The International Space Station Is The Undiscovered Country

http://images.spaceref.com/news/ooenterprise.iss.jpg

Why The International Space Station Is The Single Best Thing We Did, Wired

"The International Space Station is one of the few nonstellar things up there that we can see from down here without instruments. It's a prefab home the size of a football field, 462 tons and more than $100 billion worth of pressurized roomlike modules and gleaming solar arrays, orbiting 250 miles above the surface of the Earth. Its flight path is available online, and you can find out when it will make a nighttime pass over your backyard. Right on schedule, you'll spot an unblinking white light that's moving at 17,500 miles an hour. It will cross your field of view, on a line straight enough to have been drawn with a ruler, in only a few seconds. A few minutes more and the men and women inside that light will be over Greece. A few minutes more, Mongolia. There have been 53 expeditions to the ISS; 53 long-duration crews have called it home since Expedition 1 floated aboard in 2000. They've been mostly from America and Russia, the two principal and unlikely partners in one of the most expensive and challenging construction projects ever completed. (The ISS rose out of the ashes of two previous space stations: Russia's Mir, last occupied in 1999 before it fell out of the sky in 2001, and Ronald Reagan's proposed Freedom, which never got past the blueprints.) Its first few residents came and went largely without incident, conducting scientific experiments in everything from fluid dynamics to zero-G botany while studying what month after weightless month can do to the human body."

  • submit to reddit


Loading







Join our mailing list




Monthly Archives

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on December 19, 2017 6:00 PM.

Bigelow Aerospace Had a Secret DoD UFO Study Contract (Update) was the previous entry in this blog.

The First Falcon Heavy Awaits Its Sports Car Payload is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.