Policy: April 2015 Archives

Keith's note: Two months ago the stealthy, non-transparent Pioneering Space National Summit was held in Washington DC. A few days later an Alliance for Space Development thing was announced. Then the people not involved in these earlier events held their own competing stealthy Humans Orbiting Mars Workshop. All of these events promised that they'd eventually publish or release things to tell the rest of us what they talked about - and what they planned to do with our tax dollars. Tick tock. Nothing but crickets. So ... where is this stuff? Why does anyone pay attention to these organizations?

- Alliance for Space Development: Yawn - Yet Another Space Group, earlier post
- Space Advocates Work Together By Not Working Together, earlier post
- Move Along. This Is Not The Space Policy You're Looking For., earlier post
- Yet Another Plan For Outer Space, earlier post
- Making Space Policy In Secret (Again), earlier post
- Good News Everyone: Another Closed Door Humans to Mars Thing, earlier post
- Stealthy Humans Orbiting Mars Workshop Update, earlier post

Goddard Implementation Plan in Response to the 2014 NASA Strategic Plan

"NASA Headquarters in Washington released the latest version of its strategic plan in 2014. Strategic planning is a dynamic process that is continually taking shape within large agencies, and NASA is no exception. In response to the strategic plan, which presented a significant shift in NASA's expression of its goals and objectives, Goddard leadership recognized the need to update the center's 2004 implementation plan to show how our current work aligns with the agency's latest strategy."

Committee Leaders: Space Exploration Must Be NASA's Priority, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

"Unfortunately, the last six years featured drastic change with the cancellation of Constellation and uncertain direction with the president's ever-changing asteroid initiative. Congress has been consistent in its guidance to NASA that it develop a long-term sustainable exploration strategy that is evolvable and flexible based on an uncertain budget environment."

NASA's Strategic Plan Isn't Strategic - or a Plan, earlier post

"This thing reads like an annual report - there is no "plan" in this strategic plan. The authors are utterly confused as to what a "goal", "objective", and "strategy" are and confusingly use the terms interchangeably. It is almost as if they say "it is important that we do what we are doing because we are already doing it"."

Keith's note: And now GSFC has taken the time to develop a plan to implement this confusing non-strategic non-plan. I can't wait to see how they measure their progress.

NASA Strategic Plan 2014

Public opinion polls and perceptions of US human spaceight, Roger Lanius (2003)

"A belief exists in the United States about public support for NASA's human spaceight activities. Many hold that NASA and the cause of the human exploration of space enjoyed outstanding public support and condence in the 1960s during the era of Apollo and that public support waned in the post- Apollo era, only to sink to quite low depths in the decade of the 1990s. These beliefs are predicated on anecdotal evidence that should not be discounted, but empirical evidence gleaned from public opinion polling data suggests that some of these conceptions are totally incorrect and others are either incomplete or more nuanced than previously believed. This article explores the evolution of public support for space exploration since the 1960s. Using polling data from a variety of sources it presents trends over time and offers comments on the meaning of public perceptions for the evolution of space policy and the development of space exploration in the United States."

Recent Space Poll: The Public is Not Always in Synch With Space Advocates, earlier post

Planetary Society Announces "Humans Orbiting Mars" Workshop Results, Planetary Society

"The goal of the workshop was to gather expert science, engineering, and policy professionals to build consensus on the key elements of a long-term, cost constrained, executable program to send humans to Mars ... As a result of workshop discussions, 70 attendees reached consensus on the following points: ... A full report on the "Humans Orbiting Mars" workshop will be released later in the year."

Keith's note: There will be a post-meeting media briefing this morning with Bill Nye, Scott Hubbard, and John Logsdon. It is doubtful that we'll learn what the remaining 63 participants actually had to say - just what these three want you to think that the participants said. Among the participants were NASA civil servants who were invited - and participated - in an official capacity. Among those listed on the agenda are NASA Advisory Council Chair Steve Squyres and more than half a dozen NASA civil servants including Loren Worley from NASA PAO. Indeed 9/31 people listed on the agenda as speakers work for NASA. All attendees - including the NASA civil servants - agreed in advance never not talk about their participation. This is, of course, in direct contrast to established Obama Administration Open Government and transparency policies when it comes to NASA employees participating in an official capacity. Given that NASA PAO had someone there who is bound not to speak just compounds this matter. In addition, I am told that NASA HQ management saw this event as being advisory in nature which calls into question whether the FACA has been breached.

- Making Space Policy In Secret (Again)
- Good News Everyone: Another Closed Door Humans to Mars Thing, earlier post


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This page is an archive of entries in the Policy category from April 2015.

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