MSL Needs More Money

NASA's Overbudget Mars Rover in Need of Another Cash Infusion

"NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission needs an $82 million cash infusion to maintain its late November launch date after development of the $2.47 billion rover exhausted program funding reserves last year, according to agency officials. .... "Our problem right now is MSL," Green told members of the NASA Advisory Council's planetary sciences subcommittee during a public meeting here Jan. 26. "It has virtually no unencumbered reserves left.""

MSL Delay: Add 2 Years and $400 Million (and counting), earlier post from 2009

"In a nutshell: The only specific hardware issue with MSL seems to be the complex motor actuators that allow various systems to operate. The delay will cost $400 million. The money will come from other Mars missions and if that is not enough, from other space science missions. Total cost for MSL could be as much as $2.3 billion - up from an initial cost of $650 million (or $1.6 billion depending on what starting point you favor)."

Mars rover devours budgets, Nature, 2009

"The rover's latest price tag is US$2.286 billion - 40% more than the official $1.63-billion estimate made in 2006. But even that will not be enough. In a 'breach report' due to be handed to the US Congress by the end of July, NASA will report that the troublesome mission, now also called Curiosity, needs $15-115 million more on top of the $2.286-billion estimate."

Shooting The Messenger at NASA, earlier post from 2008

"NASA Watch has learned that the individual personally responsible for the disbanding of the MSL independent "Cost To Go" review team early this year was none other than NASA Associate Administrator Chris Scolese. He did not like the findings they were bringing forth. It seems that in his NASA, when you don't like bad cost news you either move the goal posts until you get the news you want - or you get rid of the messengers - or both."

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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on January 30, 2011 7:41 PM.

STS-134 Commander Decision In Mid-Feb was the previous entry in this blog.

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