wanted them to know how the place really worked. His efforts led directly to the inspiration of a large number of very fine young people - many of whom work in the NASA family. Doug and his wife took each class of students into his home as if they were family. There are hundreds of students whose careers went into overdrive as a direct result of Doug O'Handley and the NASA Academy. Each one of them has a story to tell - each story points to the enduring power of NASA as a motivator - with Doug holding a hand while also holding a big magnifying glass and bull horn to accentuate the effect. One only has to look at Doug's Facebook page to see the responses from students who have learned of his passing. Doug leaves behind a living, breathing legacy that will endure and expand for decades - one that will expand off this planet.
Ad Astra Doug.

Thora Halstead

Keith's note: The funeral of Dr. Thora Halstead will be held Friday, 29 July at 3:00 pm at Fort Myer's Old Post Chapel in Arlington, VA. followed by internment at Arlington National Cemetery.

Thora retired from NASA Life Sciences in 1994, where she was the Manager of the Space Biology Program; Life and Biomedical Sciences and Applications Division.

- Thora Halstead, earlier post

Molly Macauley (Update)

Celebration of Life for Molly Macauley Scheduled for July 23 in Baltimore, SpacePolicyOnline

"A celebration of life service for Molly Macauley is planned for July 23, 2016 in Baltimore, MD. Macauley, a highly respected member of the space policy community, was murdered on July 8 while walking her dogs near her home in Baltimore."

Woman dies after being stabbed in Roland Park, Baltimore Sun

"A 59-year-old woman was fatally stabbed in Baltimore's Roland Park neighborhood as she was walking her dogs Friday night, police said. Officers were called to the 600 block of W. University Parkway around 11 p.m. and found the victim, Molly K. Macauley. She was taken to an area hospital, where she died."

Dawn Brooke Owens

Keith's note: Brooke Owens has left the planet. Ad Astra.

A memorial service for Brooke Owens will be held at Clear Creek Community Church, in League City, TX, at 10:00am on Saturday July 9th. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Brooke's name to one of the three following organizations:

Friends Thru The Fight (FTTF), a local non-profit which supports breast cancer patients through their treatment and were present in loving on Brooke and her family over the past few months, by visiting friendsthruthefight.org.

AidChild, a non-profit organization that Brooke served with that supports orphans living with HIV/AIDS who do not have the support of extended families in Uganda, by visiting http://aidchild.org/.

Mercy's Village International, an organization that Brooke served with dedicated to fighting poverty through the education of children and the empowerment of girls and young women, by http://www.mercysvillage.org/.

If you have any photos, memories or things like poetry or songs of or by Brooke, please send them to dawnbrookeowensmemorial - at - gmail.com

Patti Grace Smith

Patti Grace Smith, Champion of Private Space Travel, Dies at 68, NY Times

"In an email, Elon Musk, the PayPal and Tesla entrepreneur who founded SpaceX, a company that has developed launch vehicles, wrote that Ms. Smith had "helped lay the foundations for a new era in American spaceflight." "We are closer to becoming a multiplanet species because of her efforts," he added."

Keith's note: There was a time when Patti was the only person in the entire Federal government who was thinking seriously about commercial space. At that time, no one else really cared. She did. Look what happened.

Keith's update: Patti's family requests in lieu of flowers that donations can be made to the American Cancer Society in Patti's name. Patti's "Home-Going" Service will be held Monday, 13 June at 11:00 am at the Mount Sinai Baptist Church 1615 3rd St. NW in Washington, DC.

Tiffany Moisan

NASA scientist's body found in Princess Anne, Delmarva Now

"Tiffany Moisan, 48, a resident of Kemps Nursery Road in Princess Anne, was found in a wooded area behind the Food Lion store on Brittingham Lane, police said. There were no apparent signs of foul play."

Tiffany A Moisan Bio, NASA GSFC

"My research interests are in phytoplankton physiology and optics with relationships to taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton community. My interests are in the Ocean Color Mission and Global Climate Change. I also have interests in NASA Education and Public Outreach."

Keith's note: A month ago I posted news that NASA Advisory Council chair Steve Squyres had sent an email to the NAC and to NASA - resigning as chair of the NAC. In the month that followed this posting NASA has said nothing about the status of the NAC. If you go to the NAC home page at NASA nothing has changed in terms of NAC membership (including people whose terms have expired). Squyres is also listed here as NAC chair. Although the NAC discussed having a meeting in Cleveland in July no future meeting dates are listed here.

NASA Advisory Council Chair Steve Squyres Resigns, earlier post

Jim Busby

James Busby Passes Away, File770

"Space flight historian James Milton Busby died June 1 after a lengthy hospitalization. He was 61 years old, and had suffered many health problems in recent years. He is survived by his wife, Arlene, a longtime LASFS member. They married in 2012. James volunteered and consulted with the California Museum of Science and Industry in Los Angeles on the 1980 redesign of their aerospace museum. He was hired in 1984 as a museum assistant and was employed there until 2003. The museum awarded James with an Honorary Doctorate degree of Space Science Information."

Keith's note: I knew Jim since - I dunno - 30+ years ago. He was such a sweet guy. We are very, very close in age so this hits home very hard. I used to work at Rockwell Downey so he and I regularly interacted over the years. The last time I saw Jim was several years ago. I was asked to be a speaker at the opening of the Columbia Memorial Space Center - a Challenger Learning Center - located on the old Rockwell Downey lot. As it happens the place I stood to speak is where I used to park my car. Jim was in his element as they worked through preserving things from the glory days at Downey. Whatever does remain from that place - from that time - is due in great part to Jim's un-wavering dedication. Jim was the space cadet's space cadet. They just don't make people like him any more. Oh yes - he plays that Grumman guy tapping his pencil in episode 5 of "From the Earth to the Moon." He just oozed space. Ad Astra, Jim.

Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate

"The Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate is a senior level position responsible for providing executive leadership, overall planning, direction, and effective management of NASA programs concerned with the scientific exploration of the Earth, Moon, Mars and beyond, including charting the best route of discovery and reaping the benefits of Earth and space exploration for society."

Guy Thibodaux

Joseph Guy Thibodaux, Jr.

"In 1964, Guy and his family moved to Houston, TX where he assumed the role of Chief of the Propulsion and Power Division at the Johnson Space Center until his retirement in 1980. Guy holds five patents on solid rockets and solid rocket manufacturing techniques."

- Joseph G. "Guy" Thibodaux Oral History Interviews, NASA JSC

Michael Watkins Named Next JPL Director

"Michael M. Watkins, the Clare Cockrell Williams Centennial Chair in Aerospace Engineering and Director of the Center for Space Research at The University of Texas at Austin, has been appointed director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and vice president at Caltech, the Institute announced today. Watkins will formally assume his position on July 1, 2016. He succeeds Charles Elachi, who will retire as of June 30, 2016, and move to the Caltech faculty."

NASA Welcomes New Director for its Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Bob Ryan

Robert Samuel "Bob" Ryan

"Mr. Ryan worked as an aerospace engineer for the Army Ballistic Agency. He worked on Redstone, Jupiter, and Pershing missiles and then the Explorer, JUNO satellites and the Saturn I Launch system. In 1960 the Von Braun team was transferred to NASA, and he started working on the Apollo program where he served as chief of the Dynamic Analysis Branch for Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He has served in various management and leadership positions for MSFC as Branch Chief, Division Chief of Structural Dynamics, and retired as Deputy Director of the System Dynamics Laboratory. He worked on Saturn V Apollo, Skylab, Hubble Space Telescope, HEAO, Space Shuttle, AXAF, X-33, Spacelab, and numerous scientific payloads."

Brian Bole

Family of former NASA contractor killed in Oakland seeks answers, SF Chronicle

"He was really excited about his life and the work he was doing," his mother, Patricia Tezzas, recalled of their phone conversation. "He was going to go camping next weekend." Bole got his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech before moving to California in 2011 for an internship with NASA, his family said. He was eventually hired as a contractor for NASA's Ames Research Center on the Peninsula, and within the last year started working at the Armus job. His family remembered him as an avid traveler, science fiction reader and biker."

