Russia: June 2021 Archives

Keith's note: Jim Banke just pointed out this transcript of an NBC interview with Putin wherein he talked about space and NASA quite a bit. This is a translation so it is not precise. But it does show the pattern that Russia often uses i.e. 'two steps forward, one step back'. First Rogozin goes on the attack to see how far he can push the U.S - in this case, NASA, and then Putin dials it back by 80% or so. But that still leaves Rogozin 20% to work with. Everyone in the space world is used to this by now.

Something to ponder: despite decades of whiplash from ever-changing U.S./Russian squabbles, the International Space Station has managed to survive and thrive amidst this chaos. Even when both countries engage in tit for tat sanctions - and hurl accusations - the ISS seems to be immune from this. Indeed, there is clearly a tacit acceptance by all parties that the cooperative ventures on ISS are simply too important to disrupt for petty political reasons even when things get really bad back on Earth. Yes, we lean in that direction everyone once in a while, but it is quickly dialed back once people calm down.

As I am fond of saying, perhaps living in space can teach us all some lessons on how to live and work together on Earth. China is about to launch a crew to its new space station. Russia wants to work with them and China wants to work with the U.S. I will be on CGTN at some point today and I will say that exact same thing - as I have many times before.

"VLADIMIR PUTIN: Well, honestly, I don't think that Mr. Rogozin, that is the name of the head of-- Roscosmos, has threatened anyone in this regard. I've known him for many years, and I know that he is a supporter-- he is a supporter of expanding the relationship with the U.S. in this area, in space. Recently, the head of NASA spoke in the same vein. And I personally fully support this. And we have been working with great pleasure all of these years, and we're prepared to continue to work. For technical reasons though, and that's a different matter, is that the International Space Station is-- coming to an end of its service life. And maybe in this-- regard, the Roscosmos does not have plans to continue their work. However-- based on what I heard from-- our U.S. partners they, too, are looking at future cooperation in this particular segment in their certain-- in a certain way. But on the whole, the-- cooperation between our two countries in space is a great example of a situation where despite any kind of problems in political relationships in recent years, it's an area where we have been able to maintain and preserve the partnership and both parties cherish it. I think you just misunderstood the head of the-- Russian space program said. We are interested in continuing to work with the U.S. in this direction, and we will continue to do so if our U.S. partners don't refuse to-- to-- to do that. It doesn't mean that we need to work exclusively with the U.S. We-- have been working and will continue to work with China, which applies to all kinds of programs, including-- exploring deep space. And-- I think there is nothing but --positive information here. I-- frankly, I don't see any ex-- any-- contradictions here. I don't think any mutual-- exclusivity here."

Russia, Once a Space Superpower, Turns to China for Missions, NY Times

"Now, the future of the Russian space program rests with the world's new space power, China. After years of promises and some limited cooperation, Russia and China have begun to draw up ambitious plans for missions that would directly compete with those of the United States and its partners, ushering in a new era of space competition that could be as intense as the first."

Roscosmos chief sees vast prospects for ecological monitoring cooperation with US, TASS

"The CEO of Russia's Roscosmos corporation, Dmitry Rogozin, sees vast prospects for cooperation with the United States in space, in particular, in the field of ecological monitoring. Rogozin shared his ideas while commenting on space-related questions put to Russian President Vladimir Putin in an interview to the US television network NBC. "We see vast prospects for cooperation with the United States in ecological monitoring from space," Rogozin wrote in his Telegram-channel."

Keith's note: Speaking today Rogozin noted that although China's space station is in an orbit with a different inclination than ISS that launches from Russia and French Guiana are possible and that Russia is discussing the sending of cosmonauts to China's space station. Rogozin said that he has spoken with Bill Nelson and that he will do so again. The issue of continued participation in the ISS program and its lifespan came up but nothing definitive was decided.

Rogozin told on what conditions the United States handed over Sea Launch to Russia, RIA Novosti (auto translation)

"The United States agreed to transfer Russian space rocket complex "Sea Launch" under the condition that it will not compete with the US company SpaceX Elon Musk , said General Director of " Roscosmos " Dmitry Rogozin. "Specific strict restrictions were introduced when signing this contract for the transfer of two Sea Launch vessels to a Russian company (S7 - ed.) - an obligation that we do not have the right to use this Sea Launch in competition with Elon Musk," he said during parliamentary hearings in the State Duma. "Okay? That is, the US government, government lawyers act as a client of, in fact, a private company (SpaceX - ed.). Or maybe it is not a private company in this case, if with the help of state sanctions we are limited to compete with SpaceX?" "- added Rogozin."

Russia's space chief threatens to leave International Space Station program unless U.S. lifts sanctions

"Russia's space chief threatened Monday to withdraw from the International Space Station program if U.S. sanctions against Moscow's space entities are "not lifted in the near future." "If the sanctions against Progress and TsNIIMash remain and are not lifted in the near future, the issue of Russia's withdrawal from the ISS will be the responsibility of the American partners," Roscosmos Director General Dmitry Rogozin said during a Russian parliament hearing on Monday, according to an NBC translation. "Either we work together, in which case the sanctions are lifted immediately, or we will not work together and we will deploy our own station," he added."

Roscosmos unable to launch some satellites due to sanctions -- Rogozin, TASS

"Russian space corporation Roscosmos will be unable to launch some satellites due to the lack of microchips that cannot be imported due to sanctions. "We have more than enough rockets, but there is nothing to put in space," Rogozin told the State Duma during hearings on Western sanctions and measures being taken to minimize their effects on the Russian economy and politics."

Issuance of a new Ukraine-related Executive Order; Ukraine-related Designations, U.S. Department of the Treasury

"ROGOZIN, Dmitry Olegovich (a.k.a. ROGOZIN, Dmitriy; a.k.a. ROGOZIN, Dmitry); DOB 21 Dec 1963; POB Moscow, Russia; Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation (individual) [UKRAINE2]."

- Can Sanctioned Roscosmos Chief Rogozin Visit The U.S.?, earlier post

NASA Administrator Statement on Meeting with Roscosmos

"NASA Administrator Bill Nelson released the following statement after an introductory call Friday with Roscosmos General Director Dmitry Rogozin: "I was pleased to speak with General Director Dimitry Rogozin this morning in a productive discussion about continued cooperation between NASA and Roscosmos."

Dmitry Rogozin held phone call with NASA head Bill Nelson, Roscosmos

"Therewith, the head of Roscosmos stated several questions that had been initiated by the US side earlier and now are substantially hindering the cooperation. First of all this is about the sanctions introduced by the American administration against the enterprises of the Russian space industry, as well as the absence of any official information in Roscosmos from the US partners on the plans to further control and operate the ISS."


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This page is an archive of entries in the Russia category from June 2021.

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