Surprise Surprise. Another SLS Launch Delay

NASA's big rocket misses another deadline, now won't fly until 2022, Ars Technica

"Publicly, NASA is still holding on to the possibility of a 2021 launch date for the debut flight of its Space Launch System rocket. This week, an agency spokesperson told Ars that "NASA is working toward a launch for the Artemis I mission by the end of this year." However, a source said the best-case scenario for launching the Artemis 1 mission is spring of next year, with summer being the more realistic target for a test flight of the heavy lift rocket and Orion spacecraft. The space agency is already running about two months behind internal targets for testing and integrating the rocket at Kennedy Space Center, and the critical pre-flight tests remain ahead."

- SLS Just Lost One Of Its Big Selling Points, earlier post
- Surprise: SLS Will Cost 30% More Than The Last Big Cost Increase, earlier post
- Congress Uses Legal Snark To Ask NASA About SLS And Europa, earlier post
- Babin Requests Information on Europa Clipper Mission and SLS Use, earlier post
- NASA OIG Follow-up to May 2019 Audit of Europa Mission: Congressional Launch Vehicle Mandate, earlier post
- Europa Clipper Mission Confirmed, earlier post
- GAO Report On NASA: Things Cost More And Take Longer, earlier post
- Moon 2024 Goal Delays SLS Availability For Europa Clipper, earlier post

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This page contains a single entry by Keith Cowing published on September 1, 2021 7:33 PM.

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