Space & Planetary Science: December 2016 Archives

Keith's note: Simon Porter (@ascendingnode) works at SwRI on New Horizons. Juno is managed by SwRI, so I assume he knows something about JunoCam too. Despite the Twitter scolding by Porter, the JunoCam website has no statement as to when specific images will be released. Here's the strange thing: someone on the Juno team clearly has an image file of Jupiter's rings as seen by Juno - an image that they managed to put into a format that could be shown via a laptop on a screen for hundreds (thousands) of people to see at AGU. So, if such an image file exists, why can't the Juno folks Tweet that same image for the rest of us to see? If it was not technically possible to Tweet the image, someone in the audience could have taken a picture of the picture and then tweeted it. But wait, there is some sort of ban of pictures taken inside of the AGU sessions - even though people in those sessions constantly post them with a #AGU16 tag on them anyway.

Meanwhile, today, in a public park across the street from the meeting site in San Francisco lots of AGU attendees went to a rally to promote transparency for climate science research - something that may be threatened under the incoming Trump administration. On one hand these scientists want government funding for their research and for their data to be publicly available. Yet in other cases they want government funding for their research but only show the results of their research to each other and maybe to the public - eventually. I have made a request to NASA SMD and PAO for this image. I am waiting for a yes or a no.

You science folks can't have it both ways. If you want government money then you need to be proactive in all instances with the results of your government-funded research.

Keith's update: According to NASA PAO: "the plan is to post the Jupiter ring image to the Mission Juno website tomorrow morning. As you may have noticed, most of the images from Sunday's second science pass (PJ3) have already posted - a day ahead of schedule. Unlike most of our raw images, the "ring" needs some processing, since it's a full spin image with 360-degrees of spacecraft rotation vs an arc."

I still do not understand why the image shown publicly at AGU could not have been tweeted. NASA posted/tweeted raw images from Opportunity, Spirit, and Curiosity as soon as they arrived on Earth. Cleaned up versions were posted later.


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