Policy: October 2016 Archives

Blue Planet/Red Planet Politics: Obama's Giant Leap for Legacy, Scientific American

"Yet whether Mars will truly be part of the president's space legacy remains to be seen, says Marcia Smith, founder and editor of SpacePolicyOnline.com. "I think Obama's civil space legacy will be his embrace of commercial partnerships, not humans to Mars," she says. Ultimately Obama's legacy depends in large part on what the next administration does, Smith says. If it continues the Mars exploration program he set up, Obama will likely receive kudos, whether or not it is deserved, she says."

- Obama Takes A Space Policy Victory Lap, earlier post
- That Time Obama Killed A Return To The Moon, earlier post
- President Obama Has Some Ideas About Mars, earlier post

Interplanetary Frontiers, OSTP: Harnessing the Possibilities of Science, Technology, and Innovation

"At the beginning of his Administration, President Obama set out anew vision for space exploration, harking back to the spirit of possibility and exploration that defined the space race of the 1960s, while building upon and advancing 21st century technologies and capabilities. In 2010, the Administration restructured the U.S. civil space program to look forward to bold new goals, not backwards to old ones; to collaborate with, rather than compete with, American entrepreneurs; and to broaden participation and take advantage of new technologies being created at NASA and in America's laboratories."

Barack Obama: America will take the giant leap to Mars, Barack Obama

"This week, we'll convene some of America's leading scientists, engineers, innovators and students in Pittsburgh to dream up ways to build on our progress and find the next frontiers. Just five years ago, US companies were shut out of the global commercial launch market. Today, thanks to groundwork laid by the men and women of NASA, they own more than a third of it. More than 1,000 companies across nearly all 50 states are working on private space initiatives. We have set a clear goal vital to the next chapter of America's story in space: sending humans to Mars by the 2030s and returning them safely to Earth, with the ultimate ambition to one day remain there for an extended time. Getting to Mars will require continued cooperation between government and private innovators, and we're already well on our way. Within the next two years, private companies will for the first time send astronauts to the International Space Station."

Obama, Gov. Wolf to highlight Pittsburgh science and technology conference, Times Online

"President Barack Obama will be in Pittsburgh on Thursday for a daylong conference that will highlight scientific and technological advances locally and nationally. The Frontiers Conference will take place simultaneously at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. The conference will feature some of the biggest names in business, research and governmental agencies. ... The event is not open to the public but can live-streamed at www.frontiersconference.org".

Keith's note: Another meeting that neither regular citizens or news media can attend. The speakers have the benefit of getting to talk to each other while everyone else looks over their shoulders. More closed openness.

Here's why a Clinton administration might pivot NASA back to the Moon, Ars Technica

"Obama killed Constellation after convening a committee in 2009 that was led by Norm Augustine, which reviewed Constellation and other options for US human spaceflight programs. One of that committee's members, former astronaut Leroy Chiao, said Monday night, "The Constellation program, frankly, had a lot of funding problems and some pretty serious technical problems. You know it probably was the right thing to do to cancel it. But it didn't mean we should not go to the Moon." Moreover, Chiao suggested the decision to remove the Moon as a possible destination was driven by politics, rather than what might be best for the US space enterprise. "Frankly, it came down to us on the committee to not talk too much about the Moon, because there was no way this administration was going to go there, because it was W's program," he said. "Ok, that's a pretty stupid reason not to go to the Moon. I'm hopeful with this election cycle that maybe the moon will be a possibility again."


Keith's 4 October update: Elliot Pulham posted a vulgar, sexist rant about Hillary Clinton [Note: NSFW] on Facebook a few months ago. Apparently Elliot read NASAWatch since he just posted this to all of his friends. He clearly does not care what people think. I am trying to imagine how well the Space Foundation is going to get along here in DC if their CEO thinks that saying things like this is acceptable.



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