- Brian Bole, NASA ARC Intelligent Systems Division
- Brian Bole, LinkedIn

John Grunsfeld Announces Retirement from NASA

"John Grunsfeld will retire from NASA April 30, capping nearly four decades of science and exploration with the agency. His tenure includes serving as astronaut, chief scientist, and head of NASA's Earth and space science activities. Grunsfeld has directed NASA's Science Mission Directorate as associate administrator since 2012, managing more than 100 science missions -- many of which have produced groundbreaking science, findings and discoveries."

Keith's note: Click here you will see a larger version of this image. In it John was "vulcanized" by Star Trek's Mike Okuda when John left his NASA Chief Scientist position. This photo somehow made its way to the National Air and Space Museum where a less-than-observant curator made it part of an exhibit of Hubble hardware returned after a servicing mission. Eventually NASM figured out that John was a Vulcan in this picture (but not in real life) and replaced it. But it took a while.

Ken Souza

Keith's note: I was deeply saddened to learn that my long time friend Ken Souza died suddenly yesterday. Ken was probably the first NASA life scientist I got to know when I started with NASA in the mid-1980s. Ken worked on just about every imaginable type of life science mission one could imagine and just had so much information in his head. I wondered how he had managed to know so many things. Over the years, as a mentor and a friend, he would impart a lot of technical knowledge, advice - and always, humor. During times when NASA seemed to want to walk away from space biology he kept it alive at NASA Ames. Ken was relentless in terms of his energy and never seemed to rest - even after he had technically retired from NASA. In fact the retirement designation in 2002 after 35 years at NASA Ames research Center meant that he could just stay equally busy doing more of what he wanted to do without all of the management headaches. A lot of us in the space biology family are a bit numb right now. At the time of his death Ken was engaged in putting together a memorial for his long-time friend and colleague Thora Halstead who had passed away just a few days earlier. Last week I remarked that space botanist Mark Watney from "The Martian" owed his life to Thora Halstead's long legacy at the helm of NASA's space biology program. Let me amend that. Mark Watney owed his Mars farming smarts equally to Thora's program management and Ken's trail blazing hardware. Together they were the first to do so many things in space. Ad astra Ken.

Ken Souza - Rest in Peace among the stars, ASGSR

Bob Ebeling

Challenger Engineer Who Warned Of Shuttle Disaster Dies, NPR

"Bob Ebeling spent a third of his life consumed with guilt about the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. But at the end of his life, his family says, he was finally able to find peace. "It was as if he got permission from the world," says his daughter Leslie Ebeling Serna. "He was able to let that part of his life go." Ebeling died Monday at age 89 in Brigham City, Utah, after a long illness, according to his daughter Kathy Ebeling."

Thora Halstead

Keith's note: When I first came to Washington in 1986 I had the extreme pleasure of working with Thora at NASA Headquarters. Thora learned her craft from the very first people to send living things into space and I had the distinct honor of learning about those early days from her. She practically invented space biology. She was always fun to work with and had a soft spot when it came to young people. She was instrumental in the founding of ASGSB - now ASGSR - an organization which had the interests of students deeply embedded in its core mission. When budget cuts threatened many researchers she did her best to keep everyone's work alive and defended their interests like a mother wolverine.

She was quite a pioneer - as a scientist and as a woman working at NASA at a time when few women had a chance to run large programs. If anyone can be called a founder of space biology, it was Thora Halstead. Since the film "The Martian" strove for accuracy - and Mark Watney was a space botanist - then it follows that his thesis advisor's thesis advisor's thesis advisor owed something directly to Thora Halstead's commitment to advancing the careers of space biologists and students everywhere. Ad astra.

"Women Have Always Been NASA Pioneers", Dava Newman and Ellen Stofan

"... One of those pioneers, Dr. Thora Halstead, passed away last week. Thora was a mentor to many, and her work benefited thousands. She's been credited with helping to establish the field of space biology before there was such a discipline, and the mentors of many of today's scientists working in the field can credit Thora with direct mentorship or inspiration. Thora's numerous experiments and more than 40 published papers explored how the cells of living organisms respond to a low-gravity environment. As we move closer to Mars, we see that work in many ways, from the VEGGIE experiment that has produced the first lettuce crop in space, or research to show us how plants communicate within their systems in microgravity. Thora also founded the American Society for Gravitational and Space Biology (ASGSB), a 500-plus member society with worldwide scientific community membership (now the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research). The legacy of exchange and collaboration that she began will continue to advance space biology for years to come."

John Newcomb

NASA Langley Engineer and Author John Newcomb Dies

"An engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center during the critical Apollo years and those that successfully landed Viking on Mars, John Foster Newcomb passed away March 10, 2016. In the early heady days of space exploration, Newcomb worked on the Lunar Orbiter Project which placed five Lunar Orbiters around the moon, a mission critical to the success of the Apollo Project. The Lunar Orbiters photographed and mapped the moon, giving researchers insight into the best potential landing sites for the crewed Apollo missions."

Keith's note: John Newcomb and I recently exchanged voicemails about his book but never managed to talk. I wanted to talk to him about his Lunar Orbiter experiences. He spoke at NASA HQ just last week - but NASA does not tell people about these events. Now he is gone. Dammit. I'm glad he was able to write this book and speak to people about it such that we know what it was like to do crazy things that no one has ever done before.

Kavandi Named Glenn Research Center Director, Free Joins Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

"NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has named former astronaut Janet Kavandi director of the agency's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. Kavandi has been serving as Glenn's deputy director since February 2015. She succeeds Jim Free, who was named deputy associate administrator for technical in the agency's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate in Washington. The appointments are effective Monday."

Don Williams

Association of Space Explorers: "We are very sad to pass along the news that former astronaut Don Williams has passed away. Fair skies and following seas, Cap'n."

NASA astronaut bio

"Born February 13, 1942, in Lafayette, Indiana. Died on February 23, 2016. He is survived by his wife and two children. He enjoyed all sports activities and his interests included running and photography."





Edgar Mitchell

Astronaut Mitchell Dies Exactly 45 Years After His Moon Walk

"Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell died yesterday. Coincidentally, on 5 Feb. 1971, Mitchell, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, stands by the deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface during the early moments of the first extravehicular activity of the mission."

Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, 85, dies in West Palm Beach , Palm Beach Post

"Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, who was part of the Apollo 14 space crew that flew to the moon in 1971, died late Thursday in West Palm Beach, according to his family. Mitchell, 85, lived in suburban Lake Worth and died at a local hospice at about 10 p.m. Thursday, his daughter, former West Palm Beach City Commissioner Kimberly Mitchell told The Palm Beach Post."

NASA Administrator Remembers Apollo-Era Astronaut Edgar Mitchell

"He believed in exploration, having been drawn to NASA by President Kennedy's call to send humans to the moon. He is one of the pioneers in space exploration on whose shoulders we now stand."

Todd May Named Marshall Space Flight Center Director

"NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has named Todd May director of the agency's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. May was appointed Marshall deputy director in August 2015 and has been serving as acting director since the Nov. 13, 2015 retirement of Patrick Scheuermann. As director, May will lead one of NASA's largest field installations, with almost 6,000 civil service and contractor employees, an annual budget of approximately $2.5 billion and a broad spectrum of human spaceflight, science and technology development missions."

RD Promotion Process Survey (Jan 2016), LaRC Survey at Surveymonkey

"The RD Promotion Process Team is evaluating the efficiency and transparency of the promotion process for AST's and technicians in RD. The top-level goals of this team are to evaluate and recommend improvements to the RD promotion process that will improve the efficiency and transparency of these processes for all AST's and technicians in RD."

Keith's 1 Feb update: The survey has suddenly closed. Oops.

OPM Status

"Applies to: Applies to: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 FEDERAL OFFICES in the Washington, DC area are CLOSED. Emergency and telework-ready employees required to work must follow their agency's policies, including written telework agreements."

Snow Covered Washington DC Metro Area Seen From Space

"The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this natural-color image of Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. on January 24, 2016."

