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#whyspacematters Does Not Seem to Matter

By Keith Cowing
August 20, 2015
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#whyspacematters Does Not Seem to Matter

Keith’s note: NASA used some rather expensive astronaut time to set up this photo, take it, send it back to Earth, and post it online. This project NASA, UN Photo Competition Highlights Why Space Matters on Earth announced by NASA on 16 June 2015. The intent was good. Seriously. But looking at the follow-up and popularity of the #whyspacematters hashtag on Twitter … well, its not so good. Too bad. This is a most noble and desirable effort and is emblematic of the uses of space utilization with an intentional global impact.
Perhaps NASA PAO, UNOOSA, et al can promote this a little better? (Hint).
Too bad that the Planetary Society, National Space Society, Space Frontier Foundation etc. are not doing more to promote this. But then again … space advocates really do not do well outside of their self-limiting comfort zones. Nor do they care to do so.
What a perfect opportunity to get outside the usual space advocacy comfort zone. Space advocacy needs to be inclusive, intrinsically expansive, but grounded in sociopolitical reality. Alas, space advocacy is currently exclusive, insular, tone deaf, elitist, and inherently inbred. Yea, like that is how we get nations to expend billions to expand outward into our solar system – using someone else’s tax dollars.
Caption: “NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is photographed in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) holding a sign with the hashtag #whyspacematters. NASA and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) have launched a global photography competition to highlight how the vantage point of space helps us better understand our home planet, improve lives, and safeguard our future by aiding sustainable development on Earth. ISS043E294202 (06/10/2015) – Larger image.”

NASA Watch founder, Explorers Club Fellow, ex-NASA, Away Teams, Journalist, Space & Astrobiology, Lapsed climber.