Workforce: May 2010 Archives

Lockheed weighs layoffs, other cuts for Orion program", Denver Post

"Lockheed Martin officials have begun looking throughout the Orion crew-capsule program for savings that can be used to cover possible contract termination costs. Those savings could include layoffs of some of the 600 to 650 Lockheed employees in Colorado who are working on the NASA spacecraft."

Save the space program, HBJ readers say, Houston Business Journal

"Houstonians are protective of the region's NASA jobs, according to responses to the latest BusinessPulse survey. Houston Business Journal asked readers if it was a waste of time to save the human space flight program, and 73 percent responded "no - we need space exploration/save jobs."

Work starts on jobs plan, Florida Today

"U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development John Fernandez visited Central Florida Thursday as part of his efforts to develop a plan to invest $40 million to help soon-to-be-jobless space workers by bringing in industries that can put them back to work."

Last of space shuttle segments leaves Utah, Desert News

"Even as the space shuttle program is winding down, ATK is building the five-segment first stage of the "next-generation" rocket, the Ares 1, and has all five segments in the test stand for a ground test planned in September. Due to the phasing out of the space shuttle program, ATK announced a fourth round of layoffs involving 247 workers last week. Since last April, a total of 1,500 workers have been let go."

Bishop asks NASA: Will changes be safer for astronauts?, Standard-Examiner

"In a U.S. House hearing on Capitol Hill, Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, held a photo of an unidentified Utah worker who lost his job last week at ATK, one of the contractors for the Constellation program. "I hope I can tell him he lost his job because the government was going to save money or come up with a program that was safer for astronauts ... not because we are choosing winners or losers in the free market," said Bishop at a hearing of the House Committee on Science and Technology."

Major NASA Spacebook Upgrades Now Live

"What is Happening: NASA Spacebook ( has a new look and simplified navigation to make collaboration easier. These latest changes just went live. For those that responded to our email on April 26, thank you. This notice is to inform you of a major upgrade that includes enhancements based on user feedback. We want to hear what you think about these latest enhancements! Please take a moment to fill out this short survey so we can continue to enhance the site to meet your needs:"

The Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) area was a hive of activity this week. The space shuttle Atlantis roared off the launch pad on its final mission, STS-132. Over at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex it was announced that the final frontier will beam down in the form of a live stage show. It was also revealed this week that come this September, Brevard County in general and KSC in particular will be playing host to robots in disguise!

This past week at Cape Canaveral saw the passing of a space legend, the build up to one of the final shuttle launches and efforts to stem the flow of highly-technical space jobs away from the area.

It also saw private space company SpaceX striving to meet the launch criteria for its Falcon 9 rocket.

2 dead after explosion at Ala. Army base, AP

"Two contract workers died after being injured in an explosion while removing a propellant from rockets at Redstone Arsenal, where the Army conducts missile and weapons research. The public affairs office at the post in Huntsville said the two died Wednesday night after being flown to the burn unit at UAB Hospital in Birmingham. Base officials said Thursday the names of the workers would be released later. Both worked for a Redstone contractor, Amtech Corp., and were injured in an explosion at 8:45 a.m. Wednesday while removing ammonium perchlorate from rockets at a test site. The Army described the chemical as an oxidizer used in solid rocket propellant."

Open Government Advocates Grade Federal Agency Openness Plans, OMB Watch

"Overall, most agencies scored at 70 percent of total points or higher. Fewer than half of all agencies received 80 percent or higher. The top three agencies, which scored above 100 percent, were the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It should be noted that no agency achieved 100 percent compliance with the OGD criteria, as can be seen in the agencies' basic scores (scores that did not include any bonus points). Those agencies that scored over 100 percent overcame minor point deductions by earning bonus points."

Open Government Plans Evaluations Available -- Find Wide Variations in Plans, OpenThe Government

"No plan fulfilled all of the requirements of the OGD, but eight agencies created plans that stand out for their overall strength: NASA, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Labor(DOL). Of the top tier plans, NASA, HUD and EPA stand out for presenting model plans."

New White House task force on NASA to focus on job loss, The Hill

"President Barack Obama is commissioning a new task force to address any job loss caused by the White House's proposed end to NASA's manned space-flight program. In a memo released late Monday, the president appointed Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden as co-chairs of the Task Force on Space Industry Workforce and Economic Development."

Rep. Posey's Statement on Space Workforce Transition Memo

"In his memo, the President blames the previous Administration for eliminating thousands of high skilled jobs and outsourcing them to Russia, but makes no mention of his decision to cancel Constellation after $9 billion in investments and a successful test launch. At some point the President needs to take responsibility for his own Administration's decision to widen the space gap and cede America's leadership in space, which is the modern day military high ground. I am disappointed to see the memo repeat the disingenuous claim we keep hearing that NASA will get a $6 billion increase, when in reality the Administration's own budget numbers would gut the Exploration account by $5.7 billion, which is where the money needs to be spent for human space flight."

No Hot Meals at GSFC

Keith's note: The following is being circulated internally at GSFC: "The cafeterias in buildings 1 and 21, as well as the Cafe in building 34, are closed until further notice. These closings are based on the cafeteria contractors failure to pass their most recent food safety inspections. If you have any questions, please contact GSFC's Industrial Hygiene Office on 6-2498. Every effort will be made to address the necessary actions quickly in order that the cafeterias can be re-opened, but only after they pass the necessary safety inspections. Center management is taking this situation very seriously and will not consider reopening the cafeterias until they are confident that all of the issues have been addressed, actions have been completed and a re-inspection confirms that the facilities are ready to safely operate. In addition, both near and long-term enhancements to the operation of these facilities are being explored.Updates on the status of the facilities will be provided as soon they become available."



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This page is an archive of entries in the Workforce category from May 2010.

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