NASA Administrator Communicates Harassment Policies to Grantees (link fixed)

"The following is a letter from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden to grantee institutions running NASA-funded programs regarding harassment policies: As a leader in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA endeavors to make our collaborations with our grant recipient institutions as productive and successful as possible in all facets of our shared objectives. This means that we seek not only the most innovative and cutting-edge scientific and technological research from our grant recipients, we also expect strong efforts to create and sustain welcoming and inclusive educational environments. We view such efforts not as "something nice to do" if the time can be spared, or something that human resources or the diversity and equity offices are responsible for, but rather as an integral and indeed necessary aspect of all educational program environments. Let me be perfectly clear: NASA does not tolerate sexual harassment, and nor should any organization seriously committed to workplace equality, diversity and inclusion. Science is for everyone and any behavior that demeans or discourages people from fully participating is unacceptable."

Dava Newman: NASA Communicates Harassment Policies to Grantees

Keith's 15 Jan 5:00 pm note: Kudos to Charlie Bolden for making a very public and unequivocal stance on this issue. No one will ever doubt NASA's stance on this issue. In fact Bolden may have just set a new, higher standard in this regard.

Keith's 15 Jan 1:35 pm note: The issue of sexual harassment in space science and astronomy has taken on a life of its own in traditional and social media. The hashtag #astroSH for these discussions has been trending nationally on Twitter. This has attracted a number of women who have opened up about experiences they had to endure while trying to pursue a career - thus inspiring others to comment as well.

As with anything that gets popular in social media there are now fake Twitter accounts popping up behind which people hide and snipe on #astroSH conversations. Other fake accounts use the hashtag as part of so-called spambot marketing schemes. Yet the core focus of #astroSH continues to grow. And of course #astroSH is a subset of much larger issue of harassment in research and the workplace.

NASA funds a substantial portion of the astronomy and space science research that forms the core of this community's activity. While these specific harassment cases are indeed internal issues within specific non-NASA institutions, NASA does have an unequivocal moral stake in the way that these cases are handled - as well as pushing to make such behavior unwelcome in the first place. Yes, NASA like all other government agencies has a list of formal policies on this matter. However having these policies does not seem to have stifled this behavior. But NASA does have people at its helm - specifically NASA Administrator Bolden, Deputy Administrator Newman, and Chief Scientist Stofan, who could use their prominence to speak out on this issue. So far we've heard nothing but silence. One would hope that will change soon.

Caltech suspends professor for harassment, Science

"For what is believed to be the first time in its history, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena has suspended a faculty member for gender-based harassment. The researcher has been stripped of his university salary and barred from campus for 1 year, is undergoing personalized coaching to become a better mentor, and will need to prove that he has been rehabilitated before he can resume advising students without supervision. Caltech has not curtailed his research activities. The university has not disclosed the name of the faculty member, but Science has learned that it is Christian Ott, a professor of theoretical astrophysics who studies gravitational waves and other signals from some of the most violent events in the cosmos."

Memo from Caltech leadership Regarding Faculty Harassment/Discrimination Issues, Caltech

Congresswoman reveals prominent astronomy professor's history of sexual harassment, Mashable

"A U.S. congresswoman is calling out a leading astronomy educator who violated the sexual harassment policy at the University of Arizona, saying the case highlights a larger problem of holding known offenders accountable in higher education."

Astronomy roiled again by sexual-harassment allegations, Nature

"The new revelations confirm that harassment is a widespread problem in science with only some of the instances now coming to light, says Joan Schmelz, an astronomer at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and longtime advocate for women in astronomy. "You can't just sweep this stuff under the rug, declare it confidential and hope that no one ever knows about it," she says."

What astronomy can do about sexual harassment, Meg Urry/AAS, CNN

"Last week, at its annual winter conference, the American Astronomical Society held a well-attended plenary session to address harassment and next steps. To an outsider, the many articles about the incident might make astronomy seem like a bad place for women. But having worked in physics and astronomy for some 40 years, I see this bad news about astronomy as really good news."

- Stopping Sexual Harassment In The Space Science Community (Update), earlier post
- Dealing With Harassment at American Astronomical Society, earlier post
- Harassment Hypocrisy from the AAS Membership, earlier post

Fred Durant, George Mueller, and Bob Farquhar Honored at The Smithsonian

"There are three displays presently located in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC honoring Fred Durant, George Mueller, and Bob Farquhar who left our planet in 2015. Ad Astra."

NASA Statements on Katherine Johnson's Medal of Freedom, NASA

"Katherine Johnson once remarked that even though she grew up in the height of segregation, she didn't think much about it because 'I didn't have time for that don't have a feeling of inferiority. Never had. I'm as good as anybody, but no better.' "The truth in fact, is that Katherine is indeed better. She's one of the greatest minds ever to grace our agency or our country, and because of the trail she blazed, young Americans like my granddaughters can pursue their own dreams without a feeling of inferiority."

Katherine Johnson: The Girl Who Loved to Count, NASA

"In 1953, after years as a teacher and later as a stay-at-home mom, she began working for NASA's predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA. The NACA had taken the unusual step of hiring women for the tedious and precise work of measuring and calculating the results of wind tunnel tests in 1935. In a time before the electronic computers we know today, these women had the job title of "computer." During World War II, the NACA expanded this effort to include African-American women."

NASA: Cabana played role in illegal hires at KSC, Florida Today

"Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana and other senior leaders were more involved than previously disclosed in illegal spaceport hires that may still be subject to federal investigation, according to records FLORIDA TODAY obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. Auditors found the hires of three administrative assistants supporting Cabana and two other high-ranking officials on the fourth floor of KSC headquarters suggested a deliberate effort to get around federal laws requiring competition and priority consideration for certain military veterans. "OPM's report also identified three illegal appointments in the Director's Office that I believed may have resulted from a willful intent to violate veterans' preference laws or to circumvent fair and open competition," NASA Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot wrote last year in a "Letter of Counseling" to Cabana, referring to the results of a 2013 audit by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. NASA records show Cabana identified and lobbied for three people who became known internally as the "primes," or prime candidates, to fill openings as his executive assistant and Deputy Director Janet Petro's secretary in mid-2012."

Keith's note: I have to say that this article is an impressive piece of work by James Dean. Based on his good work, it would seem that this sort of flawed management behavior is totally acceptable at KSC - starting at the top. Remember the whole Ed Mango saga? You can be convicted of a job-related felony and still keep your job at KSC. So ... why is any of this other behavior surprising?

- Mango Pleads Guilty to a Job-Related Felony - Still Has a NASA Job, earlier posts
- Update: Former NASA Commercial Crew Director Mango Pleads Guilty to Federal Felony, earlier posts

Have a look at this 3 Nov 2015 internal KSC email - not only can you keep your job at KSC after pleading guilty to a felony, you get promoted.

Subject: GFAST Lead

All, As most are aware Kathy Milon has accepted a position on a Source Board and will be leaving her position in C3 soon. I first want to express a heartfelt thanks to her for her dedication and commitment to the success of GFAST and the C3 Project; truly a great job in getting us as far as we've come. So thank-you Kathy! Ed Mango has accepted the challenge to lead the GFAS Team, with the transition to commence immediately. I know everyone will support Ed in this new assignment and we're fortunate to have someone of his experience ready to step in. This assignment will be for what's likely to be for a few months as we identify a long-term solution and phase that person in over time. Please join me in thanking Kathy and wishing her well, and welcoming Ed into his new role! Please pass this info on to your teams or forward as appropriate.

Bob Willcox

Todd May Named Marshall Space Flight Center Acting Director

"NASA has named Todd May acting director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, as the agency continues the process of looking for a permanent director. Patrick Scheuermann, who served as the Marshall director since September 2012, is retiring from the agency, effective Friday. His retirement caps a 27-year career with NASA that began in 1988 as a propulsion test engineer at the agency's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi."

Victor Hurst

Astronaut plays bagpipes on International Space Station, (video) BBC

"Kjell Lindgren played Amazing Grace on the pipes after recording a message about research scientist Victor Hurst, who was involved in astronaut training. ... In a video recorded in the last few days, Mr Lindgren said all of them had come into contact with Dr Hurst during their training and were "shocked and saddened" to hear about his death. Dr Hurst worked for US engineering company Wyle Science as a research scientist and instructor. He died suddenly in October, aged 48. Nasa flight engineer Mr Lindgren said: "He always had a quick smile, a kind word. I don't know if anyone was more enthusiastic and professional about being involved in human space flight."

Charles Elachi to retire as JPL Director, NASA

"Charles Elachi, the director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory since 2001, announced today he is retiring at the end of June 2016. He will become professor emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, where he currently serves as a vice president and professor of Electrical Engineering and Planetary Science. Elachi began his career at JPL in 1970."

Bob Farquhar (Update)

In Memory of Robert Farquhar, the Original Space Hacker, Motherboard

"Bob was laid to rest the other day after 83 orbits around the sun. Bob liked to tinker with things - especially spacecraft and their orbits. Let me change that. Bob was a hacker. Since he actually was the smartest guy in the room, he always had the numbers on his side. And he was persistent - sometimes waiting months, years, or even decades to get something to happen the way he envisioned it."

Stan Schmidt

Stanley Schmidt Former Ames Aerospace Engineer Dies

"In 1959, even before President Kennedy had announced that we choose to go to the Moon, Stanley F. Schmidt was developing a midcourse navigation system needed for a space capsule on a circumlunar voyage. Stan then was chief of the dynamics analysis branch at NASA Ames when his former boss, Harry Goett, challenged him to do pioneering research in advance of the Apollo mission. High-speed computer processing was in its infancy, and processing vast amounts of data in real time accurately enough to direct a spacecraft to and from the Moon was a daunting challenge."

Marshall Space Flight Center director announces retirement in email today, Huntsville Times

"NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Director Patrick Scheuermann announced to center staff today that he will retire on Nov. 13. In his email to the Marshall team, Scheuermann did not say what he will do next, but that he and his family will remain in the Tennessee Valley. He has been director of Marshall since 2012. There was also no immediate word on Scheuermann's successor. The center recently announced that Todd May, formerly head of the Space Launch System (SLS) program, would become deputy director. May replaced Teresa Vanhooser, who also retired earlier this year as deputy director."

Bob Farquhar

Keith's note: My friend Robert Farquhar left this life today. He orbited the sun 83 times. He was big on orbits and designed some of the most esoteric and complex spacecraft trajectories ever attempted which were executed with stunning precision. Between ISEE-3's crazy trips around the inner solar system to the recent flyby of Pluto, Bob had a hand in many missions.

The ISEE-3 Reboot effort during which I got to know Bob very well - was spawned by Bob's relentless persistence and was the capstone to a career that spanned decades and saw into the future with immense precision. He was a hacker in his 80s and simply stunned some of the younger folks who worked on our team.

Bob was a steely-eyed missile man and a genuine space cowboy who always knew exactly how to get NASA to do what it needed to do - even if NASA did not know it at the time. Bob taught me that you are never too old to try new things and that being a pain in the ass serves a vital role in the exploration of space.

I went to visit Bob a week or so ago at home. He was weak but still smiled when I reminded him that he and I had agreed to go outside and wave at ISEE-3 when it flies by Earth again in 2029. More to follow in the days ahead.

George Mueller

George Mueller, NASA engineer who helped enable moon landing, dies at 97, Washington Post (Extensive obituary)

"George Mueller, a coolly decisive, hard-driving engineer, scientist and administrator who was given much of the credit for enabling NASA to meet President John F. Kennedy's manned moon landing timetable, as well as for initiating the Skylab and space shuttle programs, died Oct. 12 at his home in Irvine, Calif. He was 97."

Remembering George Mueller, Leader of Early Human Spaceflight, NASA

Berkeley astronomer in sexual harassment case to resign, Nature

"Astronomer Geoffrey Marcy is stepping down as a faculty member at the University of California, Berkeley, following revelations that a university investigation found he had sexually harassed multiple students between 2001 and 2010. ... Marcy has also resigned as principal investigator of the Breakthrough Listen project, a US$100 million initiative announced in July to search for signs of intelligent life in the Universe."

Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies Announces Appointment of Michael Suffredini as President, Commercial Space Division

"Michael T. Suffredini will lead the Commercial Space Division, a new enterprise for SGT. The Commercial Space Division will focus SGT's and its affiliated companies', spaceflight engineering, operations and hardware development capabilities on space related commercial opportunities. Through private and public/private partnerships the division expects to play a significant role in the development of low Earth orbit capabilities to support and foster the growing economy and commercialization of space. Dr. Kam Ghaffarian, the CEO and President of SGT stated "Mike's experience and accomplishments are the perfect match for our Commercial Space Division and he will build a new future for SGT as we embark on the commercialization of space."

James McLane

James Calvin McLane III

"James Calvin McLane III, an engineer, author, caver, collector, space technology expert, motorcyclist, photographer, Lutheran, adventurer, and friend, died in his home of a heart attack on Tuesday, September 22, 2015. He was 70 years old. In between traveling the world working in oil and gas, he had a distinguished career working in the footsteps of his father for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)."

Hinners Point Above Floor of Marathon Valley on Mars

"The summit takes its informal name as a tribute to Noel Hinners (1935-2014). For NASA's Apollo program, Hinners played important roles in selection of landing sites on the moon and scientific training of astronauts. He then served as NASA associate administrator for space science, director of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA chief scientist and associate deputy administrator of NASA. Subsequent to responsibility for the Viking Mars missions while at NASA, he spent the latter part of his career as vice president for flight systems at Lockheed Martin, where he had responsibility for the company's roles in development and operation of NASA's Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, Phoenix Mars Lander, Stardust and Genesis missions."

Noel Hinners, earlier post

"He did everything you could do in and around NASA once," Cowing said."

Keith's note: Noel would be totally humbled to learn of this.

Keith's 11 Aug update: Sources report that the person (referenced below) who was told that they could not attend the JPL Planetary Science Summer School has now been told by NASA HQ that they can attend after all.

Keith's 7 Aug 10:11 am note: The following is posted in a Closed Facebook page "Young Scientists for Planetary Exploration". The group has 1,549 members. I was made aware of this issue last night in great detail before I asked to join the group. When my membership was approved just now I was confronted with a warning that I would be banned for life if I posted anything from this group. I was not aware of this restriction when I asked to join - only after the fact. This is an important issue that needs to be surfaced. I will not identify the individual who posted this. I expect to be banned momentarily. Oh well.

Keith's 7 Aug 8:11 pm note: I have been kicked out of the group (one would assume) for raising this issue. You're welcome. What is really odd is that Andy Rivkin, one of the people who run this Facebook group, violates their own rules with regard to publicly discussing content from within the group.

"I've been participating in this year's JPL Planetary Science Summer School for the past 9 weeks, and was told only today that I have been declined further participation in the program, and will be withdrawn from next week's session at JPL. The reason I was given was that my place of birth was in Hong Kong, regardless of the fact that my citizenship is Canadian. NASA regards all persons born in Hong Kong as Chinese Nationals, including those like myself who were born prior to the 1997 handover, were never granted Chinese citizenship, and have immigrated to other countries like Canada. After contacting some people to try to understand why I was informed of this so late, it has come to my attention that this is a NASA-wide issue (not just JPL or PSSS) that was enacted just today by the NASA HQ Security Branch."

- Hong Kong Policy Act Report, State Department
- Designated Countries List, NASA HQ Security

Claudia Alexander

Claudia Alexander

"The passing of Claudia Alexander reminds us of how fragile we are as humans but also as scientists how lucky we are to be part of planetary science. She and I constantly talked about Comets. Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in particular. She was an absolute delight to be with and always had a huge engaging smile when I saw her. It was easy to see that she loved what she was doing. We lost a fantastic colleague and great friend. I will miss her." - Dr. James Green, Director of NASA's Planetary Science Division

The Claudia J. Alexander foundation for scholarships for STEM students

NASA Names New Director for Langley Research Center

"NASA has announced that Dr. David E. Bowles has been named director of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, succeeding Stephen G. Jurczyk who served in that capacity from April 2014. Bowles has been serving as the acting center director since March of this year when Jurczyk was temporarily assigned to NASA Headquarters as the acting Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate. Jurczyk has since been named associate administrator."

Jack King

NASA Mourns Loss of Former Launch Commentator Jack King

"John W. (Jack) King, former chief of Public Information at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, died June 11, 2015. He was 84. A resident of Cocoa Beach, Florida, King worked in the space agency's Public Affairs office from 1960 until 1975. He returned to Kennedy in 1997, working for space shuttle contractor United Space Alliance until his 2010 retirement. According to Hugh Harris, retired director of NASA Public Affairs at Kennedy, King was instrumental in instituting open communications with the public during the beginning of America's civilian space program."

KSC Employee Update: Photo Opportunity Thursday for The Martian Movie

"By special request from the film producers of the upcoming major motion picture "The Martian," NASA and Kennedy Space Center employees have been invited to participate in a group photo session on Thursday, June 11, at 7:30 a.m. This opportunity will take place at the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden and should last no longer than one hour. The first 200 people to show up will be included in the photo. Be advised that the photo will be altered so that 10-15 faces will be superimposed by actual cast members from the movie."

Keith's note: It is rather odd for NASA KSC to invite people to a photo shoot with movie stars who will not be there and then be told that 10-15 of the people who show up will be replaced by the movie stars - who are not there. And then the photo will presumably be used to show how people who never actually met the movie star worked with those movie stars.

Dale Meyers

NASA Legend Dale Myers Dies at 93; Helped Save Apollo 13, Times of San Diego

"Dale Myers, a famed NASA administrator who helped save the ill-fated Apollo 13 mission and resurrect the space shuttle program after the 1986 Challenger disaster, has died at his retirement home in La Costa. Myers was 93 when he died May 19 at La Costa Glen, his home for 10 years. But he had lived intermittently in Leucadia since 1962, where he had a vacation home, said Janet Westling of San Marcos, one of his two daughters. "He loved being independent," Westling told Times of San Diego. "He didn't stop driving, and was very happy and alive to the day he died. Friends of his say, 'We all want to go that way.'"

Dale Dehaven Myers

Jim Rose

James Turner Rose

"James Turner Rose, 1935-2015, known throughout the space community to have been an early pioneer of space as a place for commercial pursuits, Jim Rose was among the first to develop a business proposition that involved capturing the advantages of microgravity. He created Electrophoresis Operations In Space (EOS), the first joint endeavor agreement between industry and NASA to bring space commercialization into reality."

Marjorie Townsend

Marjorie Townsend, who managed a U.S. spacecraft launch, dies at 85, Washington Post

"In 1959, Mrs. Townsend became one of the first female engineers to join the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In the next decade, she became the first female spacecraft project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. From the mid-1960s to 1975, she managed the agency's small astronomy satellite program, where she was responsible for the design, construction, testing and orbital operations of NASA's first astronomical spacecraft."

Oscar Carl Holderer

Oscar Carl Holderer

"Nov. 4, 1919 - May 5, 2015 -- Mr. Holderer was born in Preum, Germany. He was the last surviving member of Wernher von Braun's original team of 120 engineers and scientists coming from Germany as part of Operation Paperclip in 1945."

Keith's note: Eugene Tu will be named today as the new Center Director at NASA Ames Research Center. Tu will replace Pete Worden who retired from the position last month. Tu is currently the Director of Exploration Technology at NASA ARC and has held this position since November 2005.

Eugene L. Tu

Dava Newman confirmed as NASA deputy, MIT

"According to NASA, the deputy administrator "provides overall leadership, planning, and policy direction." Her duties will include leading NASA governmental affairs; oversight of the agency's offices, communications, and educational programs; and serving as the NASA representative to the multinational partnership that manages the International Space Station."

NASA Procedural Requirements NPD 1000.3D, NASA

"4.1.2.2 The Deputy Administrator is responsible to the Administrator for providing overall leadership, planning, and policy direction for the Agency. The Deputy Administrator performs the duties and exercises the powers delegated by the Administrator, assists the Administrator in making final Agency decisions, and acts for the Administrator in his or her absence by performing all necessary functions to govern NASA operations and exercise the powers vested in the Agency by law. The Deputy Administrator articulates the Agency's vision and represents NASA to the Executive Office of the President, Congress, heads of Federal and other appropriate Government agencies, international organizations, and external organizations and communities."

Worden Beams Up

A Space Maverick Quietly Departs NASA, editorial, Space News

"Outspoken, with a palpable disdain for management bureaucracy, Mr. Worden was an enthusiastic advocate of small satellites and other innovations like single-stage-to-orbit rocket technology during a 29-year career in the U.S. Air Force. More hawkish than most dared to be on the touchy subject of space warfare, Mr. Worden in 1993 led Clementine, a low-cost robotic mission to the moon that he later characterized as a "sneaky space weapon test." Somewhat counterintuitively given his warrior reputation, Mr. Worden also was recognized as a bona fide intellectual, holder of a doctorate in astronomy and author or co-author of more than 150 scientific and technical papers including one in which he branded NASA a "self-licking ice cream cone."

Keith's note: Odd that Space News overtly mentions Pete Worden's doctorate and then refer to him as "Mr." a dozen times. When I inquired Space News told me that no one is called "Dr." in their publication. Oh well. Otherwise, its a nice overview of Dr. Worden's tenure at NASA.

Ames Has A Stargate, earlier post

Bill Walker

William "Bill" H. Walker, 86

"Bill left ARAMCO to join Wernher Von Braun's team of scientists and engineers in NASA in Huntsville, Ala. The team was then working on the design of the Saturn V rocket. While with NASA, Bill continued his education at the University of Alabama, eventually earning masters and doctoral degrees in math and engineering. Bill's career at NASA saw him involved with all Saturn V launches, the Apollo moon missions, Hubble Space Telescope and the AstroLab array of X-ray telescopes that flew aboard the Space Shuttle on three different missions. Bill also served as a member of one of three, four-man teams that managed to keep the crippled Skylab in orbit until it was allowed to fall safely to earth. At the time of his retirement from NASA, Bill was working on the design of the navigation system for the X33 Space Craft, which was to have been the replacement for the Space Shuttle."

Bernice Steadman

Bernice Steadman, part of NASA's 'Mercury 13' dies, AP

"A woman who was among 13 selected for training as possible astronauts in the early 1960s has died at her northern Michigan home. She was 89. Bernice Steadman was a member of the so-called "Mercury 13." NASA dropped the program, and it was 22 more years before a U.S. woman went to space."

Seaton Norman

Seaton B. Norman

"February 5, 1918 ~ March 19, 2015 (age 97)"

Goddard Legend Retires at 92 (page 12)

"How many colleagues do you know who retired at 92 with 70+ years at Government service? Seaton Norman, Telecommunications Manager for Code 761 retired from Goddard on September 3, 2010. He has served 30 years in the U.S. Air Force, and 40-plus years in communications at NASA. During his career at NASA, he has received the Goddard Award of Merit, the NASA Exceptional Service award, the Silver Snoopy Award, and received the NASA Space Flight Awareness Award for his many years of support for the Shuttle program."

Where is Dava Newman?

Keith's note: Dava Newman was chosen as the nominee for NASA Deputy Administrator 5 months ago in October 2014. We have heard nothing since then. Dava Newman has yet to testify before the Senate (and get their approval) so it is unclear when she will be formally confirmed. With impending food fights in the Republican-led Congress, such routine things as nominations may be stalled - or (worse) may become opportunities to score partisan points against the Administration - with the nominee taking the brunt of the negative energy.

Meanwhile, Charlie Bolden has been telling senior NASA staff that he intends to be doing
"a lot of traveling in my final two years". Stay Tuned.

Keith's update: Word has it that Dava Newman will be present with Charlie Bolden at the Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Thursday.

Curt Michel

Professor Emeritus Curt Michel Dies

"F. Curtis (Curt) Michel, the Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor Emeritus of Space Physics and Astronomy, died Feb. 23 at the age of 80. Although he retired in 2000 after 37 years at Rice, Michel continued to keep an office on campus, where he pursued his studies of solar winds, radio pulsars and numerical methods. He was part of the fourth class of astronauts chosen by NASA in 1965 as the agency ramped up the Apollo moon program. He was one of six scientist-astronauts in the class, the first on a roster that until that point had been largely limited to test pilots."

Curt Michel, Wikipedia

Norm Carlson

Pete Worden is Leaving NASA

Keith's note: NASA Ames Research Center Director Pete Worden will announce this afternoon that he is leaving NASA at the end of March.

Keith's update: NASA ARC Memo: All Hands Meeting: Pete Worden is Leaving NASA

"On Wednesday, Feb. 25, I informed NASA Administrator Bolden that I have decided to retire from federal service and pursue some long-held dreams in the private sector."

Worden Announces Retirement as NASA Ames Center Director

"Earlier today, Pete Worden notified me of his decision to retire as Director of NASA's Ames Research Center. After more than four decades of dedicated public service, Pete said it was time to pursue other opportunities. He is an innovative leader, and a tireless advocate for change who has well-positioned Ames and its people for the future exploration opportunities facing this agency."

Sonja Alexander Maclin

Keith's note: Sonja Alexander Maclin has passed away.

Service arrangements below.

Sonja was always the nicest person I talked to at NASA Headquarters - on any topic.

Steve Jurczyk Named Head of NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate

"NASA Administrator Charles Bolden has named Steve Jurczyk as the agency's Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate, effective Monday, March 2. The directorate is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use on future NASA missions. Jurczyk has served as Center Director at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, since April of 2014."

Fitz Fulton

Fitzhugh 'Fitz' Fulton, revered military and NASA test pilot, dies at 89

"Pilot Fitzhugh "Fitz" Fulton Jr., known as the "Dean of Flight Test" for his involvement in pioneering programs including the space shuttle piggyback flights, died Wednesday at home in Thousand Oaks. He was 89.The cause was complications of Parkinson's disease, said his daughter, Ginger Terry. His four-decade career included flying for the military, NASA and Scaled Composites, headed by aviation pioneer Burt Rutan in Mojave."

Fitzhugh L. Fulton

Valorie Burr

Valorie Burr (NASA GSFC)

"Valorie A. Burr, 61, a resident of Odenton, MD, passed away at her home on January 21, 2015."

Remembrance

NASA Administrator Message: Day of Remembrance - Jan. 28, 2015

"Today we remember and give thanks for the lives and contributions of those who gave all trying to push the boundaries of human achievement. On this solemn occasion, we pause in our normal routines and remember the STS-107 Columbia crew; the STS-51L Challenger crew; the Apollo 1 crew; Mike Adams, the first in-flight fatality of the space program as he piloted the X-15 No. 3 on a research flight; and those lost in test flights and aeronautics research throughout our history."

Denise Stewart

Keith's note: Denise J. Stewart has passed away. She worked at NASA Headquarters for a number of years.

Update: Memorial details are below:

Ball Aerospace Names Michael Gazarik as Technology Director

"Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. has hired Michael Gazarik as Director for its Office of Technology on the Boulder campus effective March 2. Dr. Gazarik will lead the alignment of Ball's technology development resources with business development and growth strategies."

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden Statement: "Mike's experienced leadership and commitment has been critical to building the strong foundation upon which our Space Technology Mission Directorate now stands," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "Through his hard work and vision, he's developed an innovative, cross-cutting organization that creates the new knowledge and capabilities needed to enable our future missions. Mike's proven that technology drives exploration and is a critical component of our journey to Mars. His tireless work and dedication to fostering innovation at NASA will be sorely missed."

NASA Associate Administrator for Space Technology Michael Gazarik Statement: "It's been a great honor to lead a team that has, for the first time in more than a decade, created a robust, relevant and innovative space technology program at NASA. As my family and I embark on a new chapter in our lives and I accept an aerospace industry position, I depart knowing that the NASA team is well on its way to achieving important space technology milestones that will enable our journey to Mars and beyond."

Alberto Enrique Behar

Longtime JPL scientist killed in plane crash near Van Nuys Airport, Daily News

"Alberto Enrique Behar, 47, of Scottdale, Arizona, died at the scene of the crash, Los Angeles County Department of Coroner Lt. R. Hays said. Behar was the only person on board the aircraft. According to his online resume on LinkedIn.com, Behar had worked as an investigation scientist at JPL in Pasadena since 1991, where he worked on robotics systems for planetary exploration."

Explorers dive under Greenland ice, BBC (2008)

"Dr Behar is a robotics expert with the agency at its Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, US. He has been studying the tubular crevasses that appear on the surface of the Greenland ice known as moulins."

The NASA family lost 5 of its members over the holidays.

James Hsiu-Kai Chi
Larry Vogel
Sam Keller
Thomas McMurtry
Owen Glenn Morris

Ad astra.

Owen Glenn Morris

Owen Glenn Morris

"Owen Glenn was hired by NACA in Langley, Virginia to design and operate a supersonic wind tunnel. In 1958, NACA became NASA and Owen Glenn joined the Space Task Group, focusing on the Apollo Program. Owen Glenn was a pioneer throughout his life using his positive "can do, will do" attitude to work with others on many programs and causes bringing dreams to reality."

Owen Glenn, NASA Johnson Space Center Oral History Project

Thomas McMurtry

Keith's note Thomas C. McMurtry passed away at 6:40 AM, Saturday, January 3, 2015.
Funeral services will be held Saturday, January 10th at 12:30 at Father Serra Parish in Quartz Hill. Viewing will be Friday, January 9th at Halley Olsen Mortuary in Lancaster between 4-8pm. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Carmelite Sisters of Alhambra (http://www.carmelitesistersocd.com/gifts-in-memoriam/) or Father Serra Parish in Lancaster, CA.

NASA Dryden Biographies, Former Pilots: Thomas C. McMurtry

"Thomas C. McMurtry brought a distinguished career as a research pilot and administrator to a close on June 3, 1999, when he retired from NASA's Dryden (now Armstrong) Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, after 32 years of service. Most recently, McMurtry was Associate Director for Operations at NASA Dryden from July 27, 1998, and also served as Dryden's acting Chief Engineer from February, 1999 until his retirement."

James Hsiu-Kai Chi

James Hsiu-Kai Chi

"Suddenly on Friday, December 26, 2014, James Hsiu-Kai Chi died at his home in Gaithersburg, MD."

According to a NASA employee who knew him "James, a highly respected and talented senior information technology specialist, served as a key graphic designer for the NASA family for many years."

Sam Keller

keller.jpgSamuel W. Keller

"On December 14, 2014.... Memorial service will be held on Saturday, January 3, 2015"

Associate Administrator for Russian Programs Appointed (1992)

"NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin today announced the appointment of Samuel W. Keller as Associate Administrator for Russian Programs. The new function is being established within the Office of the Administrator and will give focus to the many programs involving NASA and the former Soviet Union."

Larry Vogel

vogel.jpgLawrence W. Vogel

"Lawrence W. Vogel (age 94) passed away after a brief illness on December 18, 2014. For 12 years, Col. Vogel served as Director of NASA Headquarters Administration and was proud to be a part of NASA's very successful manned space programs highlighted in the Apollo lunar missions. After retirement from public service in 1986, Col. Vogel remained very active in West Point and NASA retiree activities."

Federal Job Satisfaction Sinks in Latest Survey, Government Executive

"Employee satisfaction and commitment declined to their lowest levels since the 2003 debut of the "Best Places to Work in the Federal Government" report in the edition released Tuesday by the nonprofit Partnership for Public Service and Deloitte Consulting LLP."

Feds unhappy with leaders, new government survey finds, Washington Post

"Employees at NASA, which ranks as the best large place to work in the government, said they value their mission to continue cutting-edge research, technology and space exploration despite the retirement of the high-profile shuttle program. "Everyone here has a lot of pride and knowledge, and they're high-caliber individuals," NASA flight director Mike Sarafin said. "Just being surrounded by people like that drives you to be your best."

2014 Best Places to Work in the Federal Government, Partnership for Public Service

"For the third year in a row, the number one Best Places to Work large agency is NASA with a score of 71.6."

Lewis Peach

Keith's note: Sources report that Lewis Peach has died. Lew was always working on interesting things. Always. Ad astra.

"Lewis Peach died on Nov. 22 at his home in Arnold. He retired from Senior Executive Service at NASA where he served as Project Manager in the Office of Space Flight, and the NASA Academy for program/Project and Engineering Leadership. He was a vice-president for exploration/development at USRA. Lewis began his career at NASA's Ames Research Center. He was a board member of Hawaii's Pisces space program and was a Vietnam veteran."

More arrangement information below

More HSPD-12 Abuses at JPL

A Question of Loyalty, Pasadena Weekly

"Over the past eight months, Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer Cate Heneghan said she has been dealing with what she considers to be an abuse of authority by NASA, which has been trying to force her to sign what amounts to a loyalty oath -- asking intrusive questions about her allegiance to the United States. Heneghan, who was born and raised in Bethesda, Md., studied at New Mexico State and USC and has dual citizenship with Ireland, argues that the questions do not conform to NASA guidelines. "How is it JPL is implementing these questions beyond the adjudicative standard, which is required in HSPD-12?" asked Heneghan, who does concept development design for NASA missions and has been at JPL for 26 years. "No one can answer that question."

Earlier HSPD-12 postings

Caltech professor claims Israeli spy infiltrated JPL, Pasadena Star News

"Sandra Troian alleges Caltech administrators ignored the school's whistleblower policy and retaliated against her for the past four years because if they had documented her concern, they could have put an $8 billion contract with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at risk and put the school in a bad light. Troian said she is frightened for her career. ...

... "In a statement issued late Thursday, Caltech called Troian's lawsuit meritless and said the institution always abides by export control laws and ITAR. It also regularly cooperates with government agencies such as the FBI, the statement said. "The plaintiff, who was dissatisfied with the outcome of a recent internal campus investigation into her decision to list her cat as the author of a published abstract and omit recognition of a postdoctoral scholar who performed related research, suffered no retaliation and remains an active faculty member of the institution," the Caltech statement said."

Sean O'Keefe's New Gigs

Sean O'Keefe Joins CSIS as Distinguished Senior Adviser, Center for Strategic and International Studies

"CSIS has developed a stellar reputation as an important, objective catalyst to shape the public policy debate on a wide range of global security issues," Mr. O'Keefe said. "I am delighted to have the privilege to participate in the debate with the added benefit of drawing on the partnership expertise of my colleagues at the Syracuse University Maxwell School."

Sean O'Keefe Appointed University Professor, Phanstiel Chair, Syracuse University

"O'Keefe has also been named the Howard G. and S. Louise Phanstiel Chair in Strategic Management and Leadership at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs."

Phil Larson Departing OSTP

Keith's note:This email from Phil Larson, Senior Advisor at the Office of Science and Technology Policy, has been making the rounds here in Washington:

"After five extraordinary years, I wanted to let you know that I will be leaving the White House at the end of November. During a week in which the President forged a historic agreement to help combat climate change and continued his fight to maintain a free and open Internet, I couldn't be prouder to have been part of this Administration's science, technology, and innovation efforts. I will be eternally grateful for the opportunity to have served a President so intensely focused on cultivating the roots of American ingenuity and empowering people to change the world for the better. Whether it was helping launch and support a bold new era for NASA, ensuring our students have the tools they need to succeed in a 21st century economy, or lifting up a nation of geeks, I am deeply proud of what we've accomplished together and humbled to have been part of it. I look forward to connecting with each of you personally in the coming days, but let me just say how grateful I am to have worked with the greatest Science Advisor in history and the best OSTP team ever assembled. Still fired up."

ALPA Names Dr. Elizabeth Robinson as Its New Chief Financial Officer

"Today, the Air Line Pilots Association, International (ALPA) announced that Elizabeth Robinson, PhD, will be joining the Association as director of Finance and chief financial officer (CFO) on November 3, 2014. Robinson will lead ALPA's finance team. Robinson comes to ALPA from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where she held the position of CFO since 2009. "Having worked with her in the past, I'm confident in her tremendous ability," said ALPA's general manager Lori Garver. "I look forward to her bringing her expertise and commitment to ALPA."

NASA maintains lofty worker-satisfaction ratings for 2014, Washington Post

"National Aeronautics and Space Administration employees remained largely satisfied with their agency this year, likely continuing the agency's trend of ranking among the best places to work in the federal government, according to results from a recent survey. Seventy-one percent of NASA staffers who responded to the Office of Personnel Management's federal-employee viewpoints survey gave the agency a positive mark this year when asked about their overall impression of the organization. NASA in 2013 earned the highest composite score among all federal agencies for the second consecutive year."

2014 Annual Employee Survey Results, NASA

"These results indicate some challenges to be addressed by senior leaders, particularly around their continuing efforts to be intentional and authentic when communicating big Agency issues with their employees."

NASA OIG: Audit of NASA's Premium Air Travel

"Generally, the 2 years of NASA premium-class travel we reviewed was properly authorized and complied with Federal and Agency travel policy. However, we identified four instances of premium travel that did not fall within any FTR or Agency exceptions, errors and omissions in some travel authorizations, and inaccuracies in NASA's reporting of its premium travel to GSA. In addition, we found the Agency's travel policy did not include several elements required by GSA."

President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts (NASA Excerpt)

"Dr. Dava Newman, Nominee for Deputy Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Dr. Dava Newman is a Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She first joined the MIT faculty in 1993 and has held a number of different faculty positions since then. Dr. Newman is a Harvard-MIT Health, Sciences and Technology faculty member and became a MacVicar Faculty Fellow in 2000. She is also the Director of the MIT Portugal Program, Director of the Technology and Policy Program, and Co-Director of the Man-Vehicle Laboratory at MIT. From 1992 to 1993, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Houston. Dr. Newman received a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame and two S.M.s and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology."

Dava Newman nominated for NASA post, MIT

The deputy administrator's specific duties, Newman says, include NASA's legislative and intergovernmental affairs; communications; the Mission Support Directorate; and international relationships, including the multinational partnership that manages the International Space Station. In addition, the post oversees educational programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics Helping to spur the interest of young people in space, and in engineering in general, will be "a privilege," Newman says. "I'd like to change the conversation with kids about what it means to be an engineer" -- which she calls "the best job in the world, where you get to solve really challenging and extraordinary problems in the service of humankind."

Dava Newman - New Deputy Administrator at NASA, 8 October post

Shana Dale Lands at FAA AST

Shana Dale Joins FAA Commercial Space Office as Deputy AA, Space Policy Online

"Shana Dale will become Deputy Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation (AST) at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as of November 3, 2014. She succeeds George Zamka who left AST this summer to join Bigelow Aerospace. Dale has served in a number of positions on Capitol Hill and in the George W. Bush Administration. She is perhaps best known in space policy circles as the first woman to serve as Deputy Administrator of NASA from 2005-2009 while Mike Griffin was Administrator."

Keith's note: Dava Newman from MIT will be the next Deputy Administrator at NASA - if confirmed.

P.S. She's cool.

- MIT bio
- Dava Newman - Aerospace Engineer/Sailor, PBS
- Shrink-wrapping Spacesuits. MIT

Noel Hinners

Noel Hinners, former NASA scientist, dies at 78, AP

"Keith Cowing, who runs the blog NASA Watch, said Hinners was a reader of his website and would post comments. He called him "one of the last of a certain breed" of NASA scientists from the early days of space exploration programs. "He had one foot firmly placed in the old NASA and one in the new NASA," Cowing said. Hinners worked a variety of positions at NASA, Cowing said. "He did everything you could do in and around NASA once," Cowing said."

Noel Hinners, a top NASA official, dies at 78, Washington Post

"At the Greenbelt facility, he showed his adherence to the doctrine of management by walking around and visiting scientists and others at their jobs. This included working with the maintenance crew on a night when a snowstorm had left Washington roads impassible. Not one to fear getting his feet wet -- or cold -- Dr. Hinners joined in snow plowing operations on the Goddard grounds, and learned, he said, that "there's an art to it."

Steve Nagel

Former NASA Astronaut Steven Nagel Dies

"Former NASA astronaut Steven R. Nagel, who served as a mission specialist on his first space shuttle flight, pilot on his second and commanded his final two, died Aug. 21 after a long illness. He was 67 years old. After retiring from NASA May 31, 2011, he joined the University Of Missouri College of Engineering in Columbia, Missouri. There he served as an instructor in the University's Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department."

Big Union Vote at NASA HQ

300+ Workers at NASA's Washington Headquarters Vote to Form a Union, IFPTE

"This successful vote will allow us to work with management to improve working conditions for NASA support and administrative staff here at NASA headquarters, thereby improving operations, saving money, and retaining an engaged and professional workforce," said Tifarah Thomas, a program specialist within NASA's Office of the Chief Health & Medical Officer. Professional support specialists at NASA headquarters include budget analysts, policy analysts, administrative specialists, secretaries, and others."

Fred Ordway

Frederick I. Ordway III - Obituary

"Through a meeting with his good friend Arthur C. Clarke, the noted science fiction author, Ordway was contacted by film director Stanley Kubrick and spent three years working as Kubrick's technical advisor on the landmark film 2001: A Space Odyssey."

Bill Escher

Bill Escher, AIAA Associate Fellow, and AIAA Member Emeritus, passed away at his Huntsville, Alabama, home on the morning of May 12. Escher was 82. Escher received the 1988 AIAA George M. Low Space Transportation Award for his work on space transportation programs including Vanguard and the Spaceliner programs, and for his work promoting the Synerjet combined-cycle engine concept for low-cost, reliable access to space.

Keith's note: Civil servants working at Wallops have been seeking to decertify their existing union since June 2013 claiming that union representation is no longer necessary at that location. The Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA) has not yet decided if they will conduct a special secret ballot election among those civil servants to decertify the current union, the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE).

The FLRA took the unusual step this week by inviting interested persons to submit Amici Curiae Briefs to them on the legal question of whether the current Federal law under a specific section of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 and the FLRA's regulations apply to decertification petitions filed by individuals. Details of the case before the FLRA are here. A FLRA press release on this topic is here. Federal Register notice is here.

- Brief of the American Federtion of Government Employees AFL-CIO in Response to the Federal Labor Relations Authority Order IN 67 FLRA No. 65
- Brief of Petitioner Ronald H. Walsh

Keith's note: David Chenette has been terminated as Heliophysics Director at NASA SMD. His termination is effective COB 20 June 2014. Chenette has been placed on paid administrative leave until that time. Chenette was escorted out of NASA HQ building last week by security personnel.

NASA SMD Internal Memo: Interim Heliophysics Director

"Dr. Jeffrey Newmark will be interim Director for NASA's Science Mission Directorate Heliophysics Division as of June 6, 2014."

NASA Heliophysics Director Fired

"You have demonstrated little effort to engage your personnel and provide an inclusive workplace that fosters development to their full potential, despite being instructed that this was your primary objective when you were selected for this position," Grunsfeld, said in the notice, adding that the former Lockheed Martin executive had sown "confusion and apprehension in the scientific community."

Frank Spurlock

From his friends: "Late last week, we lost a remarkable unsung hero of the NASA's launch vehicle program. Frank Spurlock was one of the most accomplished and well regarded supervisors here at NASA Glenn (then Lewis) because of his exceptional technical achievements and beyond the call of duty care he took in developing his people. Frank personally derived the amazingly complex variational calculus equations and wrote the 3D computer program which NASA Lewis relied upon to calculate performance and trajectories for Atlas/Centaur and Titan/Centaur launch vehicles for almost 30 years. These trajectory data were then supplied to the launch vehicle contractors to facilitate their trajectory design & enable the steering coefficients to be calculated."

Bill Dana

Aerospace Pioneer William H. Dana Dies

"One of the nation's most respected aerospace pioneers has passed away. Distinguished research pilot and aeronautical engineer William Harvey Dana died on May 6, 2014. His long and illustrious career at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center spanned more than 48 years, during which Dana logged more than 8,000 hours in over 60 different aircraft from helicopters and sailplanes to the hypersonic X-15. Several of the airplanes he flew are displayed at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C."

NASA Senior Leadership Changes

"Administrator Charles Bolden has announced several changes in NASA's senior leadership. Lesa Roe has been named as the agency's Deputy Associate Administrator. Steve Jurczyk will replace Roe as Director of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. Sumara Thompson-King has been named the agency's General Counsel, replacing Michael Wholley, who is retiring."

Michael Meyer Declines NAI Interim Director Position

"Due to unexpected personal conflicts, Dr. Michael Meyer has declined the position of NAI's Interim Director. Dr. Meyer explains, "Unfortunately, the requirements levied to resolve a conflict-of-interest were unacceptable."

Michael Meyer Selected as Interim Director of NASA Astrobiology Institute, earlier post

Keith's note: Dan Dumbacher is leaving NASA In June to take a tenured position at Purdue University in their aerospace engineering department.

John Houbolt

NASA moon landing engineer John C. Houbolt dies at 95, AP

"John C. Houbolt, an engineer whose contributions to the U.S. space program were vital to NASA's successful moon landing in 1969, has died. He was 95. His efforts in the early 1960s are largely credited with convincing NASA to focus on the launch of a module carrying a crew from lunar orbit, rather than a rocket from earth or a space craft while orbiting the planet."

John Houbolt, Wikipedia

Keith's note: This NLRB mandated notice was sent to all employees at Caltech/JPL and just appeared as a huge banner on JPL's internal web page. It states: "The National Labor Relations Board has found that we violated Federal labor law and has ordered us to post and obey this notce."

The hierarchy at JPL for disciplinary actions is: 1. Oral warning 2. Written warning 3. Final written warning 4. Involuntary termination. As such, the wording in this formal NLRB notice this clearly indicates that some pro-union activity got the second level of discipline against these people from JPL management - until the NLRB stomped on Caltech/JPL, that is. Click on image to enlarge for full NLRB notice.

NLRB Rules Against JPL on HSPD-12 Actions, earlier post

"By issuing written warnings to Robert Nelson, Dennis Byrnes, Scott Maxwell, Larry D'Addario, and William Bruce Banerdt because they engaged in protected, concerted activities, the Respondent has engaged in unfair labor practices affecting commerce within the meaning of Section 8(a)(1) and Section 2(6) and (7) of the Act. Having found that the Respondent has engaged in certain unfair labor practices, I shall order it to cease and desist therefrom and to take certain affirmative action designed to effectuate the policies of the Act."

Earlier HSPD-12 posts

Joseph Barksdale

Joseph D. Barksdale, 79, went from cotton fields to NASA, Baltimore Sun

"Joseph D. Barksdale, 79, died March 15 at his home in Laurel. Joseph Decatur Barksdale, who went from the cotton fields of Mississippi where his family was sharecropping to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, where he oversaw the information technology department, died March 15 at his home in Laurel from complications from a fall. He was 79."

Bowden Ward

Mr. Bowden Wilson Ward, Jr., 79, of Seabrook, MD, died Tuesday, March 25, 2014. Retired in 1996 as an Aerospace Engineer from NASA. Mr. Ward's career with Goddard Space Flight Center spanned 33 years and included many projects including OSO, GRO and GOES.

Kelly Carter

Kelly M. Carter, age 57 of Laurel, MD, departed this life at her home in Laurel, MD, surrounded by her family on Friday, March 7, 2014. Kelly was born April 26, 1956 and was the daughter of the late Andrew and Myrna Dargan. She retired from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) after 35 years of extraordinary federal government service.


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